PipeChat Digest #3551 - Tuesday, March 18, 2003
 
Melbourne Cathedral
  by "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com>
Review:  Olivier Latry Masterclass in NYC
  by <OrganNYC@aol.com>
TC Lewis
  by "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk>
OHS Convention June 19-26 Registration
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Re: Why not budget home instruments?
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
All the Stops by Craig Whitney
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Lighter and Irreverent Organ history 03
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Old Roman Catholic Hymn Search (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Melbourne Cathedral From: "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 21:18:33 +1100     On Tuesday, Mar 18, 2003, at 21:00 Australia/Sydney, PipeChat wrote:   > > How does the sound "get round the corner" into the nave and travel to=20=   > the > west end of that long nave? Effectively?   This is a problem, but not such a problem as I found walking around=20 Southwark cathedral when the organ was being demonstrated by Harry=20 Bramma. Southwark reminded me of Goulburn Cathedral here in NSW where=20=   their Foster & Andrew's is in a similar position and you can't hear the=20=   true full organ anywhere in the building - ie the Great is too loud or=20=   the Choir/Swell is louder than the Great etc. At least in Melbourne,=20 the whole organ speaks across the nave from the Southern transept (as=20 is the case here in Sydney too with the Hill/L=E9tourneau). Obviously=20=   the organ doesn't sound its best down the back of the nave as the sound=20=   has dropped off, but up the front and in the choir, it is truly=20 magnificent. For once, I think the best place to hear the Melbourne=20 Lewis is at the console.   As far as spiders go, I have never seen a Funnel Web spider outside a=20 display in a zoo and I actually lived for about 20 years in the area=20 where they are most abundant in the world! As for kangaroos (hopping=20 down our main streets), Colin is beginning to sound more like an=20 American every day with that kind of comment! :-) I thought they were=20 the only ones to believe such myths! :-) The Poms should know better!   Cheers,   Mark        
(back) Subject: Review: Olivier Latry Masterclass in NYC From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 05:27:12 EST     --part1_107.20d94d31.2ba84e80_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   On Monday night, March 17, four NYC Chapter Members performed for = Olivier=3D20 Latry at St. Jean Baptiste Church. Latry offered many insights into=3D20 performance practice of the French Symphonic repertoire, and seemed at = home=3D20 in the splendid acoustic of St. Jean Baptiste. Some of us had never = really=3D20 thought about the Franck Pastorale having an "l'orage" section, or that = the=3D20 best way to perform Tournemire was to dig in an be wild and "break the = organ=3D "=3D20 based on Tournemire's playing style and personality? We heard great=3D20 anecdotes about Durufle and Tournemire, and bon mots about how the = pedal=3D20 stops really speak (or don't) at Notre Dame. You had to be there!=3D20   The fabulous performers included Steven Laplante - St. Athanasius, = Brooklyn=3D20=3D -=3D20 (Allegro from Symphonie VI by Charles-Marie Widor); Jennifer Pascual = -=3D20 Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, Newark, NJ - (Choral-Improvisation sur le = "V ictim=3DE6 paschali" by Charles Tournemire); Douglas Keilitz - Episcopal = Churc=3D h,=3D20 Allentown, PA - (Pastorale by Cesar Franck); and Terence Flanagan - = Fifth=3D20 Avenue Presbyterian Church - (Berceuse =3DE0 la M=3DE9moire de Louis = Vierne by P=3D ierre=3D20 Cochereau).   All performers were well-prepared and played wonderfully; they seemed=3D20 inspired by the large organ and incredible acoustic (despite nearly=3D20 wall-to-wall carpeting the reverb is about 5 seconds). =3D20   The surprise piece to many was the Cochereau "Berceuse" as performed = by=3D20 Terence Flanagan, organist of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in NYC. = This=3D =3D20 homage to Vierne quotes the motif in Vierne's own Berceuse (24 pieces in = fre=3D e=3D20 style) and has a left-hand pattern which reminds one of the Alain = Postlude=3D20 pour l'Office de Compline. This is sumptuous music and is "A must have"! = =3D20 I've already ordered a copy from OHS.   Photos of the performers and organ are available on the NYC Chapter's=3D20 website: <A HREF=3D3D"www.nycagor.org">www.nycagor.org</A>.   The Chapter's next program is the Competition in Organ Performance, at = Churc=3D h=3D20 of the Incarnation (Episcopal), 209 Madison Avenue (35th Street), on=3D20 Saturday, March 29. The last event of the season is a Members' = Improvisatio=3D n=3D20 Recital and Dinner at The Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest, Fifth = Avenu=3D e=3D20 at 90th Street, on May 13th. For complete details, see the chapter's=3D20 website.   