PipeChat Digest #3557 - Thursday, March 20, 2003
 
Felix Hell--a success in Subiaco Arkansas/cross-posted
  by "bruce dersch" <bedersch@earthlink.net>
Re: Old established organ builders
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
What's in a name these days?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
What' in a Name
  by "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net>
RE: Latry at St. Ignatius - March 16, 2003
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil
  by "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
RE: Latry at St. Ignatius - March 16, 2003
  by "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu>
organ-builders
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: What's in a name these days?
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
BIRTHDATE FOR DAVID GERMAN
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Felix Hell--a success in Subiaco Arkansas/cross-posted From: "bruce dersch" <bedersch@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 04:21:32 -0600 (CST)   Felix came to Subiaco and wowed them for the third time. His playing = was on the highest level of communication and well thought out. Felix = adapts easily to each instrument and uses it well to the sne dhte = compoosers message. I am sure that purists would not agree with all that = he did with the registration changes or articulation with the Bach = numbers, but with this organ and the church's accoustics, it seemed so = right and the audience agreed. The Liszt BACH and Guilmant Sonata #1 = sounded better live than on his recordings and previous performances. = Felix really has grown into the material. My only quibble is not with his = performance, but with the Strickland arrangement of the Barber Adagio, = which is missing at least one of the textural parts of the String = orchestra version, and the immitational level is quickly noticeable if you = know the score. Subiaco is an Abbey with an attached boys Academy situated in the = rural farmlands of Arkansas and a considerable distance from Little Rock, = Fayetteville, and Fort Smith. The audience was over 400 people, which in = our rural pasture land is extremely large. We even had visitors come from = as far as Kansas to here this concert. Felix had a standing ovations at = intermission, at the end of the concert, and after his encore. The = students loved it and enjoyed Felix's time on the campus and his concert. I am not capable of writing an analysis or review like Malcolm (do we = detect prose enevy here?), and I wish I had the verbal ability to do this = entry justice. Let me close by saying that as always, a visit by Felix = and Hans is always a satisfying experience both musically and socially, = and we hated to see them leave. We will definitely have them back again = as schedules permit. respectfully submitted, Bruce E. Dersch   Director of Music\r\nSubiaco Academy\r\n405 North Subiaco Ave\r\nSubiaco = AR 72865\r\nbdersch@subi.org\r\n501-934-1276  
(back) Subject: Re: Old established organ builders From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 13:56:03 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I was thinking about old estabished orgn builder here in the UK.   The oldest name I can think of is that of Nicholson of Worcester, but of course, it is no longer in the hands of the family.   Willis has to be oldest, ongoing, family company, but I feel sure that someone will know a much older one.   Rushworth & Dreaper have quite a history and have done some important work in the UK.   The demise of Hill, Norman & Beard ended a very old dynasty which could be traced back to the 18th century.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- John Foss <harfo32@hotmail.com> wrote: >   Dear list, > Whilst following up a recent discussion on stop > names I discovered that the > Italian organ building firm of Mascioni was founded > in 1829 and is still > going strong. I believe it is still in the original > family hands. This must > make it one of the oldest organ building firms in > existence   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: What's in a name these days? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 14:17:07 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   Now here's food for international thought.   Being organists and such, we always seem to dwell in the past and talk about the great masters of organ building.   Each have their views of things of course, but by general concensus, there is a sort of unwritten "league table".   If we take the First Class division, we would certainly come up with a list of merit which might include the following.   America - Aeolian Skinner is probably the best known name around the globe.   Germany - Schnitger, Silbermann, Schulze etc etc   France - Cliquot, Cavaille-Coll   UK - Wm Hill, Fr Willis, T C Lewis, Harrison & Harrison etc.   .....and so the list goes on!   These are names which would be instantly recognised by any organist or organ-builder anywhere in the world.   But what of to-day?   If we were to compile a league table of "qaulity", what names would we include?   Now obviously, we must have rules of engagement in this league table, because I know what organ-builders are like when they start criticising the work of their fellows. We would end up with libel actions, unseemly cat fights and threats of violence!   So, perhaps we should allow organ builders to make their suggestions, BUT NOT ABOUT THEIR FELLOW COUNTRYMEN. In other words, Sebastian Gluck could suggest that Ahrend build piles of old sticks, but he could not say this about Rosales (just a theoretical example you understand).   So, over to the list, who would you rate as the best organ builders of the 21st century?   