PipeChat Digest #3555 - Wednesday, March 19, 2003
 
Re: Latry at St. Ignatius - March 16, 2003
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
Re: Farncis Booth (was Re: TCLewis)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Walker Info.
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Walker .... I meant Carpenter not Armstrong .... Not enough Coffee this A
  by "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com>
Re: Gregorian booklets
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Allen 2-manual available
  by "Patricia and Bill Scoffield" <grampa@eagle.ca>
Re: Father Willis - con man and crook?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Melbourne Cathedral
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Father Willis - con man and crook?
  by <Chicaleee@aol.com>
Re: Father Willis - con man and crook?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Settings of Vruechten (X-Post)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
RE: Settings of Vruechten (X-Post)
  by "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Latry at St. Ignatius - March 16, 2003 From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 13:30:22 +0100 (CET)   WOW!! What an event, and what a review! Thanks, Malcolm! I would not have thought, that it would be possible in these difficult and heart-hurting times. Thanks to Kent Tritle, thanks to Professor Latry, and, of course, thanks and hugz to you. Cheers Felix     Malcolm Wechsler schrieb: > Olivier Latry at St. Ignatius Loyola, Sunday, March 16th, > 2003 > > > > Dear Lists and Friends, > > > > While government cafeterias in Washington pride > themselves on their effete > little gesture, renaming French Fries and French Toast > "Freedom Fries" and > "Freedom Toast," which would be funny were it not so > unfunny, the good folks > of "Sacred Music in a Sacred Space" at St. Ignatius > Loyola acted like > grownups, and took part in a city-wide festival called > "Sounds French." > Details at: www.soundsfrench.com and details about music > at St. Ignatius > at: www.saintignatiusloyola.org Well, Kent Tritle, who > grows in stature > daily as a stand up comic, in his introduction said: We > will have French > Fantasies, French Finals, French Concerti, and French > Improvisation. That > was not his exact list, which I can't remember, but it > will do, and the > emphasis was always on the French! This was lost on no > one - laughter began > to take hold by the second item, and there was tumultuous > applause at the > end. > > > > Olivier Latry gave us a complete Messiaen cycle in six > concerts here some > time ago, and now he gave us the Apparition de l'Eglise > eternelle, a truly > superb beginning! With its wonderful sustained shifting > harmonies and > immense unbroken intensity, this was like an excellent > proofing of the Organ > for first time visitors to the church. I did hear a great > deal of French > being spoken, so the church would seem to have made some > new friends this > night and this week. > > > > Next, an improvisation of Tournemire, transcribed by > Maurice Durufle - > Petite rhapsodie improvisee. (Yes, I miss the > diacriticals too.) This > lovely piece was indeed petite - quite short, and it just > bubbled along > cheerfully, certainly remarkable as an improvisation. > > > > For some reason, I don't think I have ever heard the > First Fantasie of > Alain. Is it actually played a lot? It is a superb piece, > without the > serenity of the Second, except in its quiet closing > section. > > > > Deuxieme Fantasie - Alain. Talk about evocative. With > each hearing of this > complex and lyrical work, its beauties become more > clear. > > > > Closing the first half of the program, Final d'Evocation > - Marcel Dupre, > another exciting piece new to me. I recall one amazing > section, in which > the right hand is playing on the Voix Humaine with > Tremulant of the fourth > keyboard, the Petit Recit, which sounds down the nave > from a modest sized > box with shutters on three sides at the very top of the > Organ, right under > the ceiling. The left hand is burbling along rapidly, > fairly low on a clear > Flute registration. That was just part of the magic of > this piece. > > > > Intermission > > > > The second part of the concert gave me my first tastes of > music by Thierry > Escaich (b. 1965), now Organist of St-Etienne-du-mont > (the Durufle church). > Evocation 1 - Begins with a fascinating long monody, > covering a wide bit of > the keyboard