PipeChat Digest #3538 - Thursday, March 13, 2003
 
Re: Another request for help
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: News of my demise is premature!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: CC's opinion about Walcker
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: ANOTHER RANT
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Another request for help
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Another request for help
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
RE: Oboe, etc (and back to the organ)
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: News of my demise is premature!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
TCLewis
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Scintillating in Schenectady
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
TC Lewis
  by "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk>
Re: Scintillating in Schenectady
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Kilgen Magnets
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: TCLewis
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Another request for help From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 10:13:57 -0000   Hello Keith and all,   The full piano/vocal score is in G and may be available in the album 'Duke Ellington for Piano' , IMP (part of Warner I think) Ref 17083 ISBN 0 86359 64 7 9 - if it's still in print.   We have several exponents of popular music and jazz on the 'straight' pipe organ here in UK. William Davis (now retired) was probably the best known one - Nigel Ogden has recently done a CD ('Moolighting') Manchester Cathedral.   One type of music that sounds very good, almost fugue like, on this kind = of organ is the Rag - not really the thing for church though, considering = it's origin.   Cheers,   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2003 3:56 AM Subject: Another request for help     > Posters, > > I'd like to thank Pat Maimone for being the only one who responded to my > urgent request for jazz help. I realize that the pipe organ and jazz don't > really go together, but I'd like to narrow my request down to a single > number. > > Does anybody have a copy of Duke Ellington's "I got it bad, and that = ain't > good"? What I would like to obtain is the melody line (actually notes = on the > staff) along with the chord names. I guess that's what's contained in a Fake > Book. I have a copy that I found online that has the lyrics and chords, but > no actual notes. I can't really determine the key from that - the = chords in > this jazz stuff don't seem to have any relationship to the key = signature. I > also have a written out "chord progression" but no words, and I can't = tell > where the words fit in. The accompaniment that's in my score mainly has cues > from the instruments that are supposed to be playing, but most of the chord > names are missing. > > Thanks, > Keith Zimmerman - sorry this doesn't have anything to do with organs. >    
(back) Subject: Re: News of my demise is premature! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 12:27:36 +0000 (GMT)   Hello Alan,   Many thanks for your kind words.   I haven't quite moved yet....a few days away.   Too busy studying Arminian theology/House of Orange/Calvinism......you revealed a hole in my education!   Regards,   Colin   >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: CC's opinion about Walcker From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 12:39:34 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Which is what many of us have known for years!   If you want the best romantic organ sound in the world, study the work of Lewis. The fluework of Fr.Willis is the work of an amateur by comparison.   Interestingly, the Lewis sound also seems to work in relatively poor acoustics. I have played a few T C Lewis instruments of modest proportions, often in buildings of no great size and without great resonance. The effect is as it should be.....pure music.   It is interesting that Schulze should have such high regard for Lewis, because Lewis regarded Schulze as the greatest tonal artist who ever lived.   Dare I suggest that Lewis not only took on board the work of Schulze, but actually improved upon it?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote: >     > .......However, it should be born in mind that > Cavaille-Coll was familiar with > British organbuilding as well. He visited Willis's > organ at St. George's > Hall in Liverpool and did not think a great deal of > it. He did, however, > much admire the organs of T. C. Lewis, whose work > was in many ways a > synthesis of Cavaille-Coll and Schulze. And it is > interesting that the > German organbuilder Edmund Schulze also much admired > the work of Lewis. >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 12:47:14 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Well of course!   Clear as a bell!