PipeChat Digest #3549 - Monday, March 17, 2003
 
Re: Free organ lessons
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Recital Mar. 19, Noon, Philadelphia
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Books
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: T.C. Lewis
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Lewis v Willis  (6-4 odds on)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: TCLewis
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: T.C. Lewis
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: T.C. Lewis
  by "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com>
Cullercoates
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Free organ lessons From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 17:52:01 EST     --part1_6f.3693b4c7.2ba7ab91_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I have offered to give organ/piano lessons free to anyone in the = congregation who wants them. Right now I have a very talented organ student, the only organ student in Chickasha (I think, and if anyone is in Chickasha, please =   don't flame me, just correct me). The University has an Allen organ in = the Chapel, but no interest among the students to study. It isn't even listed = in the schedule of classes. Since the piano professor is also an organist, I =   would think he would advocate for organ students. I won't go into the = trends in church music in this part of the country, as you already know, but that =   doesn't mean students shouldn't learn the organ. I am giving a lecture/recital in September and am going to invite the young people of = the community. By the way, I have a new interest -- that of theater organ = music. I went to my first theater organ concert last weekend (yes, I played = hookey from church), and I was overwhelmed. Enough said. I am sure all of you = know more about it than I. Lee   --part1_6f.3693b4c7.2ba7ab91_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#400040" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">I have offered to give = organ/piano=3D20=3D lessons free to anyone in the congregation who wants them.&nbsp; Right now = I=3D have a very talented organ student, the only organ student in Chickasha = (I=3D20=3D think, and if anyone is in Chickasha, please don't flame me, just correct = me=3D ).&nbsp; The University has an Allen organ in the Chapel, but no interest = am=3D ong the students to study.&nbsp; It isn't even listed in the schedule of = cla=3D sses.&nbsp; Since the piano professor is also an organist, I would think = he=3D20=3D would advocate for organ students.&nbsp; I won't go into the trends in = churc=3D h music in this part of the country, as you already know, but that doesn't = m=3D ean students shouldn't learn the organ.&nbsp; I am giving a = lecture/recital=3D20=3D in September and am going to invite the young people of the = community.&nbsp;=3D By the way, I have a new interest -- that of theater organ music.&nbsp; I = w=3D ent to my first theater organ concert last weekend (yes, I played hookey = fro=3D m church), and I was overwhelmed.&nbsp; Enough said.&nbsp; I am sure all = of=3D20=3D you know more about it than I.&nbsp; Lee</FONT></HTML>   --part1_6f.3693b4c7.2ba7ab91_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Recital Mar. 19, Noon, Philadelphia From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 18:20:43 -0500   You are invited to a short recital that I will give in the church's noon-hour Lenten series this Wednesday, Mar. 19 at Arch Street = Presbyterian church (between 17th and 18th streets, just northwest of City Hall, in the Logan Square area).   This program will consist of the Trois Danses, by Jehan Alain. I would = like to play the second movement (captioned "to honor a hero's memory") in = memory of the crew of the Columbia.   The organ is a three-manual Austin of approx. 50 ranks, rebuilt by Brant Duddy in a French-influenced manner. This is the kind of repertoire that = it plays best.      
