PipeChat Digest #3537 - Wednesday, March 12, 2003
 
Re: CC's opinion about Walcker
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: it's all in what you're USED to
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: it's all in what you're USED to
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: leather and soot
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
RE: Benoit and Rohlig
  by "Nance, Daryel" <DNance@svdp-edu.org>
Felix Hell in Schenectady, NY
  by "Stephen Best" <sbest@borg.com>
Re: leathered lips question
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Oboe, etc (NO ORGAN CONTENT) (Sorry, long)
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Another request for help
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: it's all in what you're USED to
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: CC's opinion about Walcker From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 19:52:02 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 12:34 PM Subject: RE: CC's opinion about Walcker     > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.net.ve > > Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> > wrote: > > > Firstly, Cavaille-Coll "possibly" demonstrates that he > > did not fully understand the German tradition of early > > romantic organ music. > > I guess that too.   Probably so -- with their dominant principals German organs were not = likely to appeal to the French who went in for dominant reeds, etc.   However, it should be born in mind that Cavaille-Coll was familiar with British organbuilding as well. He visited Willis's organ at St. George's Hall in Liverpool and did not think a great deal of it. He did, however, much admire the organs of T. C. Lewis, whose work was in many ways a synthesis of Cavaille-Coll and Schulze. And it is interesting that the German organbuilder Edmund Schulze also much admired the work of Lewis.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 19:57:26 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 11:35 AM Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to     <And did you pay the fine for disturbing the peace?   Some years back, several churches here were issued tickets for ringing their bells on Sunday mornings and waking non-church-going neighbours. (Not mind you for broadcasting an entire service from the bell-tower!)   In all cases, they were unrepentent, refused to pay the fines citing the long-standing tradition of ringing bells to summon the parish to worship, and continued ringing their bells. And the whole thing blew over in a matter of a few weeks, the sleepless neighbours not being heard from since then.>   I remember when I was a child in rural England a neighbor complained about the clock at our church keeping him awake at night. The Vicar turned off the chimes, and then set his alarm to remind him to call up the neighbor = at 4 o'clock in the morning to tell him that he had done so.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 19:59:30 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 12:58 PM Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to     >The doctor has since passed away. Lee     The Grim Reaper can usually be relied upon to take care of most of these problems sooner or later.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: leather and soot From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 20:04:04 -0600   I think the record in the US may have been held by the 1802 Tannenberg = organ at Hebron Lutheran Church, Madison, Virginia, whose bellows leather lasted over one hundred and fifty years.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: RE: Benoit and Rohlig From: "Nance, Daryel" <DNance@svdp-edu.org> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 20:17:31 -0600   Glenda, If no one offers their copy, check out my website www.dompaulbenoit.com , it is available from luxembourg. Let me know if = you don't get any offers of the score.   Peace and blessings, Daryel       Daryel Nance St.Vincent de Paul Church, Houston mailto:dnance@svdp-edu.org www.svmusic.info ; www.dompaulbenoit.com ; www.church-organist.com ; www.daryeln.com   "...the only ones among you who will really be happy are those who sought and found how to serve." Albert Schwietzer         -----Original Message----- From: Glenda [mailto:gksjd85@direcway.com] Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 6:56 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: Benoit and Rohlig     Speaking of Benoit, does anyone have his "Pieces d'orgue" that he/she would consider parting with for a reasonable sum of filthy lucre? I've been informed that it is permanently out of print. I'm not sure to whom to reply for copying privileges, inasmuch as I don't have the publisher.   I am also looking for Harald Rohlig's "Music for Sunday Morning, Volume 6: Prelude, Voluntary, Postlude", published by Concordia? I know it is permanently out of print, and as we speak I am trying to obtain copying privileges.   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Schenectady, NY From: "Stephen Best" <sbest@borg.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 21:27:13 -0500   Some organs are really easy to play. Sitting down at the console is like driving a fine luxury automobile. One can lean back, relax, and enjoy the experience. The instrument is skillfully matched to the room, which is itself perfect for making music. These are dream instruments, the kinds of organs performers love to play.   