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Stephen Best <sbest@borg.com> wrote: > Seems this isn't as "far out" for a trio sonata as > one might think. I > recall one recital on an early 20th century 4 manual > Austin. The > recitalist didn't have the slightest idea how to > work with this > instrument, but in at least one show of originality, > she registered a > movement of a trio sonata just as Colin suggested. > Sadly, that was the > high point of the recital. > > Steve Best in Utica, NY > > Colin Mitchell wrote: > > >Hello, > > > >Easy peasy! > > > >Chrysoglot right hand, 8ft and 2ft Flutes Left > Hand, > >8ft string on the Pedal! (Trems strictly verbotten) > > >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: ANOTHER RANT From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 13:46:01 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Daryl's rant made me chuckle, but it contained more than a grain of truth.   I refuse to get embroiled in the pipe/digital controversy, which is the modern day equivalent to the Cinema/Church organ battles of years ago.   No.....I will concentrate upon the "boring organists" bit and the decline in popularity of the organ.   I have up my sleeve a lecture, which I sometimes dust off and give an airing to anyone who cares to turn up on the day. It concerns the "popularising" of the organ between about 1870 and 1945.....more accurately, it is thinly disguised fireside chat about cinema organists and organs.   In preparing that lecture and carrying out extensive research, a truth dawned upon me.   The organ, as an instrument, was kept in the public awareness domain for a very long time; whether as Fair Organs (Band Organs in the US), Church Organs, Town Hall organs, Church Organs or Cinema Organs....in fact, for about 75 years!   What we have witnessed is a decline in church attendance, the redundancy of organs in cinemas as high fidelty sound has taken over (quite rightly), the abandonment of automata as a source of delight, wonder and amusement and a decline in Town Hall concerts (with a few notable exceptions).   If we go back to the late 19th century, the exposure to organs was unavoidable....church, at the fair and at civic functions.   Then came the cinema organ, which reached younger minds with considerable skill, dexterity, panache, humour and not a little "bounce". Dance Halls were also a way of life, which either meant live bands or an organist.   Thus, light music and classical music combined to instill the worth of the organ as a musical instrument.   We should always keep in mind the fact that some of the better Cinema Organists were not only household names, but enjoyed a cult "pop" status....their salaries often in the stratosphere! (Quentin Maclean received, if I recall correctly, about 4,000 UK pounds a year, back in the depression years!!!!!)   With only one or two exceptions, those lucrative and high profile positions have long gone, along with many church organs, band organs etc etc.   I suspect therefore, that the organ is now a much more specialised instrument, a more serious instrument and a more musically niche instrument than it ever was before.   For what it's worth, IMHO, this is the real reason for the decline in the organ, but I would concede that "boring" performances contribute to the demise of ANYTHING.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Daryl Robinson <drobinson@houston.rr.com> wrote: > > It is NO wonder that the organ is a dying > species...........all of these academic STUCK up > types ......   > Most the time I go to an organ recital and fall > asleep because its unbelievably BORING.....   > ...The organ has always had a prominent > stage in history and the organ would probably be > worse off today if Virgil Fox and Diane Bish hadnt > done and are doing to help the organ.   > My overall point I suppose is that I think the fall > of the organ in this country atleast, and possibly > others (Havent looked into that too much) is partly > if not mostly to blame on those that play > it........the organist.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Another request for help From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 11:00:08 -0800   >Posters, > >I'd like to thank Pat Maimone for being the only one who responded >to my urgent request for jazz help. I realize that the pipe organ >and jazz don't really go together, but I'd like to narrow my request >down to a single number. > >Does anybody have a copy of Duke Ellington's "I got it bad, and that >ain't good"? What I would like to obtain is the melody line >(actually notes on the staff) along with the chord names. I guess >that's what's contained in a Fake Book. I have a copy that I found >online that has the lyrics and chords, but no actual notes. I can't >really determine the key from that - the chords in this jazz stuff >don't seem to have any relationship to the key signature. I also >have a written out "chord progression" but no words, and I can't >tell where the words fit in. The accompaniment that's in my score >mainly has cues from the instruments that are supposed to be >playing, but most of the chord names are missing. > >Thanks, >Keith Zimmerman - sorry this doesn't have anything to do with organs.   Guess you never heard Fats Waller on pipe organ? Or later George Wright? Tome Hazleton?   John V    