Please presnt your ideas by country, or we will have a mass of names and no-one would know where they were.   Should anyone wish to give their personal/professional reasons for their choices, so much the better.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 01:17:28 EST     --part1_65.ced5049.2baab6f8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   America - I would divide this into two categories: USA - Austin has possibly taken the A-S torch, but I think Fisk is = probably primo Canada - LeTourneau   Germany - Beckerath (although my experience with German builders is = limited)   France - sadly, no experience here   UK - Mander   But I must add, that, at least in the USA and Canada, there are a = significant number of small builders who are doing incredible work, which I would probably, in many cases, prefer over the "big names." Just a few leap = to mind (in no particular order): Karl Wilhelm, Casavant (although a big name, a favorite), Dobson, Pasi, Goulding and Wood, Folkes Taylor and Boody Redman Noack Fritts Nichols and Simpson   Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui in the Muttastery at Howling Acres http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502     --part1_65.ced5049.2baab6f8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>America - I would = divide=3D20=3D this into two categories: <BR>USA - &nbsp;Austin has possibly taken the A-S torch, but I think Fisk = is=3D probably primo <BR>Canada - LeTourneau <BR> <BR>Germany - Beckerath (although my experience with German builders is = limi=3D ted) <BR> <BR>France - sadly, no experience here <BR> <BR>UK - Mander <BR> <BR>But I must add, that, at least in the USA and Canada, there are a = signif=3D icant number of small builders who are doing incredible work, which I = would=3D20=3D probably, in many cases, prefer over the "big names." = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Just=3D a few leap to mind (in no particular order): <BR>Karl Wilhelm, <BR>Casavant (although a big name, a favorite), <BR>Dobson, <BR>Pasi, <BR>Goulding and Wood, <BR>Folkes <BR>Taylor and Boody <BR>Redman <BR>Noack <BR>Fritts <BR>Nichols and Simpson <BR> <BR>Bruce, with Miles, Molly and Degui &nbsp;in the Muttastery at Howling = Ac=3D res http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502 = &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_65.ced5049.2baab6f8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 10:56:15 -0500   On 3/20/03 9:17 AM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > But what of to-day?   > If we were to compile a league table of "qaulity", > what names would we include? > Colin:   I can't say a word about the UK, except that there are a couple of = excellent Manders in NYC.   As for Scandinavia, there's a super Danish firm whose name now escapes me, but you'll know it with only that clue. Astonishing casework.   In Germany, surely Klais has to be on the list.   Does Kuhn of Zurich deserve a mention? And Rieger?   Of France, I know naught. Spain and Italy, even less.   And in North America, there are several relatively young firms that have = to be considered: Taylor & Boody, Martin Ott, Fisk, Fritts, Rosales, and Brombaugh need to be nominated; those and a few others are astonishing for their quality, for how many of them there are, and for their amazing = youth. I'll let someone else speak for Canada; I'm not up to date on that, but = have heard some stunning examples by several builders. (I used to be a big Casavant fan, but am out of date on that.)   All submitted with terrible chutzpah, as I am terribly unknowledgeable. What amazes me most is that I can't help thinking that 90% of the top rank builders are (of all things!) American! Is that just plain jingoism on my part, or is there any truth to this?   Alan           > Now obviously, we must have rules of engagement in > this league table, because I know what organ-builders > are like when they start criticising the work of their > fellows. We would end up with libel actions, unseemly > cat fights and threats of violence! > > So, perhaps we should allow organ builders to make > their suggestions, BUT NOT ABOUT THEIR FELLOW > COUNTRYMEN. In other words, Sebastian Gluck could > suggest that Ahrend build piles of old sticks, but he > could not say this about Rosales (just a theoretical > example you understand). > > So, over to the list, who would you rate as the best > organ builders of the 21st century? > > Please presnt your ideas by country, or we will have a > mass of names and no-one would know where they were. > > Should anyone wish to give their personal/professional > reasons for their choices, so much the better. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Everything you'll ever need on one web page > from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts > http://uk.my.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: What' in a Name From: "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 08:01:38 -0800   Has anyone an opinion on the Zimmer organ builders of North Carolina? I recently was in Georgia and the UMC church I played at has decided to purchase a 32 rank 3-manual instrument for their new sanctuary. Being from California, am not familiar with some of the East Coast builders. Fran Meyers      
(back) Subject: RE: Latry at St. Ignatius - March 16, 2003 From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:31:52 -0500   > While government cafeterias in Washington pride > themselves on their effete > little gesture, renaming French Fries and French Toast > "Freedom Fries   I suppose they didn't stop to think what they are saying (so truly, I'm afraid) when we think of the second word as a verb.    