But this isn=92t the way it always is. There are organs which are a challenge to the best performers. They are poorly placed, in rooms with all the acoustical ambiance of a carpeted living room, and they have idiosyncrasies that keep the organist on edge. Playing these instruments is rather like piloting a jet-powered skateboard on a very rocky road. Hang on, folks!   The latter is what faced Felix Hell when he performed at First United Methodist in Schenectady, New York, on Sunday, March 9. This isn=92t a =93fun=94 organ to play, and it certainly isn=92t a =93fun=94 room to play = in. The Carlson organ is shrill and unrelenting, never in tune, and placed in ways that inhibit good ensemble. Organ and room being such as they are, many organists simply won=92t attend recitals in this venue. But the faithful were there no matter what -- a crowd of several hundred people gathered to hear what this young genius would do in so challenging a situation.   Anyone who=92s read my previous reviews of Felix Hell know that I have come to regard this young man as one of the finest organists of this era. Note for note, I=92ve experienced as significant an emotional experience at a Hell recital as I=92ve experienced anywhere. And guess what! Even in the face of Schenectady=92s daunting challenges, Felix Hell came out on top once again, thrilling the audience with his dazzling technique, his personal charm, and -- most importantly of all -- his ability to make extraordinary music.   The program opened with the Buxtehude D major prelude and fugue. From the first notes, Felix demonstrated that he was in full control of this disconcerting instrument. He knows how to extract the best sounds the organ has to offer, always tempering his awareness of historic practice with his ear. There were no generic sounds from this artist. Every section of this work, and every work we heard, had obviously been treated with care. Every stop change was done with purpose to good effect. Buxtehude couldn=92t have sounded better in this place!   Three major Bach works followed: the =93Wedge=94 prelude and fugue, =93Schmucke dich,=94 and the =93St. Anne.=94 In the hands of many = performers, this heavy fare can make an audience made up mostly of non-musicians lose interest. But not in the hands of Felix Hell! The =93Wedge=94 prelude =   was stately and driving from start to finish. The fugue showed Felix=92s virtuosic technique, but without ever making the listener feel that musicianship had been ignored in favor of razzle-dazzle. As for =93Schmucke dich,=94 Felix did the best shaping of the wonderful florid lines I=92ve ever heard. There was no fussy or idiosyncratic ornamentation =   going on here -- everything fit, everything sang. It was wonderful. By the time he finished the =93St. Anne,=94 the lady in front looked as if = she had been =93touched by an angel,=94 so glowing was her demeanor. The man behind me uttered an =93oh my=94 that couldn=92t be mistaken for anything = but total satisfaction. These are the kinds of reactions I like to see at organ recitals: hearts have been touched, souls have been stirred to their greatest depths, precisely the kinds of reactons that make people want to come back for another organ recital!   The Jongen =93Toccata=94 which started the second half was tossed off as = if it were a beginner=92s piece, filled with fire but completely controlled, letting us know that Felix wasn=92t just warmed up, he was hot! The Mendelssohn 6th sonata further demonstrated Felix=92s gifts of registration, and kept us entranced while we prepared for the closing block buster, Guilmant=92s first sonata. This has become one of Felix=92s trademark pieces, and we could all hear why. Felix made us forget that we were in venue was hardly the ideal fit for this great masterpiece. We sat on the edges of our seats as the final movement swept to its conclusion, after which we saw -- for once -- a GENUINE standing ovation, followed by the Bach =93Gigue=94 fugue as an encore, a dazzling = one indeed. What an afternoon of music making!   Lest the reader thinks I=92ve lost all objectivity, fear not! Even an artist of Felix=92s stature has moments here and there where things = don=92t quite go as planned, but in the face of the entire experience, mentioning such things has no purpose. This was one great recital. Period.   So just what happens at a Felix Hell recital that separates his performances from almost everyone else=92s? I keep trying to figure it out. It all starts the moment he walks out to play. You can tell from the spring in his step and the sparkle in his eye that he loves what he=92s doing, and he=92s going to make you love it too, all =93said=94 = without playing a single note. Then the real magic begins: this isn=92t a cerebral =   player, but rather a player whose very being is immersed in making music. Every muscle in his body seems to be a part of his playing. His ability to speak through music transcends anything that intellect can explain. One has to be there to experience it. If you=92ve heard Felix Hell, you=92ll know what I mean. If you haven=92t, then make it a point to =   do so. Then YOU can try to explain it all in words that I simply lack.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   P.S. Be sure to pick up a copy of Felix Hell=92s latest CDs, recorded in live recital at Sacred Heart in Newark. The Guilmant first and the Liszt =93Ad nos=94 alone are worth the price. What a sound!          