(back) Subject: Re: Another request for help From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 11:13:47 -0800   >>Posters, >> >>I'd like to thank Pat Maimone for being the only one who responded >>to my urgent request for jazz help. I realize that the pipe organ >>and jazz don't really go together, but I'd like to narrow my >>request down to a single number. >> >>Does anybody have a copy of Duke Ellington's "I got it bad, and >>that ain't good"? What I would like to obtain is the melody line >>(actually notes on the staff) along with the chord names. I guess >>that's what's contained in a Fake Book. I have a copy that I found >>online that has the lyrics and chords, but no actual notes. I >>can't really determine the key from that - the chords in this jazz >>stuff don't seem to have any relationship to the key signature. I >>also have a written out "chord progression" but no words, and I >>can't tell where the words fit in. The accompaniment that's in my >>score mainly has cues from the instruments that are supposed to be >>playing, but most of the chord names are missing. >> >>Thanks, >>Keith Zimmerman - sorry this doesn't have anything to do with organs. > >Guess you never heard Fats Waller on pipe organ? Or later George >Wright? Tome Hazleton? > >John V   OOPS! that S/B TOM Hazleton   john V  
(back) Subject: RE: Oboe, etc (and back to the organ) From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 13:53:57 -0500   ContraReed wrote:   > Lastly, you have to look at the reasons these people do it. They do it for the same reason you play the organ. There was something that happened to them sometime that made them realize that there is some kind of "magic" (for lack of a better word) in playing an instrument, and they realized = that this feeling would HAVE to be a part of their life for as long as they = could still make it happen.   Bingo!   And I daresay that they don't go around worrying about the unpopularity of the oboe (horn, etc.) or casting about for ways to get it up on the top 40 list. In quietness and confidence is their strength. Of course, they = would justly be delighted if the picture improved, but the problem isn't the = oboe or the repertoire or the way it has traditionally been played. It goes = much wider and deeper in contemporary culture than that. One indeed is right = to worry, but let's not bark up the wrong tree, having lost sight of the forest: because if, however well-intentioned, one resorts to distortion, gimmickry, and hype in the name of the organ, one does not solve the problem. On the contrary, one becomes PART of the PROBLEM.   I also agree with Colin Mitchell, who was explaining the former high = profile of the organ in terms of such phenomena as town halls and silent movies. Note that he was merely explaining. He wasn't proposing that if we go = back and play like that again, all will be well.   Let's notice that those who prescribe more performers like Virgil or Diane or Cameron are the alarmists. I must ask what I would suppose is an = obvious quesiton: If Virgil made the organ popular (and, all right, he did), then why do we have a problem? If the theater organists made the organ = popular, why are we worrying about the unpopularity of the organ today. It seems that whatever popularity they bought for it is quite evanescent. A few years later, we're back in the doldrums. It's a very sound reason to ask about the PRICE, in terms of a residue of artistic integrity, that we have all paid for such an epiphenomenon.      
(back) Subject: Re: News of my demise is premature! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 14:50:08 -0500   On 3/12/03 7:27 AM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Too busy studying Arminian theology/House of > Orange/Calvinism......you revealed a hole in my > education!   We all have THEM. My normally fine-tuned sense of Arminianism and = Calvinism (urp!) is pretty foggy, so I'm going to want to come back to you on this. It's not a subject that comes up every couple of days--even on this list. Meanwhile, I'll do a tad of reading myself. Then I'll likely have a question or two, too.   Alan    
(back) Subject: TCLewis From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 10:22:37 +1300   100% accurate, Colin. I've already learned from this List, of course, that we both regard T.C.Lewis as one of the greatest organbuilders who has ever lived. And we do agree, also, that Lewis pipes are just as good amidst aridity as reverberation. Like Colin, I'm a Southwark fan, Ross   >If you want the best romantic organ sound in the >world, study the work of Lewis. The fluework of >Fr.Willis is the work of an amateur by comparison. >Interestingly, the Lewis sound also seems to work >in relatively poor acoustics. I have played a few T C >Lewis instruments of modest proportions, often in >buildings of no great size and without great >resonance. The effect is as it should be.....pure >music.      
(back) Subject: Scintillating in Schenectady From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 16:00:53 -0500   Scintillating in Schenectady Felix Hell returned to the First Methodist Church in Schenectady yesterday for his second appearance in their concert series. Once again, Felix WOW'ed the virtually full church with his technique, style, grace and charm ! Here's the program: Prelude in D Major - Buxtehude P&F in e minor (The Wedge) - Bach "Schmuecke Dich O Liebe Seele" (Leipzig Chorale) - Bach P&F in Eb Major (St. Anne) - Bach Intermission Toccata Opus 104 - Jongen Sonata #6 (Vater Unser Im Himmelreich) - Mendelssohn Sonata # 1 in d minor. - Guilmant Before I go on, I must comment on the church and organ. This is (in my opinion) a rather unfortunate situation. The church seats probably 500 or so and has a spacious look and feel, Unfortunately, everything is fully carpeted and a spacious SOUND is totally lacking. I am no fan of this