(back) Subject: Books From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 19:08:17 EST     --part1_7f.34497049.2ba7bd71_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   I know this doesn't have anything to do with organ music, but it does contemporary music, in general.   In unpacking another box of books I found a first edition in mint = condition of ESSAYS BEFORE A SONATA (a preface or reason for composing the Second Pianoforte Sonata --"Concord, Mass., 1845." ) This, of course, is by = Charles Ives.   The note before the Essays is as follows:   "These prefactory essays were written by the composer for those who can't stand his music -- and the music for those who can't stand his essays; to those who can't stand either, the whole is respectfully dedicated."   With his sense of humor, I am sure in much of his music he was "making = fun" of musicians writing music to please the public and make money (but still starving), while he was sitting in his plush chair in his insurance agency =   writing what he wanted, without caring what anyone thought.   Lee (In full flameproof attire)   --part1_7f.34497049.2ba7bd71_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#400040" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D =3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">I know this doesn't have = anything t=3D o do with organ music, but it does contemporary music, in general.&nbsp; = <BR=3D > <BR> In unpacking another box of books I found a first edition in mint = condition=3D20=3D of ESSAYS BEFORE A SONATA (a preface or reason for composing the Second = Pian=3D oforte Sonata --"Concord, Mass., 1845." ) This, of course, is by Charles = Ive=3D s.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> The note before the Essays is as follows:<BR> <BR> "These prefactory essays were written by the composer for those who can't = st=3D and his music -- and the music for those who can't stand his essays; to = thos=3D e who can't stand either, the whole is respectfully dedicated."<BR> <BR> With his sense of humor, I am sure in much of his music he was "making = fun"=3D20=3D of musicians writing music to please the public and make money (but still = st=3D arving), while he was sitting in his plush chair in his insurance agency = wri=3D ting what he wanted, without caring what anyone thought. <BR> <BR> Lee (In full flameproof attire)<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_7f.34497049.2ba7bd71_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 19:20:45 -0500   Arie said: > There is product out there at $10,000 (USD). > The following manufacturers have them > Ahlborn-Galanti -model SL 250 (a nice classical sounding organ, > which can be voiced) > Johannus - Opus line, maybe even the whole line for under $10,000 > Church Organ Systems (Viscount) - Models 401, 402 etc. > Rodgers 527 ? - I don't know about this one, but probably retails > for around $10,000 in the U.S.   Thanks, Arie! This is very useful information and it addresses Bill's original question. It's good to know that there are other brands out = there besides brands "A" and "R" with good products and at budget prices.   Then Arie said: > BUT, I think I know where this is going, > Why can't we get a decent looking, non-budget electronic organ that > sounds like a $50,000 for $10,000.   And you would be wrong. Yeah, that's a nice fantasy, but I don't think = anyone is expecting moving wooden drawknobs and/or fancy woodwork made of exotic woods for $10k to $15k any more than someone buying a KIA or Saturn = expects to get a Mercedes. Remember, we're talking about the poor folks out there = who have made do with an old toaster just so they could get some practice time = in but might like better if they could find something affordable. Would they =   buy? Well, I did.   So what do folks want for 10k - 15k? AGO specs? Here in the US, Yes. Serviceable? Yes. Dependable? Absolutely. Decent sounding? Well, why not =   great sounding, considering the advances in electronics, sampling, etc.? Finely appointed console? Not necessary! (Another consideration might be "will it fit through my front door" <G>) Several of the detractors seem = to be hung up on looks without consideration to the other qualities.   I own a Johannus and I am very happy with it, especially considering what = a comparable brand A or brand R would have cost me. I think it sounds = better than a lot of brand "A" and "R" that I have played and is much more = versatile. The advances in sound technology within just the last few years is = certainly impressive.   Also, Arie, in response to your "BRAND NEW" American Classic Johannus for = sale on churchorgantrader.com, there is also an Allen Renaissance R370 offered = for almost half original price and a Rogers 905B, only 2 years old, including = 8 speakers for a very low price (I don't know list on it). What does that prove?   Someone else also mentioned off-list that the European models on the web = sites I supplied are "stripped down". I would question what that means. I read =   French and German very well and there are only 2 major differences that I = can determine. The first is that the Euro versions are supplied with 30 note = BDO pedalboard (AGO optional, though) and that they don't offer as many thumb = and toe combination pistons as the American versions. I don't believe that = these 2 put together really justify the US prices being double the European = models. (Besides, for home practice, do we really need that many pistons?)   My whole point was in answer to Bill Raty's original question. Is it possible? Yes it is. The Europeans have proven so and, detracters aside, =   there is a market there. They're not luxury models, but they meet a need. = Can it be done here? That depends. Is there a viable market here and who =   determines the market?   