range, reappearing in a second section > between sections in two > parts with a quite sparkling registrations. There follows > a louder section > building on the previous material, growing in volume. All > ends quietly with > the opening monody with interpolations of the sparkly > bits. > > > > Evocation 2 has tremendous locomotion from a repeated > pedal note, later in > octaves, continuing relentlessly. It builds and builds > with the ostinato > also played in the manuals, to a tremendously powerful > ending. > > > > Vincent Paulet (b. 1962) is a new name to me. I Googled > him and found a > small biographical site, and succumbed to intellectual > weakness and clicked > on "translate this site." Glad I did! I learned that M. > Paulet is > type-setter in residence to the Theatre de la Renaissance > d'Oullins, and > also that with Michel Merlet, he studied "running away!" > (Compositeur =3D > composer, not type-setter, in context. Running away is, > of course, Fugue!) > We heard "Elegie," which surprisingly, began rather > bouncily, but later > became suitably elegiac. > > > > Born in 1947, Jean-Louis Florentz is Professor of > Ethnomusicology at the > Conservatoire in Lyons. We heard two pieces from a set of > seven, called > Laudes, based on the Ethiopian Matins Liturgy. Chant des > fleurs is a > delicate little work, characterized by bubbly, rocking > motions in the > hands - a lovely piece. > > > > Rempart de la Croix is perhaps slightly medieval with > quiet parallel 4ths > > > > Last on the program was the Final from the First Sonata > of Jean-Pierre > Leguay, who shares the bench at Notre Dame with Olivier > Latry. This is a big > piece, beginning with a strong Pedal melody with big > reeds, possibly a > cantus firmus that I could not recognize, with great > trilly warblings in > the hands. Then, there was a rather pointillistic pecking > at quite dissonant > clusters. Later, the deep Pedal cantus-like notes became > much more > insistent, with lots of wiggling going on in the manuals. > The Pedal grew, as > did the wiggling going on in the manuals, now somewhat > loud and shrill. > Then, the keys were struck rapidly with the flats of both > hands - would we > have noticed without the projection screen in front, upon > which we could > watch the artist at the helm? > > > > After the applause died down and the standing ovationers > became seated, Kent > Tritle took to the podium again, and announced that at > Intermission, Olivier > had said he would really like to do an improvisation on a > given theme, at > the end. The audience clearly required an encore, and so > it came to pass. > The theme was timely and apt, <Da Pacem>, the Introit to > the Mass for Peace. > As Rodney mentioned in a posting shortly after the > concert, while Kent sang > the chant (most beautifully), Olivier began to punctuate > it with short, > soft, 16' Pedal notes, and later, with yet more - in > other words, as Kent > sang, the improvisation had already begun, and so it > continued in great > brilliance, all informed by the rock solid plainsong > melody. What a > magnificent evening it brought to an end! > > > > Tonight, they will be lining up early to get into another > concert with > Olivier Latry, the Choir and Orchestra of St. Ignatius > Loyola, conducted by > Kent Tritle and Aaron Smith, Andrew Henderson, Organist, > and Francoise > Pellie-Murail playing the Ondes Martenot. On Friday > evening, a solo Organ > recital by Theirry Escaich. > > > > Excitedly yours, > > > > Malcolm Wechsler > > www.mander-organs.com > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Farncis Booth (was Re: TCLewis) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 12:44:56 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Concerning Francis Booth, I know little. The history of these local Northern UK builders is, at best, patchy.   However, the Booth name crops up in several guises, one of the most remarkable being "Booth of Otley" who was reputed to be yet another disciple of the great Schulze.   The Elvin book may be the one I was thinking of, but it is a long time since I read it in the library.   Thistlethwaite writes about 19th century organs of course, but I cannot recall ever having read it.   Abbott & Smith remain something of a mystery, but there is an organ by them in Japan!