(back) Subject: Re: leathered lips question From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 20:25:46 -0600   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 1:03 PM Subject: leathered lips question     > Andres Gunther > agun@telcel.net.ve > > Keith Morgan wrote: > > (SNIP) > > It has three 8' Open > > Diapasons in the great; the First 8' Open Diapason has > > leathered lips and is cut unbelievably high. > > I heard about this system but never saw or heard one "live". Questions: > > *How did it influence the pipe sound? - What effect was achieved?     Although neo-baroque enthusiasts have constantly slandered leathered lips = as making for a dull sound, in actuality the reverse is true the presence of leather on the upper lips makes for a much brighter sound, allowing for = the power and cut-ups to be increased without losing the harmonics. I have no idea why this works, but it seems to.   > *On which stops was it used?   Really on any flue pipes that you want to be loud without losing = brightness. On organs where there were several Open Diapasons of different scales on = the Great Organ, it was sometimes used on the largest scaled one (i.e. the No. = 1 Open Diapason). It was also sometimes used on Diapasons on the Solo division, under the name of Diapason Phonon, Stentorphone, etc. I have = also seen it used on big flutes such as Tibias and Gross Flutes.   > *Only on metal or on wood pipes too?   Both wood and metal pipes.   > *Was it for high or normal wind pressure? (the high cuts here suggests = it > was for high...)   It depends what you mean by high pressures. Certainly not on very low pressures, but it might be used on relatively low pressures (say 5 or 6"), though probably more commonly on pressures of 7.1/2" to 10" or above.   > *When and where was it built or used? (Is it a typical american system = or > was it spreaded in other countries too?)   It was popular in both Britain and America. Robert Hope Jones, the originator of the WurliTzer theatre organ made considerable use of it, and so did builders like Harrison and Willis in England and Skinner and Austin in America in the period from about 1900 to 1935. Recently (since about = the year 2000) it is starting to experience something of a revival in the = United States.   > *What kind of leather was used?   Cabretta is a good kind to use. That is, a fine grained hair sheep, preferably chrome tanned. For a typical 8' stop one might use two thicknesses -- something around 20 thousandths of an inch from Low C to about c2 and something around half as thick for the trebles. The leather = is glued on to the full width of the upper lip of the pipe, with perhaps a couple centimeters of leather showing on the inside and outside of the = pipe above the lip for Low C, getting correspondingly less toward the treble. Obviously you have to adjust the cut-up first!   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: Oboe, etc (NO ORGAN CONTENT) (Sorry, long) From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 21:36:05 EST   In a message dated 3/11/03 1:37:48 AM Eastern Standard Time, STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net writes:   << <<<<<<But I'd like to hear their *opinion* of the oboe or the = violoncello. Do they even have one? Do you envy the job prospects of an applied major = in French horn?>>>> >>   I must've missed whatever started this discussion, but as a bassoonist, I = see things through a slightly different viewpoint. There are some orchestral instrumentalists which are always in short supply. Among these are oboe & =   bassoon, horn, viola, bass, and cello. I know many players of these instruments who manage to piece together a comfortable living playing in several different regional orchestras (otherwise known as "Freeway Philharmonics"), chamber groups, free-lance concerts, church jobs, and musicals. True, there is always going to be intense competition for jobs = in major orchestras, but considering there might be 1,000+ applicants for a flute/trumpet/violin opening vs. 50 for a bassoon opening, I like the odds =   much better for my instrument. Another performing opportunity many people =   don't think about are the military bands (yes, there are even a few = military orchestras!). The US military is probably the largest employer of = musicians in the world; given that the army has somewhere in the neighborhood of 45 bands (It's been a few years since I was in one, so the numbers are a bit hazy). There are also many semi-pros who have a "day-job" to support = their habit of being a musician. They do have to do lots of running around for = the night and weekend gigs, but it's a much better part time job than stocking =   shelves at Wal-mart, or saying "Would you like fries with that?"   And even before we get the that level, there is college scholarship money = to think about. I've had several private bassoon students who went to = college with majors in such things as computer = science/philosophy/pre-med/aero-space engineering, who got scholarship money from their colleges music = departments for playing in the band/orchestra. Sometimes, it's difficult for a flute = or piano major to even think about such money.   Lastly, you have to look at the reasons these people do it. They do it = for the same reason you play the organ. There was something that happened to them sometime that made them realize that there is some kind of "magic" = (for lack of a better word) in playing an instrument, and they realized that = this feeling would HAVE to be a part of their life for as long as they could = still make it happen.   ****************** As an aside, it is sometimes more refreshing to play with the part-time musicians and semi-pros than with the "full-time" musicians. The former realize how much "fun" it is to perform, especially in a group (be it = large or small), whereas the latter, in many cases, feel they have to put on the =   pretense of "I don't really like to do this, I'm just doing it to pay the bills".  
