PipeChat Digest #3545 - Sunday, March 16, 2003
 
Lent II - St. Matthew's ACC - Newport Beach CA USA (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Fwd: [Theatreorgans-L] Free organ lessons
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Fwd: [Theatreorgans-L] Free organ lessons
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Console prices
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Console prices
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
RE: out-of-print Palm Sun. anthem (X-posted)
  by "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@msn.com>
Bunjes' Chant-Chorales
  by "Donald Pole" <pandk@ciaccess.com>
Easter Vocal Solo Search
  by "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net>
Re: Console prices
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "Elizabeth Kutz" <flutepipe@sbcglobal.net>
warning - brag :)
  by "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Lent II - St. Matthew's ACC - Newport Beach CA USA (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 07:13:34 -0800   Sung Mass at 9 a.m.   Hymn - Kind Maker of the World, O Hear - Jesu dulcis memoria (Andernach) Setting - Merbecke Gradual - Tribulationes - Tone 3 with fauxbourdons Tract - Confitemini - Tone 8 with fauxbourdons Offertory - Meditabor - C. Rossini / Clark Communion - Intellige - Healy Willan Hymn - My Faith Looks Up To Thee - Olivet Hymn - God Be In My Head - Lytlington Hymn - The Glory of These Forty Days - Spires   High Mass at 11 a.m.   Hymn - Kind Maker of the World, O Hear - Jesu dulcis memoria (Andernach) Introit - Reminiscere - Healy Willan Setting - Mass IX (Gregorian) Gradual - Tribulationes - Tone 3 Tract - Confitemini - Tone 8 Offertory - Meditabor - C. Rossini / Clark Communion - Intellige - Healy Willan Hymn - My Faith Looks Up To Thee - Olivet Hymn - God Be In My Head - Lytlington Hymn - The Glory of These Forty Days - Spires   No voluntaries.   It's been raining hard here for 24 hours ... getting to church is going to be INteresting ... we have flooding on all the major roads.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Fwd: [Theatreorgans-L] Free organ lessons From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 10:01:33 -0600   The following appeared on the TO list this morning. I thought it might be of interest to the members of this list.   David   >Star Ledger (Newark NJ) Sunday March 16, 2003 > >Free lessons offered to teens to solve shortage of church organists. > >BY G. JEFFREY MACDONALD >RELIGION NEWS SERVICE > >PORTSMOUTH, N.H.- Twelve-year-old Jennifer McPherson lives in southern >Maine, where organists are so hard to find that churches sometimes let = fine >organs sit silent as an Easter congregation sings along to a compact = disc. > >Jennifer would gladly help fix the problem in a few years by expanding = her >gifted repertoire of piano, violin and ukulele to include the organ, an >intriguing instrument for her "because of all the sounds it can make." > >There has been just one problem: Organ lessons cost at least $40 each, = and >her home-schooling family can't afford them. Yet, on a brisk Sunday >afternoon in February, resonant chords were filling St. John's Episcopal >Church here and the one sitting at the helm of the congregation's new, >$710,000 pipe organ was none other than Jennifer. She was taking her = fourth >lesson, courtesy of a unique program to revitalize church music by making >organ instruction free for young, promising musicians. > >"When I heard they were giving free lessons, I tried out right away = because >(lessons) are so pricey," Jennifer said. "I've always wanted to play the >organ and now I am." > >Lessons for Jennifer and six other students under age 17 are equipping a = new >generation of church organists, thanks to funding by the St. John's-based >Young Organists Collaborative. Each student takes eight lessons free, as = a >handful of benefactors pay instructors for their time and expertise. Some >teachers are donating extra time, giving students a much-needed boost on = a >notoriously complex musical instrument. > >Organist groups across the country have, in the past two decades, offered >showcase events for young people to explore the instrument, but none = before >now has offered free lessons to promising pianists, according to James >Thomashauer, executive director of the 20,000-member American Guild of >Organists. Because the Portsmouth idea has proved so popular with young >musicians, the Guild will soon feature the model in its regular >publications, he said, with hopes of reproducing it from coast to coast. > >"Free music lessons? That's special. That's really terrific," Thomashauer >said. "That really stretches the envelope from what's been done before." > >Churches nationwide have difficulty finding qualified organists any time = pay >rates fail to support a comfortable living, Thomashauer said. A handful = of >major churches in metropolitan areas attract Candidates in droves when = they >offer in the range of $100,000 for a full-time salary, but most >congregations can pay only a part-time wage for an organist's rehearsal = and >worship time. > >Small churches tend to offer between $50 and $100 for an organist's = Sunday >services. Such rates mean the market might be best filled by talented = youth. > >"That's not enough for an adult to live on, but that's a lot of money for = a >teenager," said Terrie Harman, Jennifer's organ instructor at St. John's. >And if that person is available for funerals and weddings, as well as = Sunday >worship, Harman says, he