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   >   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Walker Info. From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 05:46:04 -0800 (PST)   --0-840632048-1048081564=3D:20541 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii     Thanks for the info. I met Bob about 5 years ago and tried to buy a 3 = manual from him. Even back then John Armstrong was running things and Bob = was always on the road doing tonal work. So the mode of operation you = mention has been going on for a while .... I did not know the degree as = you indicated.   I said tried to buy an organ, because I gave up trying to get John = Armstrong to return my calls etc. We had gotten to the stage of spec. = design and price but from that point on, I could not get through to him to = finalize the deal. After about 6 months of this, I just gave up.   Matt       --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop! --0-840632048-1048081564=3D:20541 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <P>Thanks for the info. I met Bob about 5 years ago and tried to buy a 3 = manual from him. Even back then John Armstrong &nbsp;was running things = and Bob was always on the road doing tonal work. So the mode of operation = you mention has been going on for a while .... I did not know the degree = as you indicated.</P> <P>I said tried to buy an organ, because I gave up trying to get John = Armstrong to return my calls etc.&nbsp; We had gotten to the stage of = spec. design and price but from that point on, I could not get through to = him to finalize the deal. After about 6 months of this, I just gave = up.</P> <P>Matt</P><p><br><hr size=3D1>Do you Yahoo!?<br> <a = href=3D"http://rd.yahoo.com/platinum/evt=3D8162/*http://platinum.yahoo.com/= splash.html">Yahoo! Platinum</a> - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, <a = href=3D"http://rd.yahoo.com/platinum/evt=3D8162/*http://platinum.yahoo.com/= splash.html">live on your desktop</a>! --0-840632048-1048081564=3D:20541--  
(back) Subject: Walker .... I meant Carpenter not Armstrong .... Not enough Coffee this AM :) From: "Mattcinnj" <mattcinnj@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 05:48:42 -0800 (PST)   --0-1415920746-1048081722=3D:82732 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii       --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop! --0-1415920746-1048081722=3D:82732 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <p><br><hr size=3D1>Do you Yahoo!?<br> <a = href=3D"http://rd.yahoo.com/platinum/evt=3D8162/*http://platinum.yahoo.com/= splash.html">Yahoo! Platinum</a> - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, <a = href=3D"http://rd.yahoo.com/platinum/evt=3D8162/*http://platinum.yahoo.com/= splash.html">live on your desktop</a>! --0-1415920746-1048081722=3D:82732--  
(back) Subject: Re: Gregorian booklets From: <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 10:44:21 -0500   GIA in Chicago publishes a small booklet titled "Jubilate Deo" of about 30 = pages which contains a limited but nice cross section of chants for use = throughout the year. Last I ordered them I think the price was $1.25 each. regards Dick Siegel    
(back) Subject: Allen 2-manual available From: "Patricia and Bill Scoffield" <grampa@eagle.ca> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 12:47:05 -0500   List, St. Philip's Lutheran Church in Etobicoke (Toronto) has an Allen eclectronic for sale, as they have installed a new "hybrid" from Phoenix organs of Peterborough, Ontario, with pipes from Mead Music, Port Hope. This two-manual would be perfect for home practice. It has a card reader, and there are plenty of cards with it. It operated in its environment = with 3 sets of speakers, and I think they are all included in the package. The =   finish is very light oak.     Make: Allen digital computer type, Series 100   Model: 123C   Serial Number: AC 3029   Purchase Date: October 1975   Purchase Price: $15,465   Asking Price: best offer.     Bill Scoffield 905 797 2566      