I think I'm finished with this thread. I, at least, have beat this horse = more than enough. <VBG>   Cheers, TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Re: T.C. Lewis From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 01:53:20 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Southwark.....Harrison & Harrison took very great care with the restoration. They are currently taking very great care with the restoration of the Armley Schulze.   Fortunately, enough original T C Lewis work remains elsewhere which enabled H & H to study things very closely in unaltered form. Southwark is a national treasure.   Kelvingrove I have never heard, but it has a good reputation.   Newcastle Cathedral....a very large organ by UK standards, is mostly Lewis with additions by Nicholson. That too is an impressive instrument in a none too resonant building.   It's funny how things go full circle. There was a time when Lewis was just disregarded as being "old fashioned".   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Yes, Southwark is a dramatic and brilliant > instrument, although I believe > it has been through some alterations and an > attempted return to its original > state   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 21:09:44 -0500   Does anyone in the USA really want one of those European models ? Remember that it has the flat, short pedalboard, only internal speakers = and no divisional capture systems. If so, it is perfectly alright for you to go and visit one of those Euro dealers and purchase the instrument of your choice at the low web prices posted. The dealer will want 50% up front on the spot, you fly back home, then 2 months later he will call you that your organ is ready to be picked up and pay for the other 50%. You need to fly back there or pay someone else to = do the items below.   Now YOU need to make arrangements and pay for those up front, the thing needs to be crated for ocean shipping, boat arrangements, trucking arrangements, the USA government wants their taxes for duty, excise and others before they release it to you. (Lots of forms to fill out) By the time you get the thing home (one month later) and add up your = overall cost, you could have bought the same (better) AGO version right here at = home for the same US $ as now quoted by the US dealers. With all that, you = would still save substantially over what is available from other US made manufacturers.   Why are US organs made for the US market not at about 1/2 price of what a Euro comparable import costs in the US ? This is the original question in reverse. Can you detect some price gouging here perhaps ?   Note: The USA dealer who is importing Euro instruments has all those expenses to pay for as well, with the exception of flying back and forth = of course.   However, if there is genuine interest here in wanting to purchase the Euro versions of the Johannus organs, please email me privately and we will = find out if that is possible through the dealer network. Thanks.   Gary     ----- Original Message ----- From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 7:20 PM Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments?     > Arie said: > > There is product out there at $10,000 (USD). > > The following manufacturers have them > > Ahlborn-Galanti -model SL 250 (a nice classical sounding organ, > > which can be voiced) > > Johannus - Opus line, maybe even the whole line for under $10,000 > > Church Organ Systems (Viscount) - Models 401, 402 etc. > > Rodgers 527 ? - I don't know about this one, but probably retails > > for around $10,000 in the U.S. > > Thanks, Arie! This is very useful information and it addresses Bill's > original question. It's good to know that there are other brands out there > besides brands "A" and "R" with good products and at budget prices. > > Then Arie said: > > BUT, I think I know where this is going, > > Why can't we get a decent looking, non-budget electronic organ that > > sounds like a $50,000 for $10,000. > > And you would be wrong. Yeah, that's a nice fantasy, but I don't think anyone > is expecting moving wooden drawknobs and/or fancy woodwork made of = exotic > woods for $10k to $15k any more than someone buying a KIA or Saturn expects to > get a Mercedes. Remember, we're talking about the poor folks out there who > have made do with an old toaster just so they could get some practice = time in > but might like better if they could find something affordable. Would = they > buy? Well, I did. > > So what do folks want for 10k - 15k? AGO specs? Here in the US, Yes. > Serviceable? Yes. Dependable? Absolutely. Decent sounding? Well, why = not > great sounding, considering the advances in electronics, sampling, etc.? > Finely appointed console? Not necessary! (Another consideration might = be > "will it fit through my front door" <G>) Several of the detractors seem to be > hung up on looks without consideration to the other qualities. > > I own a Johannus and I am very happy with it, especially considering = what a > comparable brand A or brand R would have cost me. I think it sounds better > than a lot of brand "A" and "R" that I have played and is much more versatile. > The advances in sound technology within just the last few years is certainly > impressive. > > Also, Arie, in response to your "BRAND NEW" American Classic Johannus = for sale > on churchorgantrader.com, there is also an Allen Renaissance R370 = offered for > almost half original price and a Rogers 905B, only 2 years old, = including 8 > speakers for a very low price (I don't know list on it). What does that > prove? > > Someone else also mentioned off-list that the European