(back) Subject: Another request for help From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 22:56:00 EST     --part1_156.1cf003f5.2ba009d0_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Posters,   I'd like to thank Pat Maimone for being the only one who responded to my urgent request for jazz help. I realize that the pipe organ and jazz = don't really go together, but I'd like to narrow my request down to a single number.   Does anybody have a copy of Duke Ellington's "I got it bad, and that ain't =   good"? What I would like to obtain is the melody line (actually notes on = the staff) along with the chord names. I guess that's what's contained in a = Fake Book. I have a copy that I found online that has the lyrics and chords, = but no actual notes. I can't really determine the key from that - the chords = in this jazz stuff don't seem to have any relationship to the key signature. = I also have a written out "chord progression" but no words, and I can't tell =   where the words fit in. The accompaniment that's in my score mainly has = cues from the instruments that are supposed to be playing, but most of the = chord names are missing.   Thanks, Keith Zimmerman - sorry this doesn't have anything to do with organs.   --part1_156.1cf003f5.2ba009d0_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Posters,<BR> <BR> I'd like to thank Pat Maimone for being the only one who responded to my = urg=3D ent request for jazz help.&nbsp; I realize that the pipe organ and jazz = don'=3D t really go together, but I'd like to narrow my request down to a single = num=3D ber.<BR> <BR> Does anybody have a copy of Duke Ellington's "I got it bad, and that ain't = g=3D ood"?&nbsp; What I would like to obtain is the melody line (actually notes = o=3D n the staff) along with the chord names.&nbsp; I guess that's what's = contain=3D ed in a Fake Book.&nbsp; I have a copy that I found online that has the = lyri=3D cs and chords, but no actual notes.&nbsp; I can't really determine the key = f=3D rom that - the chords in this jazz stuff don't seem to have any = relationship=3D to the key signature.&nbsp; I also have a written out "chord progression" = b=3D ut no words, and I can't tell where the words fit in.&nbsp; The = accompanimen=3D t that's in my score mainly has cues from the instruments that are = supposed=3D20=3D to be playing, but most of the chord names are missing.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith Zimmerman - sorry this doesn't have anything to do with = organs.</FONT>=3D </HTML>   --part1_156.1cf003f5.2ba009d0_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 23:21:58 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0094_01C2E825.038866A0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   At my local village church (where I ring bells) - as opposed to the =3D church where I play the organ (and don't ask why they're different) - =3D the vicar was berated by the bride he was rehearsing that she was paying = =3D =3DA380 ($100+ ?) for the sound of the bells before and after the wedding = =3D service "and all you have to do is switch them on!" The vicar asked her to accompany him up the stairs of the tower (past =3D the light switch whose flashing indicates to us that the bride has =3D arrived and its time to come to a stop) and into the ringing chamber - =3D where eight of us were busily engaged moving several tons of metal, and = =3D with 12 more ringers sat round waiting their turn to practice. We soon informed her that =3DA310 each for a half hour ringing before - = =3D the wait of 40mins for the ceremony - and a half hour afterwards was =3D merely a token gesture towards our expenses rather than a 'living wage' = =3D or a profit for the vicar.   Harry -----Original Message----- From: Chicaleee@aol.com <Chicaleee@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 11 March 2003 00:53 Subject: Re: it's all in what you're USED to =3D20 =3D20 Speaking of chimes, at one church the organ chimes had a switch =3D which would put it to an outside speaker, which was chimed at 11:00 on =3D Sunday morning. Then the switch was turned off. My first Sunday there, = =3D you guessed it, I forgot to turn off the switch. Not only were the =3D chimes on the outside speaker, so was the entire organ. The church =3D receive a complaint and a ticket for disturbing the peace. It awakened = =3D a doctor who lived across the street from the church. Lee=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0094_01C2E825.038866A0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Diso-8859-1 =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D'"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=3D3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2>At my local village church (where = I =3D ring bells)=3D20 - as opposed to the church where I play the organ (and don't ask why =3D they're=3D20 different) - the vicar was berated by the bride he was rehearsing that =3D she was=3D20 paying &pound;80 ($100+ ?) for the sound of the bells before and after =3D the=3D20 wedding service &quot;and all you have to do is switch them=3D20 on!&quot;</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2></FONT><FONT size=3D3D2>The vicar = =3D asked her to=3D20 accompany him up the stairs of the tower (past the light switch whose =3D flashing=3D20 indicates to us that the bride has arrived and its time to come to a =3D stop) and=3D20 into the ringing chamber - where eight of us were busily engaged moving = =3D several=3D20 tons of metal, and with 12 more ringers sat round waiting their turn = to=3D20 practice.