Steve Lawson Webmaster - NYC AGO <A HREF=3D3D"www.nycago.org">www.nycago.org</A>       =3D20         --part1_107.20d94d31.2ba84e80_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">On Monday night, March 17, four NYC Chapter = Members pe=3D rformed for Olivier Latry at St. Jean Baptiste Church. Latry offered many = in=3D sights into performance practice of the French Symphonic repertoire, and = see=3D med at home in the splendid acoustic of St. Jean Baptiste. Some of us had = ne=3D ver really thought about the Franck Pastorale having an "l'orage" section, = o=3D r that the best way to perform Tournemire was to dig in an be wild and = "brea=3D k the organ" based on Tournemire's playing style and personality?&nbsp; We = h=3D eard great anecdotes about Durufle and Tournemire, and bon mots about how = th=3D e pedal stops really speak (or don't) at Notre Dame.&nbsp; You had to be = the=3D re! <BR> <BR> The fabulous performers included Steven Laplante - St. Athanasius, = Brooklyn=3D20=3D - (Allegro from Symphonie VI by Charles-Marie Widor); Jennifer Pascual - = Cat=3D hedral of the Sacred Heart, Newark, NJ - (Choral-Improvisation sur le = "Victi=3D m=3DE6 paschali" by Charles Tournemire); Douglas Keilitz - Episcopal = Church, A=3D llentown, PA - (Pastorale by Cesar Franck); and Terence Flanagan - Fifth = Ave=3D nue Presbyterian Church - (Berceuse =3DE0 la M=3DE9moire de Louis Vierne = by Pier=3D re Cochereau).<BR> <BR> All performers were well-prepared and played wonderfully; they seemed inspir=3D ed by the large organ and incredible acoustic (despite nearly wall-to-wall = c=3D arpeting the reverb is about 5 seconds).&nbsp; <BR> <BR> The surprise piece to many was the Cochereau "Berceuse" as performed by = Tere=3D nce Flanagan, organist of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in NYC.&nbsp; = Thi=3D s homage to Vierne quotes the motif in Vierne's own Berceuse (24 pieces in = f=3D ree style) and has a left-hand pattern which reminds one of the Alain = Postlu=3D de pour l'Office de Compline.&nbsp; This is sumptuous music and is "A must = h=3D ave"!&nbsp; I've already ordered a copy from OHS.<BR> <BR> Photos of the performers and organ are available on the NYC Chapter's = websit=3D e:&nbsp; <A HREF=3D3D"www.nycagor.org">www.nycagor.org</A>.<BR> <BR> The Chapter's next program is the Competition in Organ Performance, at = Churc=3D h of the Incarnation (Episcopal), 209 Madison Avenue (35th Street), on = Satur=3D day, March 29.&nbsp; The last event of the season is a Members' = Improvisatio=3D n Recital and Dinner at The Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest, Fifth = Ave=3D nue at 90th Street, on May 13th.&nbsp; For complete details, see the = chapter=3D 's website.<BR> <BR> Steve Lawson<BR> Webmaster - NYC AGO<BR> <A HREF=3D3D"www.nycago.org">www.nycago.org</A><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D3=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_107.20d94d31.2ba84e80_boundary--  
(back) Subject: TC Lewis From: "alantaylor" <alantaylor@v21mail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 12:11:37 -0000   John is absolutely correct. Lewis was a first class builder but not better than all else.   The organ that was in Haverstock Hill is now somewhere in Australia. Any = one know where and how it sounds after it's long trip?   Alan Taylor London ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 9:20 PM Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3546 - 03/16/03     > No Colin. I disagree. Lewis was a good builder but not better than = Willis > (Father). Have you played Haverstock Hill? St Benet Fink's Tottenham? = and > others - Oxford Town Hall and so on. We had a 3 manual Lewis in St = Mary's > Parish Church at Harrow - and it was good, but not as good as the 4 = manual > Harrison in Speech Room. The 3 manual Walker in the school chapel was = not a > great instrument - but it was O.K. Have you played the Hill organ in All > Hallow's London Wall? Small 2 manual. Pure Gold. The Walker at Romsey Abbey? > There are other great builders. I have a lot of work on hand at the = moment > so I can't go into more detail or greater length ("Thank God" do I = hear?) > but I cannot allow your assertions to pass without opposition! > John > www.johnfoss.gr > > >      
