PipeChat Digest #3547 - Monday, March 17, 2003
 
Re: Why not budget home instruments?(long)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "Bob North" <bnorth@intergate.ca>
Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search
  by "Eric McKirdy" <eric@jazzyeric.com>
Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments?(long) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 23:38:04 EST     --part1_1e3.499efc5.2ba6ab2c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Practice Organs:   It depends upon what you are looking for, your budget, need for relyability. Should I buy new or used? Buying a used organ, you want to be secure in the fact that local tech's can work on them, and parts are available. Service calls can be expensive, so you want a relyable product. Get some advice, not opinions, advice from knowledgeable people in the profession that you know. When buying a new organ, make sure tech support is available to you down the line when you will need it.   Most of all have your expectations in line with the product you choose. Purchase the spec. and service manual and keep it handy when you may need service. Your tech may be grateful you have one. It's not always possible for him to stock them all or economically feasable. It's also worth noting that analog tech's who have been in business for years and worked off and on for several product lines are getting to retirement age or already have. Churches that have purchased custom models in the 50's 60's and 70's are selling them. Beware that the components take remarkable amounts of space, cabling and wireing. If you have a large basement that is empty, you have it made. Offer in hundreds not thousands for these, most are not worth over $700.   There is also the organ remanufaturers, that will take a non working organ with good keyboards, and console and place all new digital parts in it. There are several on this list that will do a good job at a reasonable price. These are custom jobs, so you can have anything you want within reason and your budget. Phoenix, Emminent, Musicom, Copeman Hart, and if I left anybody out, chime in, I can't remember all the names out there. What you'll get is essentially a new organ in a used cabinet, but the shells can be reworked to look like new too.   If you are handy and like tracker, Estey and other reed organ Mfg.s built church organs. Find one in good condition for $500. and work on it yourself if you are handy. I had one for 22 years and played the stuffing out of it, and it was still playing when I sold it. You can't kill them. Terrific for finger strength.   Buy a new one, and delay buying a new car for three years. Some of the best deals can be had outside the big two, if you don't reqire solid wood consoles. Home organs don't get the same wear and tear churches give organs. And then there is Allen and Rodgers. It's really up to you, what you want to pay, but these are the electronic alternatives.   Then there is the small used pipe organ. This takes the skill of a seasoned pipe organ tech to give proper advice. I personally would look for a Wicks foreward three or four, or a Martini, or a reasonably new Moeller, or a Kilgen ensamble in that order. There, you thought I was never going to get to it did you? Unit organs have their place. I would retune one to tartini/valloti because of the unit mutations, which will sound better in tune, and you can play in all keys. Once you do this you'll never go back to equal, you won't ever want to. These can be voiced to sound magnificent in a small room.   It's your call, and your choice!   Ron Severin   --part1_1e3.499efc5.2ba6ab2c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Practice Organs:<BR> <BR> It depends upon what you are looking for, your budget, need for<BR> relyability. Should I buy new or used? Buying a used organ, you<BR> want to be secure in the fact that local tech's can work on them,<BR> and parts are available. Service calls can be expensive, so you<BR> want a relyable product. Get some advice, not opinions, advice<BR> from knowledgeable people in the profession that you know.<BR> When buying a new organ, make sure tech support is available<BR> to you down the line when you will need it.<BR> <BR> Most of all have your expectations in line with the product you = choose.<BR> Purchase the spec. and service manual and keep it handy when you<BR> may need service. Your tech may be grateful you have one. It's not<BR> always possible for him to stock them all or economically feasable.