instrument either. I will post the specs at the end of this narrative. The GREAT and SWELL (and PEDAL) are crammed into chambers on either side of a very shallow "quire" which is only about 6 feet deep. The only tonal egress is across this small space, with the result being that the whole organ is rather buried in sound. EXCEPT for the positive, which is in a flower box arrangement directly behind the altar ! This results in a positive that can just about overpower the GREAT ! The organ is a 1977 Leonard Carlson rebuild of a former Wicks. The principals are thin and cold and the brightwork shrill and overbearing. The flutes are varied and very uneven. Some notes "chiffed" to the point of sounding like a marimba while adjacent notes had almost no chiff at all ! Tuning was also a problem, but with the weather we've been having lately, that is understandable. Due to heavy snow in Syracuse, I was a tad late in arriving and missed most of the Buxtehude. "Schmuecke Dich" is one of Felix's "standards" and should be because he always does such a nice job of it ! The " St. Anne" was simply wonderful, rich and sonorous ( and on this organ, that's saying something). The Jones reminded me of Virgil at his best - 'nub said! The Mendel Sonata on Vaster User I Homeric is a study in creative registration and Felix gets very high marks, indeed! I have mentioned before that Felix has a real gift for registrations and it really shows here. Even on a "tough" organ, Felix found a plethora of wonderful colors to paint this picture, including the judicious use of the warmer sounds of the ECHO organ ! ! I have heard Felix play the Guilmant #1 a total of five times, each on a different instrument, and it never ceases to amaze me how he can get the absolute MOST out of each instrument. I swear, in the Final, Felix "glows" when those pedal trills appear, to say nothing of those wonderful descending "tootsie rolls". After a couple of standing ovations, Felix played the Gigue Fugue as his encore - quick, clean and crisp ! All in all the "Flying Fingers of Felix" totally captivated the entire crowd ( once again) and I'm sure he'll be back in Schenectady soon ! I had the great pleasure to meet Felix's Mother, who had just flown in from Germany that morning and had come directly from the airport to Schenectady. I'm sure that both Felix and Hans are happy she was able to cross the pond for a visit. I also bought Felix's latest CD ( a 2 cd set) of his live performance at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, NJ. recorded on Nov. 17 of last year. If Felix is playing anywhere near you - by all means - go hear him ! The direct link to his schedule is : http://www.felix-hell.com/eng/recitals/recitals03.htm   T H E O R G A N L.A. Carlson Company, 1977 GREAT 16' Quintaton 8' Prinzipal 8' Gedeckt 4' Oktave 4' Pommer 2' Super Oktave IV Mixture 8' Trumpet SWELL 8' Rohrflote 8' Salizional 8' Viox Celeste (TC) 4' Prinzipal 4' Nachthorn 2' Doublette IV Sharff 8' Oboe 4' Rohrschalmei POSITIVE 8' Singend Gedeckt 8' Dolce 8' Dolce Celeste (TC) 4' Spillflote 2' Blockflote 1-3/5' Quint 1' Sifflote III Cornet III Cymbal 8' Trompette ( GREAT) 4' Clarion (GREAT) PEDAL 32' Untersatz (resultant, I believe) 16' Prinzipal 16' Bourdon 16' Dulciana 8' Oktave 8' Boudon 4' Super Oktave 2' Flute a bec III Mixture 16' Trompette ECHO 8' Diapason 8' Stopped Flute 8' Genshorn 4' Octave 4' Gedeckt Flote 2' Fifteenth 8' English Horn  
(back) Subject: Re: TWO OR THREE MANUALS? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 16:04:18 EST     --part1_6f.36623fd6.2ba0fad2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 3/12/03 3:02:49 AM Eastern Standard Time, musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk writes:     > Tremolo ? For a Trio Sonata ? >   Sure... but if you play it fast enough you don't notice... ;-)   Gotta have trems on a Wurli!!! ;-)   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502     --part1_6f.36623fd6.2ba0fad2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 3/12/0=3D 3 3:02:49 AM Eastern Standard Time, musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Tremolo ? &nbsp;For a = Trio=3D20=3D Sonata ? <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>Sure... but if you play it fast enough you don't notice... &nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Gotta have trems on a Wurli!!! &nbsp;&nbsp;;-) <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Ac=3D res http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_6f.36623fd6.2ba0fad2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: TC Lewis From: "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 11:33:40 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00C5_01C2E954.6505D180 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Oh dear. Once again we have an absolutist statement.   "The fluework of Fr.Willis is the work of an amateur by comparison".   No it isn't. It is different. Yes, TC Lewis built wonderful organs. Yes Southwark Cathedral organ is magnificent. However, there are many other romantic organs as good as a TC Lewis organ. They will not be the same, = =3D but just as good. What a boring organ world it would be if all of the organs = =3D had been built by the same builder.   