(back) Subject: OHS Convention June 19-26 Registration From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 10:26:36 -0500   A web page for the 2003 OHS Convention June 19-23 in South Central Pennsylvania is now available at http://www.organsociety.org   Put the mouse on the "Conventions" link at the left, then click on "Conventions" in the drop-down menu. When the Conventions opening page = comes up, click on the picture for the Pennsylvania convention. You can also elect to peruse information and pictures from earlier OHS Conventions from this page.   Hotel registration information is complete on the website, but = registration for the convention itself is not yet online. We hope to mount that information next week.   Registration forms will be mailed in a few weeks to OHS members. They're going to the printer this week.   Advertising information for the OHS Annual Organ Handbook 2003 is also available online.   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 10:34:41 -0500   Hi Tim,   In the scenario we painted, we are not talking about the Johannus company, but about the Euro organ dealer handling Johannus product. The difference here is the Euro organ designed for them versus our own imported AGO versions. We do all the same things your dealer did for you with our normal AGO line-up. But if the US buyer wants to purchase directly from a Euro = dealer (because the price is lower) then he/she must make their own arrangements. That's only fair, since no US dealer is involved in the transaction. To avoid all those hassles, that's why we are here as US dealers. Your situation is basically the same as what we do for one of our Monarke customers and "all is well that ends well". Had you bought your Cantor directly from a Dutch dealer or perhaps from = the factory, you might have saved a little too, but you would also had to do = all the arranging, shipping, etc. yourself. A real nuisance and not worth the money saved and you would never have met Mr. Grauel.   Anyway, I'm glad you enjoy your custom instrument, I'm sure its good. Johannus can also build a custom Monarke Positive design using Schnitger voicing. These models are called "Van Eyck or Van Rhyn" and are very popular in Europe. Schnitger's are one of my favorite pipe organs sounds, had a few of those around where I grew up and played them as a youngster while taking = lessons.   Gary   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Teah" <teahzg@charter.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2003 4:25 AM Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments?     > Hmmm ... not quite so Gary. Maybe Johannus does it that way, but having > bought one of those Euro models from a different builder, your = statements > are inaccurate. I traveled 5 hours from my home to play an organ made = by > the builder ... not to Holland. The ordering process was handled via email, > telephone, registered mail, and electronic funds transfer. Quite easy = and > stress free actually. There was some discussion about a deposit prior = to > the organ being built as I recall. However, I chose to pay the invoice = in > full, which included building the organ, in-house voicing, packing, > shipping, and Customs Fees, delivery and tonal finishing. All of the > arrangements and paperwork were taken care of by the builder and the US Rep. > The organ was personally delivered to my door by the builder and US Rep, and > tonal finishing was done to my satisfaction. Taxes were dealt with when = I > filed my returns. As to the "flat pedal board" statement, I was given a > choice: flat, straight concave (BDO), or concave radiating (AGO). All I had > to do was wait patiently. > > Respectfully, > > Tim > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 8:09 PM > Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? > > > > Does anyone in the USA really want one of those European models ? > > Remember that it has the flat, short pedalboard, only internal = speakers > and > > no divisional capture systems. > > If so, it is perfectly alright for you to go and visit one of those = Euro > > dealers and purchase the instrument of your choice at the low web = prices > > posted. > > The dealer will want 50% up front on the spot, you fly back home, then = 2 > > months later he will call you that your organ is ready to be picked up and > > pay for the other 50%. You need to fly back there or pay someone else to > do > > the items below. > > > > Now YOU need to make arrangements and pay for those up front, the = thing > > needs to be crated for ocean shipping, boat arrangements, trucking > > arrangements, the USA government wants their taxes for duty, excise = and > > others before they release it to you. (Lots of forms to fill out) > > By the time you get the thing home (one month later) and add up your > overall > > cost, you could have bought the same (better) AGO version right here = at > home > > for the same US $ as now quoted by the US dealers. With all that, you > would > > still save substantially over what is available from other US made > > manufacturers. > > > > Why are US organs made for the US market not at about 1/2 price of = what a > > Euro comparable import costs in the US ? This is the original = question in > > reverse. > > Can you detect some price