(back) Subject: Re: Father Willis - con man and crook? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 18:51:18 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Poor John.....close to apoplexy!   The comment concerning Fr Willis is not far fetched or inaccurate.   I'm not sure if I can quote Henry Willis IV verbatem, but on the TV series "Howard Goodall's Organ Works", Henry Willis IV made the following comment......   "My Grandfather was not inhibited by the 18?? "briberies and corruption act"........the usual thing was to have two benefactors, each unkown to the other, with each paying half. The church paid the other half..... This made certain organ building quite profitable"   Fr Willis also entered into an illegal marriage and bribed the vicar of the church by providing a new organ for which they never paid.   Now....far be it from me to be judgemental....God knows, in my financial work, I mixed with many con-men and crooks....delightful people they are too. I'm sure I would have liked old Henry, but it doesn't alter the fact that he was a crook!   Sorry about that!   I'll just slope off now........   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- John Foss <harfo32@hotmail.com> wrote: > Father Willis - con man and crook! JC! Colin where > did you pick that info. > from! Chapter and verse? Documented?   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Melbourne Cathedral From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 18:59:31 +0000 (GMT)   Hi,   That's the penalty for having an American partner for some years!   I always thought that Kangaroos hopped.   Perhaps they crawl down the high street on all fours like the men.   Whooooo!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Mark Quarmby <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> wrote:   As for > kangaroos (hopping > down our main streets), Colin is beginning to sound > more like an > American every day with that kind of comment! :-) I > thought they were > the only ones to believe such myths! :-) The Poms > should know better! >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Father Willis - con man and crook? From: <Chicaleee@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 14:35:12 EST     --part1_72.2ba4750c.2baa2070_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   I found this on 7 of 457 pages of links about Henry Willis and his = organ=3D20 building. One article hinted at his notoriety. >=3D20 > >> Notable Organs amongst the thousands built by "Father" Henry = Willis=3D20 >> Aberdeen Cathedral=3D20 >> Calcutta Cathedral=3D20 >> Canterbury Cathedral=3D20 >> Carlisle Cathedral=3D20 >> Coventry Cathedral=3D20 >> Dundalk RC Cathedral=3D20 >> Durham Cathedral=3D20 >> Edinburgh Cathedral=3D20 >> Exeter Cathedral=3D20 >> Glasgow Cathedral=3D20 >> Hereford Cathedral=3D20 >> Lincoln Cathedral=3D20 >> Oxford Cathedral=3D20 >> St. David's Cathedral, Cardiff=3D20 >> St. Paul's Cathedral, London=3D20 >> Salisbury Cathedral=3D20 >> Truro Cathedral=3D20 >> Wells Cathedral=3D20 >> Winchester Cathedral=3D20 >> Windsor Castle=3D20 >> Blenheim Palace=3D20 >> Exhibition Concert Hall, Brisbane=3D20 >> Dome Pavilion, Brighton=3D20 >> Town Hall, Coatbridge=3D20 >> Town Hall, Reading=3D20 >> Town Hall, Hove=3D20 >> Town Hall, Huddersfield=3D20 >> Aberdeen Music Hall=3D20 >> St. Peter's, Blackburn=3D20 >> Royal Academy of Music, London=3D20 >> Hampstead Conservatoire, London=3D20 >> Royal Dublin Society, Dublin=3D20 >> Victoria Hall, Exeter=3D20 >> Park Hall, Cardiff=3D20 >> Westminster Chapel, London=3D20 >> St. Paul's School, London=3D20 >> St. George's Hall, Liverpool=3D20 >> Royal Albert Hall, London=3D20 >> King's College Chapel, University of London=3D20 >> Alexandra Palace=3D20 >> The Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford=3D20 >> St. Nicholas', King's Lynn=3D20 >> Giggleswick School Chapel The Origin of the Title "Father" Henry = Willis=3D20 >> The Musical Times, in their edition dated 1 May 1898, presented an = extra=3D20 >> supplement of "a Portrait of Mr. Henry Willis, specially taken for = this=3D20 >> paper by Messrs. Russell and Sons." to accompany an article about = our=3D20 >> founder.=3D20 >>=3D20 >> The final part of the article reads..."=3D20 >> >>> "FATHER" WILLIS.=3D20 >>>=3D20 >>> Two hundred years ago there lived in this country a great organ = builder=3D20 >>> whose instruments were the glory of their maker. Two of his nephews = were=3D =3D20 >>> associated with him in his business. Partly to distinguish him from = his=3D20 >>> younger relatives, but more especially as a mark of high appreciation = of=3D =3D20 >>> his great abilities and artistic worth, he was canonized (sic), so = to=3D20 >>> speak, with the title "Father". His name is familiar enough in = the=3D20 >>> history of organ building - Father Smith. Henry Willis is also = assisted=3D20 >>> by a younger generation, having two sons - Vincent and Henry - = working=3D20 >>> with him, in whom he has great confidence and hopes. It is = natural,=3D20 >>> therefore, that he, the greatest organ builder of the Victorian Era, = wil=3D l=3D20 >>> be called Father Willis."