<BR> It's also worth noting that analog tech's who have been in business<BR> for years and worked off and on for several product lines are getting<BR> to retirement age or already have. Churches that have purchased <BR> custom models in the 50's 60's and 70's are selling them. Beware<BR> that the components take remarkable amounts of space, cabling<BR> and wireing. If you have a large basement that is empty, you have it <BR> made. Offer in hundreds not thousands for these, most are not worth<BR> over $700.<BR> <BR> There is also the organ remanufaturers, that will take a non working <BR> organ with good keyboards, and console and place all new digital<BR> parts in it. There are several on this list that will do a good job at<BR> a reasonable price. These are custom jobs, so you can have anything<BR> you want within reason and your budget. Phoenix, Emminent, Musicom,<BR> Copeman Hart, and if I left anybody out, chime in, I can't remember<BR> all the names out there. What you'll get is essentially a new organ<BR> in a used cabinet, but the shells can be reworked to look like new = too.<BR> <BR> If you are handy and like tracker, Estey and other reed organ Mfg.s<BR> built church organs. Find one in good condition for $500. and work<BR> on it yourself if you are handy. I had one for 22 years and played<BR> the stuffing out of it, and it was still playing when I sold it. You = can't<B=3D R> kill them. Terrific for finger strength.<BR> <BR> Buy a new one, and delay buying a new car for three years. Some of the<BR> best deals can be had outside the big two, if you don't reqire solid = wood<BR=3D > consoles. Home organs don't get the same wear and tear churches<BR> give organs. And then there is Allen and Rodgers. It's really up to<BR> you, what you want to pay, but these are the electronic alternatives.<BR> <BR> Then there is the small used pipe organ. This takes the skill of a <BR> seasoned pipe organ tech to give proper advice. I personally<BR> would look for a Wicks foreward three or four, or a Martini, or<BR> a reasonably new Moeller, or a Kilgen ensamble in that order. There,<BR> you thought I was never going to get to it did you? Unit organs<BR> have their place. I would retune one to tartini/valloti because of the<BR> unit mutations, which will sound better in tune, and you can play in<BR> all keys. Once you do this you'll never go back to equal, you won't<BR> ever want to. These can be voiced to sound magnificent in a small = room.<BR> <BR> It's your call, and your choice!<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1e3.499efc5.2ba6ab2c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "Bob North" <bnorth@intergate.ca> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 20:54:38 -0800   At 02:03 PM 3/16/03 -0500, you wrote: >Vern Jones said: > > What I'm trying to say, is if they turned out an instrument for $10K = to > > $15K, would you buy it? > >WHY NOT ?? >I too have wondered why not. You see keyboards for sale, with midi, = from >$350 and up. I have often wondered why a manufacturer couldnt put 2 of >these keyboards together as in a great and a swell, in a welded steel >frame, with a pedal board, add an amp and some speakers for a reasonable >price. Yes, you would need a volume of sales to support such a venture, >has this art shrunk to such a small size that we couldnt support the sale =   >of say 200 units a year? Small churches, chapels, students? Just my >thoughts................Bob      
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 01:06:58 EST     --part1_1f1.47aede3.2ba6c002_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Has anyone heard or used O DIVINE REDEEMER (Gounod) for Easter?   Dale Rider Independence, MO   --part1_1f1.47aede3.2ba6c002_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Times New Roman" LANG=3D3D"0">Has anyone heard or used O DIVINE REDEEMER = (Goun=3D od) for Easter?<BR> <BR> Dale Rider<BR> Independence, MO</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1f1.47aede3.2ba6c002_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search From: "Eric McKirdy" <eric@jazzyeric.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 22:11:20 -0800   Absolutely. I have an SATB version of it, and the vocal solo. I rotate = them in every third or fourth Easter.     On 3/16/03 10:06 PM, ProOrgo53@aol.com said something about:   > Has anyone heard or used O DIVINE REDEEMER (Gounod) for Easter? > > Dale Rider > Independence, MO >    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter Vocal Solo Search From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 22:20:39 -0800   "O grant me pardon and remember not my sins" ... more appropriate for Lent, I'd think ...   Cheers,   Bud   ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote: > > Has anyone heard or used O DIVINE REDEEMER (Gounod) for Easter? > > Dale Rider > Independence, MO