or she as an adult will be able to "earn a = complete >second living." > >Despite earning possibilities for hustling organists, young people seem = to >need fresh incentives to pursue proficiency in the field. In 1986, the >nation's music schools reported 728 organ majors among their students. By >2000, that number had dropped to 527. > >At the same time, churches -- especially in mainline Protestantism -- >continue to invest in organs as their musical centerpieces. Pipe organ >makers reported a backlog of orders in 2002 as congregations moved = forward >on their visions for the organ to endure as the definitive church sound = of >the 21st century, just as it was in the 18th century. > >"Pipe organs are found almost solely in churches, because they're the only >places big enough to hold them," said the Rev. Douglas E. Theuner, = Episcopal >bishop of New Hampshire, who gave $1,000 in seed money to start the >collaborative. "That makes the organ the unique sound of the church and >something the church can give to a whole community." > >"A lot of people tell me, 'I hear organ music and I get tears in my = eyes,'" >Harman said. "It's so primal. They cry, but they don't know why. There's >something really connective in hearing organ music. I think it's = connective >to spirit. In my own experience, it's the 'breath of God' blowing through >this elaborate wind instrument. > >Attracting interested young people has proven easier than expected. >Organizers at first thought one or two piano students might jump at organ >lessons, but instead seven signed up. Four more are on a waiting list to >begin in the fall. The main hurdle to addressing the shortage, it seems, = may >be psychological. The challenge is to enable young people to see = themselves >on a bench, filling a church with sound each week. > >"They picture a church organist as a large, old, grizzly, stodgy man who >they're afraid to approach as a child," said Judy Howard, a member of the >collaborative steering committee. > >"Or as a little old lady whose feet barely reach the pedals," said Helen >Gettehnan, also a committee member. What teenagers need, all agreed, is >adults to encourage them to step up, pull the stops and work the pedals >until the "king of instruments'' is singing at their touch. > > > >--Theatreorgans-L---------------------------------------------------- > > >This List Brought to you by http://Vintageorgans.com = Buy-Sell-Trade-Parts > for Vintage Hammond Organs >Organ Classified Ads http://theatreorgans.com/ads >Theatre Organ Home Page http://theatreorgans.com >Theatre Organ Mailing List Rules >and How to Unsubscribe http://theatreorgans.com/tolist.htm     -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Fwd: [Theatreorgans-L] Free organ lessons From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 11:36:14 -0500   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_11211202= =3D=3D.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   Free organ lessons for young budding organists.   Free organ lessons are a wonderful idea, - especially as it appears that there are enough younger people wanting to take them and that there is a waiting list.   It seems to me that this is the thing that needs to get well publicized, - =   back home in England it was, and may be still is, a regular thing that the =   church organist would have a student taking lessons, in return for the occasional service that he or she would cover from time to time.   It certainly was the case in the three churches in London that I was at, = in the 30's, 40's and 50's. I hope that they still do it now.   Bob Conway   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_11211202= =3D=3D.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"us-ascii"   <html> <body> <u>Free organ lessons for young budding organists.<br><br> </u>Free organ lessons are a wonderful idea, - especially as it appears that there are enough younger people wanting to take them and that there is a waiting list.<br><br> It seems to me that this is the thing that needs to get well publicized, - back home in England it was, and may be still is, a regular thing that the church organist would have a student taking lessons, in return for the occasional service that he or she would cover from time to time.<br><br> It certainly was the case in the three churches in London that I was at, in the 30's, 40's and 50's.&nbsp; I hope that they still do it now.<br><br> Bob Conway</body> <br> </html>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_11211202= =3D=3D.ALT--    
(back) Subject: Re: Console prices From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 12:20:08 -0500   Vern Jones said: > Just the bare necessities, a real good one is $20K or better. So a > gutted used one is probably closer to the $5k to $10K range.   Apples to oranges. This would be the price to run a pipe organ in a = church, not for a mass produced electronic organ for the home.   Besides, an organist who is looking for something to practice on at home = is generally willing to do without work-of-art furniture if the instrument is =   playable and at least reasonably close to AGO specs. Heck, many of them = are willing to put up with a 25 year old toaster (or worse) as long as it has = 2 manuals, pedals, makes noise and is cheap. 3 manuals are only a dream for =   them.   Moving drawknobs are a nice luxury but there are other options available. =   Even Allen and Rogers make models with lighted tabs. For that matter, = I've seen and played pipe organ consoles with lighted push-button stops. There = are at least two such by Steiner-Reck in Northern Virginia. (Very "modren" looking and totally appropriate for their settings.)   