=3D20 >>>=3D20 >>>=3D20 >>=3D20 >=3D20 =3D20 Pipe organs by T.C. Lewis, and subsequently, Lewis & Co. Ltd., are a breed = o=3D f=3D20 first-class instruments which found niches in various prominent = Glasgow=3D20 venues during the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.=3DC2=3DA0 Thomas = Christoph=3D er=3D20 Lewis began his career as an apprentice architect, then in about 1860/1 = in=3D20 partnership with John Tunstall and John Whitaker, he founded a organ = buildin=3D g=3D20 business. In 1866 the firm moved into a new factory in Ferndale Road,=3D20 Brixton,=3DC2=3DA0 London. As well as organ-building, some bell-founding = was car=3D ried=3D20 out. In 1884 the firm began trading as a limited company - Lewis & Co. = Ltd.=3D =3DC2=3DA0=3D20 By about 1900 T.C. had left the firm, which continued trading as Lewis & = Co=3D20 Ltd. The same high standard continued. A merger took place in 1919 = with=3DC2=3D =3DA0=3D20 Henry Willis and Son, who moved into the Ferndale Road works, the names = bein=3D g=3D20 combined into Henry Willis & Son and Lewis & Co. Ltd. In 1925 the Lewis = name=3D =3D20 was dropped. =3D20 By Colin Jilks I confess I am as guilty as the next man, whether on the road or working = on=3D20 organs. Over the years I have been associated with some interesting = organs.=3D20 Southwark Cathedral and Reading Town Hall were two I encountered during = my=3D20 early =3DE2=3D80=3D9CWillis=3DE2=3D80=3D9D days. I have proudly told = stories of these pa=3D st glories, but=3D20 now we know Henry Willis 111 was not always pursuing the best course. = (His=3D20 driving was also renowned for being =3DE2=3D80=3D9Chairy=3DE2=3D80=3D9D; = in fact, his ca=3D r keys were=3D20 eventually confiscated).   =3D20     --part1_72.2ba4750c.2baa2070_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">I found this on 7 of 457 pages of links about = Henry Wi=3D llis and his organ building.&nbsp; One article hinted at his = notoriety.<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#400040"=3D style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"A=3D rial" LANG=3D3D"0"><B>Notable Organs amongst the thousands built by = "Father" H=3D enry Willis</B> <BR> Aberdeen Cathedral <BR> Calcutta Cathedral <BR> Canterbury Cathedral <BR> Carlisle Cathedral <BR> Coventry Cathedral <BR> Dundalk RC Cathedral <BR> Durham Cathedral <BR> Edinburgh Cathedral <BR> Exeter Cathedral <BR> Glasgow Cathedral <BR> Hereford Cathedral <BR> Lincoln Cathedral <BR> Oxford Cathedral <BR> St. David's Cathedral, Cardiff <BR> St. Paul's Cathedral, London <BR> Salisbury Cathedral <BR> Truro Cathedral <BR> Wells Cathedral <BR> Winchester Cathedral <BR> Windsor Castle <BR> Blenheim Palace <BR> Exhibition Concert Hall, Brisbane <BR> Dome Pavilion, Brighton <BR> Town Hall, Coatbridge <BR> Town Hall, Reading <BR> Town Hall, Hove <BR> Town Hall, Huddersfield <BR> Aberdeen Music Hall <BR> St. Peter's, Blackburn <BR> Royal Academy of Music, London <BR> Hampstead Conservatoire, London <BR> Royal Dublin Society, Dublin <BR> Victoria Hall, Exeter <BR> Park Hall, Cardiff <BR> Westminster Chapel, London <BR> St. Paul's School, London <BR> St. George's Hall, Liverpool <BR> Royal Albert Hall, London <BR> King's College Chapel, University of London <BR> Alexandra Palace <BR> The Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford <BR> St. Nicholas', King's Lynn <BR> Giggleswick School Chapel <B>The Origin of the Title "Father" Henry = Willis</=3D B> <BR> The Musical Times, in their edition dated 1 May 1898, presented an extra = sup=3D plement of "a Portrait of Mr. Henry Willis, specially taken for this paper = b=3D y Messrs. Russell and Sons." to accompany an article about our founder. = <BR> <BR> The final part of the article reads..." </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = styl=3D e=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Arial"=3D LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><I>"FATHER" WILLIS.</I> <BR> <BR> <I>Two hundred years ago there lived in this country a great organ builder = w=3D hose instruments were the glory of their maker. Two of his nephews were = asso=3D ciated with him in his business. Partly to distinguish him from his = younger=3D20=3D relatives, but more especially as a mark of high appreciation of his great = a=3D bilities and artistic worth, he was canonized (sic), so to speak, with the = t=3D itle "Father". His name is familiar enough in the history of organ = building=3D20=3D - Father Smith. Henry Willis is also assisted by a younger generation, = havin=3D g two sons - Vincent and Henry - working with him, in whom he has great = conf=3D idence and hopes. It is natural, therefore, that he, the greatest organ = buil=3D der of the Victorian Era, will be called Father Willis."