(back) Subject: Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil From: "John Jarvis" <jjarvis@attbi.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 08:51:03 -0800   Diane, I've had a very similar system to yours for many years. I have a binder of photocopied hymns and other appropriate funeral music. I keep = a copy of the all inclusive edition of Malotte's "Lords Prayer" in the = back of the binder - the edition that has every available version of the Malotte = in one little book - high/low/medium voice with piano/organ, piano / organ solo.   I recently attended a Dan Miller concert where he played a very peaceful improvisation of the "Navy Hymn". It was marvelously moving! It = started with soft strings and some midi sounds that made it seem very ethereal = with a soft ringing chime in the background; then he built it to a climax changing keys a time or two; ending in that same soft ethereal sound = that he started with. I think there are many hymns that would work well with = this type of registration. I am going to attempt something similar this = Sunday in my church (non-liturgical) for the offertory using the Navy Hymn. Boy, I hope no one in my congregation was at the Dan Miller concert - they'll = run me off if the get to compare my humble playing to Mr. Miller! John   * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *=20   You can always drift through the hymnbook, picking appropriate ones = and embroidering them a little. People like things they know. Got a helper? Use 2 books. You play, helper picks the next one. = You can flow right along from one to the next. If not, a few minutes of = silence while you find the next one doesn't hurt anything.   I have one hymnbook set with particular color sticky notes for = funerals and weddings just keep turning to the next one. Pink for weddings, = yellow for funerals.   "Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee." Keep praying as you play. We are only channels for the Lord's message to flow through.   Diane S.        
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 08:58:06 -0700       Alan Freed wrote:   > > All submitted with terrible chutzpah, as I am terribly unknowledgeable. > What amazes me most is that I can't help thinking that 90% of the top = rank > builders are (of all things!) American! Is that just plain jingoism on = my > part, or is there any truth to this? > > Alan >   No Alan, I don't think so. There is much truth to what you are saying. Of course there are still great builders in Europe. When I was doing the research 25+ years ago that led to our 4-85 Rieger, there were almost no North American builders I would consider. Now, if I were doing it over again, there are a number of North American Builders I would look at. = Please do not infer from this that I would like to do it over - the Rieger = continues to be a wonderful instrument and is very different from many of the = Riegers in the Eastern US.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: RE: Latry at St. Ignatius - March 16, 2003 From: "Emmons, Paul" <pemmons@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 12:05:55 -0500   Malcolm Wechsler writes:   >Well, Kent Tritle, who > grows in stature > daily as a stand up comic, in his introduction said: We > will have French > Fantasies, French Finals, French Concerti, and French > Improvisation. That > was not his exact list, which I can't remember, but it > will do, and the > emphasis was always on the French! This was lost on no > one - laughter began > to take hold by the second item, and there was tumultuous > applause at the > end.   This is a marvelous gesture. (I'm so glad that I played Alain in a little recital yesterday). Let's all play twice as much French music as before.   It reminds me of the words of the wonderful Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Burne-Jones: "The more materialistic science becomes, the more angels = shall I paint."        