Stop tabs of various types have been with us for almost a hundred years = now. Combination actions are now electronic memory driven and cheaper to = produce, not to mention a whole lot more flexible.   Yes, I, too, like a traditional style console with movable draw-knobs with =   that wonderful "whumpf" sound when you change combinations, but it's not necessary for my home organ, and obviously not even _necessary_ for a = church organ.   All that aside, I personally believe that there may be a market here that American dealers have chosen to ignore or have convinced themselves that = it doesn't exist.   Again, my question still stands: How is it that the Europeans can do it = for their market and why are US dealers unable to?   tlw    
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 14:03:05 -0500   Vern Jones said: > What I'm trying to say, is if they turned out an instrument for $10K to > $15K, would you buy it?   WHY NOT ??   There _is_ a market for $10k to $15k cars. They don't have Corinthian = leather seats nor genuine wood panelling, but they get you where you need to go in = reasonable comfort. Not everyone can afford a Takoma or a BMW, or for = that matter, even wants one.   Considering that many organists content themselves with an ancient used electric organ for practice (toasters), why not? Why not spend only $10k = for an insturment with modern sound technology even if the console is only particle board with stop tabs instead of moving drawknobs - as long as it meets AGO specs? That as opposed to $30k to $60k, sure! Anyone willing = to practice on granny's old Balwin or Conn is certainly not a likely = candidate to buy a custom organ. A decent sounding, affordable practice organ, though, =   might be attractive to them.   I raised the same question a couple of years ago that Bill Raty has raised =   here. I don't think anyone is talking about a church installation at that =   price range, though no doubt some churches would try to make do with such. = However, a lot those churches currently have cheap used instruments, = anyway. But that's not the point.   The question remains, why can't dealers in the US market offer a decent = low budget instrument as the Europeans seem to be able to for their markets, especially given the cheap price of technology? The Europeans have = overhead costs to pay, also, and need to make a living, too.   tlw    
(back) Subject: Re: Console prices From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 11:55:51 -0800   I am working on the bare necessities, a nice set of AGO manuals with a = real wood frame with 2 MIDI output channels and internal MERGER to add the = pedals...Price, under $1K....you supply the Ahlborn, Viscount etc...I also have MIDI = encoders for the pedals...a real AGO practice instrument...   Vern   TommyLee Whitlock wrote:   > Vern Jones said: > > Just the bare necessities, a real good one is $20K or better. So a > > gutted used one is probably closer to the $5k to $10K range. > > Apples to oranges. This would be the price to run a pipe organ in a = church, > not for a mass produced electronic organ for the home. > > Besides, an organist who is looking for something to practice on at home = is > generally willing to do without work-of-art furniture if the instrument = is > playable and at least reasonably close to AGO specs. Heck, many of them = are > willing to put up with a 25 year old toaster (or worse) as long as it = has 2 > manuals, pedals, makes noise and is cheap. 3 manuals are only a dream = for > them. > > Moving drawknobs are a nice luxury but there are other options = available. > Even Allen and Rogers make models with lighted tabs. For that matter, = I've > seen and played pipe organ consoles with lighted push-button stops. = There are > at least two such by Steiner-Reck in Northern Virginia. (Very "modren" > looking and totally appropriate for their settings.) > > Stop tabs of various types have been with us for almost a hundred years = now. > Combination actions are now electronic memory driven and cheaper to = produce, > not to mention a whole lot more flexible. > > Yes, I, too, like a traditional style console with movable draw-knobs = with > that wonderful "whumpf" sound when you change combinations, but it's = not > necessary for my home organ, and obviously not even _necessary_ for a = church > organ. > > All that aside, I personally believe that there may be a market here = that > American dealers have chosen to ignore or have convinced themselves that = it > doesn't exist. > > Again, my question still stands: How is it that the Europeans can do it = for > their market and why are US dealers unable to? > > tlw > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: out-of-print Palm Sun. anthem (X-posted) From: "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@msn.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 15:06:30 -0500   Bud, I'm interested in a copy of the anthem, but the emails I send to you (quilisma@social.rr.com) keep bouncing back. Please contact me privately (markhopper@ncol.net) with you correct address.   Mark   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com Sent: Saturday, March 15, 2003 8:20 PM To: +mailing list, ANGLICAN-MUSIC; organchat; pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: out-of-print Palm Sun. anthem (X-posted)     It took a rainy Saturday afternoon, but I FINALLY put "Why Does He Seem To Be So Sad?" into Sibelius ... it's ... um ... kinda Gospel-ish (grin), but the text works PERFECTLY to make the transition from the Triumphal Entry to the first reading of the Passion on Palm Sunday.   