</I> <BR> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> Pipe organs by <B>T.C. Lewis</B>, and subsequently, <B>Lewis &amp; Co. = Ltd.<=3D /B>, are a breed of first-class instruments which found niches in various pr=3D ominent Glasgow venues during the late 19th and early 20th = Centuries.=3DC2=3DA0=3D20=3D <B>Thomas Christopher Lewis </B>began his career as an apprentice = architect,=3D then in about 1860/1 in partnership with John Tunstall and John Whitaker, = h=3D e founded a organ building business. In 1866 the firm moved into a new = facto=3D ry in Ferndale Road, Brixton,=3DC2=3DA0 London. As well as organ-building, = some=3D20=3D bell-founding was carried out. In 1884 the firm began trading as a limited = c=3D ompany - Lewis &amp; Co. Ltd.=3DC2=3DA0 By about 1900 T.C. had left the = firm, wh=3D ich continued trading as Lewis &amp; Co Ltd. The same high standard = continue=3D d. A merger took place in 1919 with=3DC2=3DA0 <B>Henry Willis and Son, = </B>who<B=3D > </B>moved into the Ferndale Road works, the names being combined into = <B>H=3D enry Willis &amp; Son and Lewis &amp; Co. Ltd. </B>In 1925 the Lewis name = wa=3D s dropped.<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D3=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"> <BR> By Colin Jilks<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">I confess I am as = guilty as=3D20=3D the next man, whether on the road or working on organs. Over the years I = hav=3D e been associated with some interesting organs. Southwark Cathedral and = Read=3D ing Town Hall were two I encountered during my early = <I>=3DE2=3D80=3D9CWillis=3DE2=3D =3D80=3D9D</I> days. I have proudly told stories of these past glories, = but now=3D20=3D we know <I>Henry Willis 111</I> was not always pursuing the best course. = (Hi=3D s driving was also renowned for being =3DE2=3D80=3D9Chairy=3DE2=3D80=3D9D; = in fact, his=3D20=3D car keys were eventually confiscated).<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_72.2ba4750c.2baa2070_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Father Willis - con man and crook? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 20:04:19 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   With so many Fr Willis organs, many of which the old man probably didn't have a hand in because of the "factory" approach, I was reminded of a delightful comment made by Henry IV, when Howard Goodall asked, "How many people worked for your Grandfather?"   Henry IV replied, "Well, ALL of them rather than almost none of them today".   Delightful!   Redgards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Chicaleee@aol.com wrote: > > > > > >> Notable Organs amongst the thousands built by > "Father" Henry Willis     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Settings of Vruechten (X-Post) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 14:52:02 -0600   Hi! What are your favorite settings of the hymn "This Joyful Eastertide" I'm also interested in any subdued settings of Easter hymns. I always include the singing of a hymn in my recitals and I'm doing a recital the Sunday after Easter and would like to include the singing of a more subdued Easter hymn     Lenten Blessings, Beau Surratt, Organist St. Peter's UCC, Elmhurst,IL Organ Performance Major, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb,IL      
(back) Subject: RE: Settings of Vruechten (X-Post) From: "Stephen Barker" <steve@ststephenscanterbury.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 21:33:13 -0000   Definitely the Charles Wood harmonies. They're in the New English Hymnal at number 121 as well as in plenty of other places I'm sure!   Steve Canterbury UK     -----Original Message----- Hi! What are your favorite settings of the hymn "This Joyful Eastertide" I'm also interested in any subdued settings of Easter hymns. I always include the singing of a hymn in my recitals and I'm doing a recital the   Sunday after Easter and would like to include the singing of a more subdued Easter hymn     Lenten Blessings, Beau Surratt, Organist St. Peter's UCC, Elmhurst,IL Organ Performance Major, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb,IL       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org