models on the web sites > I supplied are "stripped down". I would question what that means. I = read > French and German very well and there are only 2 major differences that = I can > determine. The first is that the Euro versions are supplied with 30 = note BDO > pedalboard (AGO optional, though) and that they don't offer as many = thumb and > toe combination pistons as the American versions. I don't believe that these > 2 put together really justify the US prices being double the European models. > (Besides, for home practice, do we really need that many pistons?) > > My whole point was in answer to Bill Raty's original question. Is it > possible? Yes it is. The Europeans have proven so and, detracters = aside, > there is a market there. They're not luxury models, but they meet a = need. > Can it be done here? That depends. Is there a viable market here and = who > determines the market? > > I think I'm finished with this thread. I, at least, have beat this = horse more > than enough. <VBG> > > Cheers, > TommyLee > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Lewis v Willis (6-4 odds on) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 02:52:21 +0000 (GMT)   Hello (Rolling sleeves up!)   OK, I concede an unfortunate use of the word amateur in my reference to Willis!   I was organist of St.Augustine's, Kilburn, London (Fr Wilis) for about a year, and I happen to know that John has a very high regard for that particular instrument.   Perhaps I should explain the word "amateur".   Prior to Willis, we had, in the UK, just the one organ builder....Snetzler! Everyone had copied, re-copied, re-built and copied, copied and re-built....Snetzler.   Nothing had moved much for about 100 years....look at the York Minster fiasco, when Eliott & Hill created a totally ineffective organ which, following enlargements, had ten ( I repeat ten) 4ft Principals on just the Great Organ.   Gray & Davison were probably in the same mould to some extent.....organs of no great power which were slightly romanticised versions of Snetzler. Willis served his time with G & D.   What did Willis do when he became a self-employed organ-builder?   He used thin scaling but upped the wind pressures....hence W T Best's complaints about the "Gambas" at the Royal Albert Hall which Willis called Diapasons.   Now.....Fr Willis was a superb organ-builder of course, but his knowledge was that of a thoroughly English organ-builder. Cavaille-Coll didn't rate his organ for St.George's Hall, Liverpoool.   Of course, like Cavaille-Coll, Henry Willis was a very skilled reed voicer, a clever engineer and a very good craftsman. He synthesised a new sound (a fairly "factory" sound it has to be said) from his knowledge of harmonium/organ reed voicing, his work with Gray & Davison and his knowledge of French Organs which, during his lifetime, became quite popular in the North of England. It was a happy synthesis which suited the mood of the day and the requirements of Anglican Music.   The fact that he was a crook and a con-man is neither here nor there, but I thought I would just mention it!   :)   Did Willis know anything about the wider world of organ-building I wonder?   Now take T C Lewis......   He absolutely fell in love with the imported sound of Schulze, and especially the organ of Doncaster Parish Church. In fact, he suggested that he was the greatest organ builder/voicer of all time. The Schulze phenomenon took total control of organ-building in the North of England.......one Anglican Vicar suggested that Schulze had more disciples than Jesus himself! The list is endless....Pendlebury, Brindley & Foster, Binns, Forster & Andrews, Albert Keats etc etc   In fact, all they did was to increase the scales of the large Open Diapasons, and pretend that they were copying the work of the master!   I wonder what Willis would have done had a Schulze organ been installed in a large London Church, and caused the same enthusiast idolisation?   I know not the mechanism or thought processes in the head of T C Lewis, but what I do know is that he was so overawed by Schulze, he went away and created a new sound, never heard before from an English organ-builder......but it wasn't truly Schulze.   He obviously studied Schulze carefully, and had a phenomenal musical ear which probably matched that of Schulze himself......or was it even better? Could it be?   Consider the comments about the Schulze organ now in Armley Parish Church when it left its original home in a house in Leeds, to be re-assembled in Harrogate Parish Church. It was overloud, ill-suited to the church and apparently not a very pleasant experience. Only when it was later taken away and installed in a massive stone church with considerable resonance, did it begin to sound fantastic. So what must it have sounded like in a garden shed? (Some shed!)   For me, Doncaster is a far greater achievement, given the lack of resonance in that vast building.   Lewis abviously agreed with me.   So Lewis, from acoustic memory, took with him the Schulze sound, but he didn't copy or con people into thinking he was creating a Schulze style of organ. Instead, he used his ears, his knowledge, his skill, and created a UK-Schulze sound which is utterly breathtaking in its eloquence. If there is but one weakness, it is to be found in the over-use of metal Lieblich Gedackts....a popular feature of Schulze organs, which had never been heard before.   Lewis used his ears wonderfully; carefully matching each pipe to each situation. He neither followed the factory approach of Willis, nor the standard brightness of Schulze. He did this with uniformly low wind pressures, with generous basses and meticulous attention to voicing detail.   I hope this explains why I referred to Willis as an amateur!   