If anybody wants it, msg. me pvt. and let me know whether you want PDFs or Sibelius files. If you're on my music download list, you don't have to do anything ... it goes out automatically.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Bunjes' Chant-Chorales From: "Donald Pole" <pandk@ciaccess.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 15:32:14 -0500       I found single copies of a couple of interesting choral arrangements by Paul Bunjes--he alternates verses of a canticle in plainchant with verses of a suitable hymn. I have the Chant-Chorale for Advent featuring the Benedictus, and the Christmas one featuring the Magnificat. These were published in 1960 by Concordia. I would like to know if there were others in this series, for example anything for Holy Week? Any information is appreciated.   Don   Organ Website- http://www.pandk.com  
(back) Subject: Easter Vocal Solo Search From: "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 12:55:45 -0800   A fellow organist is looking vocal solo for Easter called "Art Thou The Christ" (have no idea who the composer might be). It was in a big vocal solo book called possibly "152 (or l62) sacred solos. That book is = probably more than 30 years old. She asked me to ask around. Have any of you possible heard of it? Fran Meyers      
(back) Subject: Re: Console prices From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 15:18:34 -0600   TommyLee Whitlock wrote:   >Stop tabs of various types have been with us for almost a hundred years = now. >   Longer than that, actually. The earliest ones I know of were on the console of Robert Hope-Jones's organ at St. John's, Birkenhead, England, completed in 1891.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 14:18:36 -0800   My copy's at church, but I think it's in "Fifty-Two Sacred Songs You Like To Sing" (G. Schirmer, 1939, still in print as far as I know, or available from any large library).   Cheers,   Bud   John & Fran Meyers wrote: > > A fellow organist is looking vocal solo for Easter called "Art Thou The > Christ" (have no idea who the composer might be). It was in a big vocal > solo book called possibly "152 (or l62) sacred solos. That book is = probably > more than 30 years old. She asked me to ask around. Have any of you > possible heard of it? Fran Meyers > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "Elizabeth Kutz" <flutepipe@sbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 16:39:04 -0600   This post resounds with me at the moment. I am a multiple instrument player: piano, organ, flute, piccolo and oboe. I had a Conn that did = sound awful, but I could work on my playing techique at home, which is very important to me. I tried several electronic organ techs and no one was = able to work on it, in fact when I would leave a message with the information = of the organ being a Conn (ago pedalboard), often the message would not be answered. I recently bought a Baldwin640 with AGO specs at the "right" price that is digital, and guess what! I am getting the same messages when = I call techs. "I cannot get parts" "This organ is not built anymore, so I = do not work on that brand". Well, I do know a place where a tech can get parts, but that does not make a difference. I can not afford to purchase a 30 thousand dollar organ- believe me I would like to. Everyone knows what most organists get paid and it is not even enough to support yourself. In every other instrument that I own, they grow in value. The electronic = organ is about the same as a car as it drives off the sales lot -it loses value, also, with my other instruments I can always get repair service, even with my professional flute, that is about 50 years old. Besides sound, this is the thing that I hate about the electronic organ world. If an organ is off warranty, just buy another! For us without unlimited funds (most = organists) we are left in the wind to fend for our selves.   I have had to move several times across the US due to my husband's job. = Try to find a church to practice at in order to start auditioning at the new location. That is almost an impossibility - I have tried each time I have moved and gotten the same answers "This organ is very expensive, and only the organist can play on it" "It is inconvient for the secretary to let = you in", etc. I have a Masters in organ performance and that does not seem to make a difference. I just want an organ to practice on that is AGO spec. that makes a sound- but if you do not have 30 thousand dollars, forget it. There has to be a better way.   Elizabeth Kutz MM, CAGO flutepipe@sbcglobal.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 16, 2003 1:03 PM Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments?     > Vern Jones said: > > What I'm trying to say, is if they turned out an instrument for $10K = to > > $15K, would you buy it? > > WHY NOT ?? > > There _is_ a market for $10k to $15k cars. They don't have Corinthian leather > seats nor genuine wood panelling, but they get you where you need to go = in > reasonable comfort. Not everyone can afford a Takoma or a BMW, or for that > matter, even wants one. > > Considering that many organists content themselves with an ancient used > electric organ for practice (toasters), why not? Why not spend only = $10k for > an insturment with modern sound technology even if the console is only > particle board with stop tabs instead of moving drawknobs - as long as = it > meets AGO specs? That as opposed to $30k to $60k, sure! Anyone willing to > practice on granny's old Balwin or Conn is certainly not a likely candidate to > buy a custom organ. A decent sounding, affordable practice organ, = though, > might be attractive to them. > > I raised the same question a couple of years ago that Bill Raty has = raised > here. I don't think anyone is talking about a church installation at = that > price range, though no doubt some churches would try to make do with = such. > However, a lot those churches currently have cheap used instruments, anyway. > But that's not the point. > > The question remains, why can't dealers in the US market offer a decent low > budget instrument as the Europeans seem to be able to for their markets, > especially given the cheap price of technology? The Europeans have overhead > costs to pay, also, and need to make a living, too. > > tlw > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: warning - brag :) From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 17:11:47 -0600   Hello listmembers- I am such a proud mom. My daughter played the organ in church today for the first time and recieved a lot of compliments. (Its = not a pipe organ but maybe in the future!) She played "Tarantella" by Beaumont for the recessional. It is a piano piece but adapted well to the organ. = It has the automatic pedal on the bass notes which Cheryl thought sounded really neat. Good thing 'cause she is only 11 and can't reach the pedals! She has started playing the piano for Sunday school also. Thanks for listening. Amy Fleming    
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 15:26:25 -0800   You need to find an indie tech who likes to tinker ... I've been blessed with several in San Diego, Orange County, AND LA ... and they've resurrected old Hammonds, Conns, Baldwins, Allens, etc. for me.   Any tech attached to a music store is gonna want to sell you a new organ.   Teach yourself to tune analog organs. I did; that was basically all that was wrong with my old Conn. Old Conns and old Baldwins only had 12 generators ... one for all the Cs, one for all the Ds, etc. ... the big Conns had 24, I think ... one set for the Tibia unit and another for everything else.   Canned air (NOT WD-40) can do WONDERS for key contacts.   Out of print tech manuals are available from someplace, but I don't remember the name ... surely somebody on this list will.   "No parts" is a red herring, sometimes ... most of the stuff that DIES in those old organs can be had at RadShack, or be cannibalized off another organ.   It never hurts to rattle the FACTORY'S cage, if the company is still in business. THEY don't like unsatisfied customers (grin).   I had to deal with all of this out of NECESSITY because I played in poor churches that didn't have any MONEY (grin).   Keep an eye on Organ Clearing House for a 2-3-rank Moller Artiste, Wicks whatever, Kilgen Petite Ensemble, Kimball, etc. ... if one turns up CLOSE to you, it might be within your price range if you have the space, and some volunteer labor to do the scut work, like packing the pipes and taking down the cabinet. Let an organ-builder do the rest (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Elizabeth Kutz wrote: > > This post resounds with me at the moment. I am a multiple instrument > player: piano, organ, flute, piccolo and oboe. I had a Conn that did = sound > awful, but I could work on my playing techique at home, which is very > important to me. I tried several electronic organ techs and no one was = able > to work on it, in fact when I would leave a message with the information = of > the organ being a Conn (ago pedalboard), often the message would not be > answered. I recently bought a Baldwin640 with AGO specs at the "right" > price that is digital, and guess what! I am getting the same messages = when I > call techs. "I cannot get parts" "This organ is not built anymore, so I = do > not work on that brand". Well, I do know a place where a tech can get > parts, but that does not make a difference. I can not afford to purchase = a > 30 thousand dollar organ- believe me I would like to. Everyone knows = what > most organists get paid and it is not even enough to support yourself. = In > every other instrument that I own, they grow in value. The electronic = organ > is about the same as a car as it drives off the sales lot -it loses = value, > also, with my other instruments I can always get repair service, even = with > my professional flute, that is about 50 years old. Besides sound, this = is > the thing that I hate about the electronic organ world. If an organ is = off > warranty, just buy another! For us without unlimited funds (most = organists) > we are left in the wind to fend for our selves. > > I have had to move several times across the US due to my husband's job. = Try > to find a church to practice at in order to start auditioning at the new > location. That is almost an impossibility - I have tried each time I = have > moved and gotten the same answers "This organ is very expensive, and = only > the organist can play on it" "It is inconvient for the secretary to let = you > in", etc. I have a Masters in organ performance and that does not seem = to > make a difference. I just want an organ to practice on that is AGO spec. > that makes a sound- but if you do not have 30 thousand dollars, forget = it. > There has to be a better way. > > Elizabeth Kutz MM, CAGO