Alan Taylor London     > 100% accurate, Colin. I've already learned from this List, of course, = =3D that > we both regard T.C.Lewis as one of the greatest organbuilders who has = =3D ever > lived. And we do agree, also, that Lewis pipes are just as good amidst > aridity as reverberation. > Like Colin, I'm a Southwark fan, > Ross > > >If you want the best romantic organ sound in the > >world, study the work of Lewis. The fluework of > >Fr.Willis is the work of an amateur by comparison. > >Interestingly, the Lewis sound also seems to work >in relatively poor > acoustics. I have played a few T C > >Lewis instruments of modest proportions, often in > >buildings of no great size and without great > >resonance. The effect is as it should be.....pure > >music. > > >   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00C5_01C2E954.6505D180 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1141" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2><FONT size=3D3D3>Oh dear. Once again we have an =3D absolutist&nbsp;=3D20 statement.<BR><BR>"The fluework of Fr.Willis is the work of an amateur =3D by=3D20 comparison".<BR><BR>No it isn't. It is different. Yes, TC Lewis built =3D wonderful=3D20 organs. Yes<BR>Southwark Cathedral organ is magnificent. However, there = =3D are many=3D20 other<BR>romantic organs as good as a TC Lewis organ. They will not be =3D the same,=3D20 but<BR>just as good. What a boring organ world it would be if all of the = =3D organs=3D20 had<BR>been built by the same builder.<BR><BR>Alan=3D20 Taylor<BR>London<BR><BR><BR>&gt; 100% accurate, Colin. I've already =3D learned from=3D20 this List, of course, that<BR>&gt; we both regard T.C.Lewis as one of =3D the=3D20 greatest organbuilders who has ever<BR>&gt; lived. And we do agree, =3D also, that=3D20 Lewis pipes are just as good amidst<BR>&gt; aridity as =3D reverberation.<BR>&gt;=3D20 Like Colin, I'm a Southwark fan,<BR>&gt; Ross<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; &gt;If you = =3D want=3D20 the best romantic organ sound in the<BR>&gt; &gt;world, study the work =3D of Lewis.=3D20 The fluework of<BR>&gt; &gt;Fr.Willis is the work of an amateur by=3D20 comparison.<BR>&gt; &gt;Interestingly, the Lewis sound also seems to =3D work &gt;in=3D20 relatively poor<BR>&gt; acoustics. I have played a few T C<BR>&gt; =3D &gt;Lewis=3D20 instruments of modest proportions, often in<BR>&gt; &gt;buildings of no = =3D great=3D20 size and without great<BR>&gt; &gt;resonance. The effect is as it should = =3D   be.....pure<BR>&gt;=3D20 &gt;music.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;</FONT><BR></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00C5_01C2E954.6505D180--      
(back) Subject: Re: Scintillating in Schenectady From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 01:02:21 EST     --part1_180.17c6a522.2ba178ed_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Doug, for some reason the church in Oklahoma City where he played is not going to invite him back. They would not tell me why. It may have to do with his schedule. I sure enjoyed him at Messiah Lutheran Church. An = organ that was lacking, but he brought out the best with his creative registrations. I would travel all day just to hear him again. Let me = know when he is in this area. Lee   --part1_180.17c6a522.2ba178ed_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#400040" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Doug, for some reason the = church in=3D Oklahoma City where he played is not going to invite him back.&nbsp; They = w=3D ould not tell me why.&nbsp; It may have to do with his schedule.&nbsp; I = sur=3D e enjoyed him at Messiah Lutheran Church.&nbsp; An organ that was lacking, = b=3D ut he brought out the best with his creative registrations.&nbsp; I would = tr=3D avel all day just to hear him again.&nbsp; Let me know when he is in this = ar=3D ea.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_180.17c6a522.2ba178ed_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Kilgen Magnets From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 22:02:57 -0600   We are involved in a renovation of the c1933 Kilgen at St. Mary's Catholic in Fort Worth. The organ has been terribly neglected and butchered, but we have replaced many cut off pipes, and the organ is beginning to come back to life. We do need several magnets to replace dead ones. These are the brass screw-in type. If any one has a half dozen or so of these to sell, please let me know. Thanks! Roy Redman    
(back) Subject: Re: TCLewis From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 23:00:24 -0600   At 10:22 AM 3/13/03 +1300, you wrote: >100% accurate, Colin. I've already learned from this List, of course, = that >we both regard T.C.Lewis as one of the greatest organbuilders who has = ever >lived. And we do agree, also, that Lewis pipes are just as good amidst >aridity as reverberation. >Like Colin, I'm a Southwark fan,   Unfortunately, I've only been able to hear this raved-about instrument on the recent BBC Choral Evensong webcast... great sound, but what does it "feel" like in the room?   In my visit to the Isles in 1985 for the summer RSCM course, the cathedral =   instrument that most stood out for me was the Salisbury "Father" Willis - just a kind of "presence" in the room, a careful balance of brilliance and =   body that just worked beautifully. For any of you that have compared these =   two, what could you say?   (Unfortunately, missed out on Southwark "in the flesh" that year...)   John Seboldt Milwaukee