What I perhaps should have said, was that Willis was good at what he did.....again, and again, and again.   Lewis was much more discerning and far better versed in the wider aspects of organ-building, but sadly, his "German style" of doing things fell out of favour, to be replaced by the weightier sounds and the potent reeds of Willis.   English organ building probably went into stagnation at that point for a period of about 60 years.   Only now are we re-discovering the beautiful sounds of Lewis, and appreciating them for what they are....works of genius.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- John Foss <harfo32@hotmail.com> wrote:   > No Colin. I disagree. Lewis was a good builder but > not better than Willis > (Father). Have you played Haverstock Hill? St Benet > Fink's Tottenham? and > others - Oxford Town Hall and so on. > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >                       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: TCLewis From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 03:10:47 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Abbott & Smith.... a fascinating organ builder.   There are just TWO (to the best of my knowledge) fully original Isaac Abbot organs, one of which is virtually on my doorstep at Queensbury Parish Church, donated by John Foster, the mill-owner who founded the world famous "Black Dyke Mills Band". It is a stupendous 3 -manual instrument.....but not over powerful. It is in a church with almost zilch resonance, but it is gorgeous.   I seem to recall reading somewhere, that Isaac Abbott was articled to William Hill.   The history of Abbott & Smith is seldom mentioned, but they built some wonderful instruments tonally. Sadly, they went in for quite complicated pneumatic-actions in later years, and the cost of re-building them has meant that many have been scrapped. Those that survive are fine sounding organs, but increasingly romantic as time marched on in the history of this company.   I recall playing the magnificent organ of Ossett Parish Church, and my first thought was, "These Orchestral Reeds are the equal of Fr Willis".   Strangely enough, their fluework, although with restricted Mixture stops, is often "on edge" and close to overblowing........it is often a bright and attractive sound......perhaps a hint of Schulze there, but obviously speaking on more robust pressure.   I know that Malcolm Wechsler has a high regard for Abbott & Smith, and has referred affectionately to a small, two manual instrument he knew in the UK.   I also have a little two manual favourite by the same company, which I hope is still in Ripley Parish Church, nr.Harrogate.   I must re-read the book about Northern UK organ-builders by Dr Nicholas Thistlethwaite.......I can't recall how much he said about A & S of Leeds, but they certainly did a lot of work in their heyday.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- Ross & Lynda Wards <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote: There is a host of lesser > lights in addition to the > ones you mention, with people like Abbott & Smith, > Wadsworth, Holdich.......etc   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: T.C. Lewis From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 21:09:59 -0600   One of Lewis's finest and least altered instruments is the relatively = small organ in St. Andrew's Church, Cullercoats, Tyne & Wear, built in 1885. = The stop list is:   PEDAL:   16' Open Diapason 16' Sub Bass 8' Octave (ext.) 8' Bass Flute (ext.) 16' Posaune (prepared for)   GREAT:   16' Bourdon 8' Open Diapason I 8 Open Diapason II (added later) 8' Lieblich Gedact 8' Salicional 4' Octave 4' Flute Harmonique 2.2/3' Twelfth 2' Fifteenth Mixture IV 8' Trumpet 8 8' Clarionet   SWELL:   16' Lieblich Gedackt 8' Geigen Principal 8' Rohr Flute 8' Viole da Gambe 8' Voix Celestes (T.C.) 4' Geigen Principal 2' Flautina 8' Horn 8' Oboe Tremulant   This may not look much on paper, but the treatment of the Diapason chorus = is quite amazing and the Flute Harmonique has to be heard to be believed!   John Speller        
(back) Subject: Re: T.C. Lewis From: "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 14:15:20 +1100   You seem to forget that the best TC Lewis organ of them all is the one in St Paul's Cathedral in Melbourne, Australia. It was recently restored by Harrison and Harrison and is one of the best cathedral organs you could with to find. It was lucky not to have been altered over the years. A floating Solo division had been added, but this was removed in the restoration with only a 32' reed (Lewis design) and a large Solo Reed added to the original specification. Having heard both Southwark and Melbourne (and played the Melbourne organ for services), I don't think there is any comparison.   When it comes to Willis organs, my vote would go to Salisbury which I was fortunate to play for a week for all services. When it comes to "altered" Willis organs, my vote would go to St Paul's, London - it was sheer fun playing that instrument in that acoustic.   Cheers,   Mark   Sydney Cathedral.    
(back) Subject: Cullercoates From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 03:18:46 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I played it!   Superb instrument for its size. There is a similar instrument in a huge marble acoustic at Studley Royal church, next to Fountains Abbey. Recently re-built, it is quite astonishing for its size.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote: > One of Lewis's finest and least altered instruments > is the relatively small > organ in St. Andrew's Church, Cullercoats, Tyne & > Wear, built in 1885.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com