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>We soon informed her that &pound;10 each for a half = =3D hour=3D20 ringing before - the wait of 40mins for the ceremony - and a half = hour=3D20 afterwards was merely a token gesture towards our expenses rather than a = =3D 'living=3D20 wage' or a profit for the vicar.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Harry</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: = =3D 5px"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><B>-----Original =3D Message-----</B><BR><B>From:=3D20 </B><A href=3D3D"mailto:Chicaleee@aol.com">Chicaleee@aol.com</A> =3D &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:Chicaleee@aol.com">Chicaleee@aol.com</A>&gt;<BR><B>To: = =3D </B><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> =3D &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A>&gt;<BR><B= =3D >Date:=3D20 </B>11 March 2003 00:53<BR><B>Subject: </B>Re: it's all in what =3D you're USED=3D20 to<BR><BR></DIV></FONT><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT =3D color=3D3D#400040=3D20 face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 size=3D3D2 FAMILY =3D3D SANSSERIF>Speaking = of =3D chimes, at one=3D20 church the organ chimes had a switch which would put it to an =3D outside=3D20 speaker, which was chimed at 11:00 on Sunday morning.&nbsp; Then the = =3D switch=3D20 was turned off.&nbsp; My first Sunday there, you guessed it, I =3D forgot to=3D20 turn off the switch.&nbsp; Not only were the chimes on the outside =3D speaker,=3D20 so was the entire organ.&nbsp; The church receive a complaint and a = =3D ticket=3D20 for disturbing the peace.&nbsp; It awakened a doctor who lived =3D across the=3D20 street from the church.&nbsp; Lee</FONT> =3D </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0094_01C2E825.038866A0--    
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 07:56:44 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001B_01C2E86C.ECC76E00 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Tremolo ? For a Trio Sonata ?   Wow, you really do things differently in far-away places (with =3D strange-sounding names)   Music (purist) man -----Original Message----- From: Cremona502@cs.com <Cremona502@cs.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 11 March 2003 22:56 Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? =3D20 =3D20 In a message dated 3/11/03 9:57:35 AM Eastern Standard Time, =3D aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com writes:=3D20 =3D20 =3D20 =3D20 Try playing a trio sonata on a 22-rank Wurlitzer.=3D20 =3D20 =3D20 =3D20 Ah... that's easy.=3D20 =3D20 I - Tibia=3D20 II - Kinura=3D20 Ped - Cello=3D20 =3D20 Tremolo II=3D20 =3D20 ;-)=3D20 =3D20 Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling =3D Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 =3D20     ------=3D_NextPart_000_001B_01C2E86C.ECC76E00 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Diso-8859-1 =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D'"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=3D3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2>Tremolo ?&nbsp; For a Trio Sonata = =3D ?</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Wow, you really do things differently in far-away = =3D places (with=3D20 strange-sounding names)</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#000000 size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Music (purist) man</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-LEFT: = =3D 5px"> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><B>-----Original =3D Message-----</B><BR><B>From:=3D20 </B><A href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com">Cremona502@cs.com</A> =3D &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:Cremona502@cs.com">Cremona502@cs.com</A>&gt;<BR><B>To: = =3D </B><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> =3D &lt;<A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A>&gt;<BR><B= =3D >Date:=3D20 </B>11 March 2003 22:56<BR><B>Subject: </B>Re: TWO OR THREE=3D20 MANUALS?<BR><BR></DIV></FONT><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT =3D size=3D3D2>In a=3D20 message dated 3/11/03 9:57:35 AM Eastern Standard Time, <A=3D20 =3D href=3D3D"mailto:aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com">aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com</A>= =3D20 writes: <BR><BR><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff solid 2px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"=3D20 TYPE =3D3D CITE>Try playing a trio sonata on a 22-rank Wurlitzer.=3D20 <BR></FONT><FONT color=3D3D#000000 face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0 = size=3D3D3 =3D FAMILY =3D3D=3D20 SANSSERIF></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT><FONT color=3D3D#000000 =3D face=3D3DArial lang=3D3D0=3D20 size=3D3D2 FAMILY =3D3D SANSSERIF><BR>Ah... that's easy. <BR><BR>I =3D &nbsp;-=3D20 &nbsp;Tibia <BR>II - &nbsp;&nbsp;Kinura <BR>Ped - Cello =3D <BR><BR>Tremolo II=3D20 <BR><BR>;-) <BR><BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in = the=3D20 Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502=3D20 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D20 <BR></FONT></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001B_01C2E86C.ECC76E00--