gouging here perhaps ? > > > > Note: The USA dealer who is importing Euro instruments has all those > > expenses to pay for as well, with the exception of flying back and = forth > of > > course. > > > > However, if there is genuine interest here in wanting to purchase the Euro > > versions of the Johannus organs, please email me privately and we will > find > > out if that is possible through the dealer network. Thanks. > > > > Gary > > > > --- > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). > Version: 6.0.463 / Virus Database: 262 - Release Date: 3/17/2003 > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Why not budget home instruments? From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 11:12:55 -0500   At 07:20 PM 3/17/2003 -0500, you wrote: >Arie said: > > There is product out there at $10,000 (USD). > > The following manufacturers have them > > Ahlborn-Galanti -model SL 250 (a nice classical sounding organ, > > which can be voiced) > > Johannus - Opus line, maybe even the whole line for under $10,000 > > Church Organ Systems (Viscount) - Models 401, 402 etc. > > Rodgers 527 ? - I don't know about this one, but probably retails > > for around $10,000 in the U.S. > >Thanks, Arie! This is very useful information and it addresses Bill's >original question. It's good to know that there are other brands out = there >besides brands "A" and "R" with good products and at budget prices. >than a lot of brand "A" and "R" that I have played and is much more >versatile. >The advances in sound technology within just the last few years is = certainly >impressive. > >Also, Arie, in response to your "BRAND NEW" American Classic Johannus for =   >sale >on churchorgantrader.com, there is also an Allen Renaissance R370 offered = for >almost half original price and a Rogers 905B, only 2 years old, including = 8 >speakers for a very low price (I don't know list on it). What does that >prove? > >Someone else also mentioned off-list that the European models on the web >sites >I supplied are "stripped down". I would question what that means. I = read >French and German very well and there are only 2 major differences that I = can >determine. The first is that the Euro versions are supplied with 30 note = BDO >pedalboard (AGO optional, though) and that they don't offer as many thumb = and >toe combination pistons as the American versions. I don't believe that = these >2 put together really justify the US prices being double the European >models. >(Besides, for home practice, do we really need that many pistons?) > >My whole point was in answer to Bill Raty's original question. Is it >possible? Yes it is. The Europeans have proven so and, detracters = aside, >there is a market there. They're not luxury models, but they meet a = need. >Can it be done here? That depends. Is there a viable market here and = who >determines the market? > >I think I'm finished with this thread. I, at least, have beat this horse =   >more >than enough. <VBG> > >Cheers, >TommyLee     Tommy,   This BRAND NEW American Classic, that is for sale, is from a dealer that cannot seem to sell it. It seems to me that if this organ is a hot item = in America, this dealer should at least be quoting dealer cost. Selling = below dealer cost, is not a way to stay in business. I think you will agree about that.   The truth is that this organ, just is not worth the price, it doesn't = sound very good. A number of people I know have heard it, and could not believe =   the disappointing sound coming from it. And this is the organ that Johannus is staking it's American fortunes on. I guess they will either improve on it, or drop it. The Johannus boss told my boss a year ago at NAMM, that it was met with overwhelming success. If that is truly so, there is no need to sell below dealer cost, an organ that is less than a year old.   In Europe, most electronic organs, end up in homes. It is true, European models, generally have the flat "Mechlin" board, very basic capture systems, no chimes, mediocre internal audio, compact consoles, all to keep =   the price down. I think that is why so many of these early European electronics, even with external speakers, just could not fill the church = or space properly. They were never designed to do so in the first place. Even now, at least in the lower price range, Johannus designs organs with internal audio, and if you want more volume just add their = poor sounding high efficiency speakers. They could probably be made to sound much better, by added a good amplifier/speaker system, that is able to reproduce adequately what comes off their mixer boards.   Besides the additional cost of shipping, import taxes, American dealers also deal differently with things like warranty, distance of delivery, installation costs, getting hydro approvals ( if needed). These items all =   add up significantly.   Arie V.        