(back) Subject: organ-builders From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 09:18:34 -0800   Um, with respect, SURELY Nichols & Simpson, Schoenstein, and Goulding & Wood are the stylistic and tonal successors of Aeolian-Skinner, rather than Austin, with the possible exception of the big Austin in Bethesda-By-The-Sea, West Palm Beach FL.   John Brombaugh deserves a lot more credit than he generally gets, both for his own organs, which are superb, and for being the "father" of the modern tracker revival in the U.S. ... some of the best builders of the next generation apprenticed with him.   Paul Fritts' organs have to be HEARD to be BELIEVED ... they are positively OUT OF THIS WORLD gorgeous.   There is a virtually unknown three-manual tracker in a hybrid French classic/romantic style in La Mesa Methodist (suburb of San Diego) by Walter ("Chick") Holtkamp Jr. ... unknown because most of the local organists don't know what to DO with it ... but *I* think it's one of the finest organs in the area.   Of course they don't know what to do with the Fritts-Richards at All Souls' Episcopal either, because (1) it has a flat pedal-board, (2) it doesn't have a swell-box, and (3) it doesn't have PISTONS (gasp!) (chuckle). No chimes, either (grin).   Chris Holtkamp has yet to build a "signature" instrument, though I hear good things about the one at Peabody.   Klais is the Moller of Germany (grin).   Ruffati is the Kilgen of Italy (chuckle).   Harrison of England seems to have figured out the problems of building for American churches with central HVAC ... I've heard good things about their newer US organs, but I haven't heard one in person.   Mander, of course.   Fisk and Rosales are vastly over-rated. I get to say that because I'm NOT an organ-builder (grin). Oberlin seems to be the best of the current lot, Fisk-wise.   Dobson, yes ... Our Lady of Angels is good, despite the problems with the acoustics, which weren't their fault.   I can't say that I've heard a Gluck organ in person, but Sebastian certainly thinks and writes righteous thoughts (grin).   Wicks COULD be due for a turn-around, with a new tonal director and a return to the style of the Willis-Wicks instruments. Has anybody heard that new instrument in an Episcopal church in Texas that follows the design of one of the Willis Wicks?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: What's in a name these days? From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 13:51:39 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   For Germany: Oberlinger bros. is excellent. Andres. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.   Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: (SNIP)   > So, over to the list, who would you rate as the best > organ builders of the 21st century? > > Please presnt your ideas by country, or we will have a > mass of names and no-one would know where they were.        
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 12:46:55 EST     --part1_1cc.5601941.2bab588f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Colin:   I like most of you prefer organ builders who build consistently fine organs of distinction no matter how big or small. What I mean by this is that they don't have to wet their finger and hold it aloft to see which way the wind is blowing at the moment. When the name plate goes on the console, one can reasonably know what to expect when sitting down to play one. The tonal philosophy has gelled into a universally acceptable mindset to make church music with concert music as a desireable spin off not the other way around.   I won't go into naming names, but if your mind is working you could readily come up with a couple of dozen that meet this criteria. The cream always rises to the top. The names you mentioned are only the historical tip of the iceberg. What is being produced today for the most part is back in the hands of the builders themselves, whose reputations rise or fall based upon their output, not on fads and fancies of ten or twenty or more years ago. This is healthy and very good to see happening, and that we can get back to make organ music universally acceptable again.   Ron Severin   --part1_1cc.5601941.2bab588f_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hi Colin:<BR> <BR> I like most of you prefer organ builders who build consistently fine<BR> organs of distinction no matter how big or small. What I mean by <BR> this is that they don't have to wet their finger and hold it aloft to = see<BR=3D > which way the wind is blowing at the moment. When the name plate<BR> goes on the console, one can reasonably know what to expect when<BR> sitting down to play one. The tonal philosophy has gelled into a <BR> universally acceptable mindset to make church music with concert<BR> music as a desireable spin off not the other way around. <BR> <BR> I won't go into naming names, but if your mind is working you could<BR> readily come up with a couple of dozen that meet this criteria. The<BR> cream always rises to the top. The names you mentioned are only<BR> the historical tip of the iceberg. What is being produced today for = the<BR> most part is back in the hands of the builders themselves, whose<BR> reputations rise or fall based upon their output, not on fads and<BR> fancies of ten or twenty or more years ago. This is healthy and very<BR> good to see happening, and that we can get back to make organ<BR> music universally acceptable again.