(back) Subject: All the Stops by Craig Whitney From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 12:58:16 -0500   The new book "All the Stops" by Craig R. Whitney is now available at http://www.ohscatalog.org at the top of the opening page. The price is $22.50.   As a writer and assistant managing editor of the New York Times, as well = as an OHS member and good organist, Whitney brings a journalist's sense of public appeal to his interesting, personal, and often amusing paen to the organ and especially to the organ's major 20th century figures including Virgil Fox, E. Power Biggs, E. M. Skinner, G. Donald Harrison, Charles = Fisk, and a host of others. Much of this material has not appeared elsewhere.   Several months ago, Whitney wrote a large article for the New York Times = on the wonderful organ at Woolsey Hall, replete with color photos. The = article was a topic on these lists for a few days. Our fellow OHS member Joe Vitacco figured greatly in introducing Craig Whitney to the Woolsey organ, and I cannot help but believe Joe greatly encouraged this book. So, = thanks to Craig, and to Joe, as well as to all others who have helped Craig, in bringing this book to print.   Craig has said he wrote this book for the general public, with a great desire to bring his passion for the organ and its music to those who need = a portal of entry into the organ world. We hope it reaches a *very* wide audience of new organ enthusiasts, and renews the enthusiasm of the rest = of us!   Bill Van Pelt      
(back) Subject: Lighter and Irreverent Organ history 03 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 14:28:58 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Lighter and irreverent side of venezuelan organ history Part Three The Golden Organ (humorous insight)   In 1880 the Caracas Cathedral Chapter resolved to put Matias Fonte's "misconstruction" into retirement and build an up to date organ... how co= uld it be that terrific Cavaill=E9-Colls were erected distra et sinistra and = the Caracas Cathedral had to cope with a 1770 oldie?- Plans were made, and Fe= lix Chevreux, who was called for an opinion, saw a "Big Cheese" opportunity a= nd made a Big Gorgonzola that stinked a lot.   "What do you want a Cavaille-Coll for?", he may have asked. "Gee, you get= an awful expensive organ with a lot of case and reservoirs and almost no sto= ps- C'mmon, I'll make you a 22 stop masterwork for the same money!" Since we have a disgraced faible for quantity over quality Msr Chevreux' persuassions may have found an open ear, and some open noses too.   The contract was all written in french and the project showed terrific. W= hat may have impressed most was the statement that the new opus would sound twice as strong as the planned organ fir the brand-new Santa Teresa Basilika. Who cared about obscure technical backgrounds?- Who cared for t= he manufacturer of the necessary supplies in France?- perhaps one or two members of the Commitee; but if they had objections they were overvoted a= nd had to keep their mouth shut. "Monsieur Chevreux is a frenchman, hencefore he's a gentleman, hencefore he's a specialist who knows hat he does", the Chapter may have said. We a have a disgraceful faible to think that all what comes from abroad (specially from Europe) is the non plus ultra.   Great things went on in 1881 once the contract was signed and the first 25.000 FR paid. "Meanwhile the works on the Organ Tribune went on, the Masses were held in the Sagrary Side Chapel", says the ancient report. Mystified by a thick dust cloud Msr. Chevreux began his work. Matias Font= e's "misconstruction" disappeared although order was given to conserve it for further use; and this is what I most regret in all this history. The choi= r structure had to be reinforced and a bigger door stemmed in the wall. A l= ot of funny things happened during the construction when Monsieur Chevreux found out that he, =A1wooops!, had forgotten the pedal stops and swiftly = had to order two 16' ranks and cramp 'em in. Another "wooops" came when the Maitre found out that a reed "appel" needs its corresponding "renvoi". Bu= t what the heck- for Big Spirits little mistakes like these are peanuts, an= d shady details always can be hidden behind a sensational show. Swiftly he made a big fuss that he had added "six footsteps and two stops more than planned" to give the instrument even more "strength", and the Chapter mel= ted down at the impression that they'd got a nice Extra. And the facade- Ahh, the facade!!... Gilded and polichromated all over it gleemed and glittered on the Choir over the Main Altar. With lots of (mut= e) pipes, crowned with turbants and angels, with barroque and neogothic elements mixed together with lots of scrolled ornaments and carvings it m= ade a real terrific impression, and the chapter may have cheered. Later on, organologuists saw the pictures, raised their eyebrows, swallowed down a "YUK" and wrote that the facade was... hmm... *tr=E8s interessant*, "One = of the most original organ facades of Caracas", "unique in its style"- they were genial paraphrasing the real impression. Let's remain polite and sti= ck to it.   In 1882 the Magnum Opus could be heard for the first time, and everybody = was in high spirits. "The Organ that sounded at Sim=F3n Bolivar's birth cente= nnary to rejoy and satisfaction of all who had the privilegue to hear it" was t= he cheerisch title of an article about the Instrument. Happiness didn't endu= re however because the SuperOrgan got its first nasty failure exactly one da= y after the guarantee had expired and Msr Chevreux had left the scene. "Pipes are bent, sagged and cracked, and the whole instrument has a lot o= f sounding and mechanical faults" is written in a report Nov. 1884. A handwringing chapter called "for a skilled man who can solder the pipes a= nd work all together to new function". Yes, the "skilled man" was fund and hired; yes, the repair cost was exactly 1/10th of the purchase sum; and y= es, the organ was "worked together to new function" again... but from there o= n the Caracas Cathedral organ became a bad and costly joke. We own a "Who i= s Who in Venezuelan Organbuilding" list because all renowned and later on n= ot so renowned organ builders of the country were called and their names not= ed down in the records. None of them went into details leaving a technical report behind, however. Was the organ misinstalled? Were the reservoirs t= oo small or chronically overweighted? Was the pipework cheap stuff ? Or all that together? We'll never know.   Soon the instrument was called "Golden Organ"- it's said because of its gildened facade, but I venture to say it was because over the time the repair costs became the equivalent of its weight in gold meanwhile the Cathedral organists had to play at a Cavaille-Coll 4 stop "spinet" that w= as purchased in 1897 because the Big Brother was chronically sick.   The last organ builder who was called to the Golden Patient was my old friend Kurt Schmeltzer who came, saw, shrugged his broad shoulders and, a= s I knew him, charged a generous sum for his inspection work. "When Schmeltzer doesn't do it it's a lost case"- the Chapter may have stated, and after a couple of sleepless nights it was resolved to sell th= e pipework to a junker, make a nice BBQ with the wooden inwards and- let th= e facade in place "ad major dei gloriam" and to keep the appearance over th= e fact that the Golden Organ had been a Golden Scam.   Bad tongues say that in the 1940s it became a steady joke to take a novic= e to the Cathedral, show him the Golden Organ from the nave, and make him guess the spec. Then, the candidate was leaded to the choir to see that behind the terrific facade there was- nothing... :)- Fun was over in 1967 when the Golden Organ facade got to the landfill.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: Old Roman Catholic Hymn Search (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 10:19:09 -0800   THIS goes back a ways (grin), and it's not in any of my old Roman Catholic hymnals .. St. Gregory, St. Basil, Catholic Youth.   The Latin starts:   Adoro te, O panis caelice, O Domine, O Deus maxime.   (refrain)   Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus: Semper tibi gloria sacra sit sub hostia!   I'm looking for the ENGLISH, but all I can remember is:   We thee adore, O ... Living Bread from Heaven? Holy Angels' Bread? something something something ...   (refrain)   Holy, Holy, Holy: Thou alone art holy; Adoration without end To the Blessed Sacrament   Or SOMETHING like that ... ring a bell with anybody?   If you MUST know, Fr. Rossini has a nice setting of the Latin, but I want to do it in ENGLISH (grin).   Cheers,   Bud