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1cc.5601941.2bab588f_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 14:38:53 -0500   Sounds beautiful! Wonder if I can get this organ to do that? I've been wondering what = to play this Sunday myself.   Pistons don't work at all, but my husband will help as registrant if I ask him.   Diane S. <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< I recently attended a Dan Miller concert where he played a very peaceful improvisation of the "Navy Hymn". It was marvelously moving! It started    
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 19:27:39 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   This is proving interesting!   With just Alan Freed's reply, my suspicions about Rosales are confirmed....fine organs indeed.   I have played the Fisk at Harvard Uni.....bright, strange tuniung, but very effective.   The Dabish companie must be Marcussen, or possibly Frobenius.....both are excellent.   So already, we have the makings of a modern classic league table.   I'll throw in the UK builders who remain.......   If only for restoration work and meticulous raftsmanship, Harrison & Harrison have to be in there.   Mander are very highly regarded and, as St Iggies NY proves, quite stunning visually and musically.   Nicholson have enjoyed great success, but they have moved away from what they were doing a few years ago.   Kenneth Tickell seems to be up and coming.   There are others of course, but more later.   Keep this going and we should have an interesting cross-section of opinion across the civilised world.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Del Case <dcase@puc.edu> wrote: > >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:41:07 -0800 (PST)   List,   Which hymn tune? "Sicilian Mariners" or "Mylotta" [sic]. I'm assuming the latter.   Regards,   -Bill     --- STRAIGHT <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> wrote: > Sounds beautiful! > Wonder if I can get this organ to do that? I've been > wondering what to > play this Sunday myself. > > Pistons don't work at all, but my husband will help as > registrant if I > ask him. > > Diane S. > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > I recently attended a Dan Miller concert where he played a > very peaceful > improvisation of the "Navy Hymn". It was marvelously moving! > It started > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: BIRTHDATE FOR DAVID GERMAN From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 14:41:54 EST     --part1_20.d07dea2.2bab7382_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Does anyone have this information for upcoming recital program?   Thanks so much!   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.   --part1_20.d07dea2.2bab7382_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Does anyone have this information for upcoming = recital=3D program?<BR> <BR> Thanks so much!<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D4=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" FACE=3D3D"Monotype Corsiva" LANG=3D3D"0"><B>Scott F. = Foppiano=3D </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"></B><BR> Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#00000=3D 0" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SCRIPT" = FACE=3D3D"Mo=3D notype Corsiva" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_20.d07dea2.2bab7382_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Music suggestions for prayer vigil From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:59:00 -0800   Melita ... um, Sicilian Mariners isn't the same meter.   The original Latin text of Sicilian Mariners is a prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary, presumably sung by Sicilian sailors, who have a great devotion to her ... indeed, virtually no vessel sailing the Mediterranean and flying the flag of a Christian nation will put out to sea without a statue of the Virgin in the wheelhouse, and many of the churches in port cities are dedicated to "Stella Maris" ("Star of the Sea", one of Mary's titles).   Cheers,   Bud   Bill Raty wrote: > > List, > > Which hymn tune? "Sicilian Mariners" or "Mylotta" [sic]. I'm > assuming the latter. > > Regards, > > -Bill > > --- STRAIGHT <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> wrote: > > Sounds beautiful! > > Wonder if I can get this organ to do that? I've been > > wondering what to > > play this Sunday myself. > > > > Pistons don't work at all, but my husband will help as > > registrant if I > > ask him. > > > > Diane S. > > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > I recently attended a Dan Miller concert where he played a > > very peaceful > > improvisation of the "Navy Hymn". It was marvelously moving! > > It started > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > > related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org