PipeChat Digest #3560 - Friday, March 21, 2003
 
Another Amazing Night at St. Ignatius, NY 3/19/03
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
What's in a Name
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Needs instructions to build pipe organs
  by "Dennis Faber" <reedorgan@msn.com>
Re: What's in  a Name
  by "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3559 - 03/20/03
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: Needs instructions to build pipe organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
A Bedient replaced, and Anglican organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: What's in a name these days?
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Settings of Vruechten (X-Post)
  by "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net>
Re: Needs instructions to build pipe organs
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
 

(back) Subject: Another Amazing Night at St. Ignatius, NY 3/19/03 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 00:41:28 -0500   Dear Lists and Friends,   I have often left St. Ignatius Loyola on a post-concert high, or sometimes in a deeply contemplative mood (remembering particularly a St. Matthew Passion a few years ago), or in any number of possible moods in between those extremes. Goodness knows, I have never felt let down, not even remotely so. My second visit to this church in a few days, just last = night, left me looking for new vocabulary, and it's the blessed Carlo to the rescue. I was "gobsmacked!" Now I know what he means!   March 19th, 2003 - Dramatis Personae: Olivier Latry, Organist; Kent = Tritle, conductor; with Andrew Henderson, Organist; Aaron Smith, Conductor; = Gregory Purnhagen, Baritone; Steven W. Ryan, Piano; and Francoise Pellie-Murail, Ondes Martinot. Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, 980 Park Avenue, New York. Mander Organ, 1993, 68 Stops, 91 Ranks, Four Manuals, Mechanical Action.   The program began gently and excruciatingly beautifully, with the Durufle Messe Cum Jubilo, Opus 11. Aaron Smith conducting, Andrew Henderson = playing the sumptuous Organ accompaniment. Eight male singers, including soloist Gregory Purnhagen, a Baritone whose beautiful voice simply, and seemingly effortlessly, floats out of him and fills the vast building with luscious, lyrical sound. This all happened in the west gallery, close to the Organ, = of course, but we could watch the music being made via the very large projection TV system, and I must say that in this case particularly, being connected visually to the performance added something, a kind of look in = on a group fully in the grip of this glorious music, with a conductor whose gentle connection to the music and singers was an art form in itself. = Andrew Henderson worked his magic on what is in truth a very complex score, both = in getting the notes all played, and in registration, all of this in a way = that supports the singers, in volume, of course, but more to the point, in all the subtle rhythmic give and take of a Durufle performance. I would say = the A Team, Andrew and Aaron, really gave a very large audience a most moving beginning to a magnificent concert.   And now for something completely different: Concerto pour Orgue et = Orchestre by Thierry Escaich (b. 1965), Titulaire since 1997 at St-Etienne-du-Mont, where the Durufles played for so many years. I think the first thing that has to be said about this enormous work is that it needs to find its way into the repertoire of any symphony that is lucky enough to have a hall = with a Pipe Organ. There also needs to be a conductor who is willing and able = to absorb all the incredible complexities of this score. Kent had a holiday = in the Virgin Islands a few weeks ago, and I suspect each dip in the ocean surrounded an awful lot of score study. But then, perhaps he had done all that already, and desperately needed that holiday! Either way, he was the complete master of this work and this stunning performance from large orchestral forces, with Olivier Latry a half-mile away in the gallery.   I made a lot of notes on things that struck me from an organist's point of view during the performance, but first, let me quote a bit from Escaich's program notes: "Although one cannot really talk about 'themes' for this piece, there are easily definable 'characters' (albeit in constant transformation), divided up in the form of superimposed layers: a 'passacaglia' element in the low register of the horns recalling the Te = Deum hymn; an incantatory phrase most often in the Organ, taking its melodic contours from those of the Sanctus of the Mass for the Dead; finally, an insistent phrase with its series of repeated notes whose declension = recalls the theme of the De profundis." I shamefacedly admit to having missed both the Te Deum and the De profundis, melodies that I know well. When will my next chance to hear and absorb more of this work be?   1. Allegro moderato - The movement began with a sort of kachunk effect - a loud, short, chord on the Swell, repeated on the Great. After that, the orchestra took off on its own for a time, later with big chord punctuations from the Organ. Then the role of the organ began to build to an enormous climax. Then back down to a repeated note ostinato on the Violas, ending with one short big Organ chord, reminiscent of the beginning of the movement.   2. Adagio - This movement begins with the orchestra meandering as the Trombones grovel around and lo! Into that, the Great Mounted Cornet sounds out as a very telling solo voice. The section continues with other solo Organ voices sounding out over the orchestra. A huge exciting climax has various musical ideas batting back and forth from balcony (Organ) to = chancel (Orchestra). Then suddenly to a stunning, rather plaintive section, with some of the material aped by the Organ. Ultimately, the Organ ends it all with a shimmering high note standing alone - no orchestra.   3. Vivacissimo - This movement begins very rapidly but lyrically, and here it is clearest that the composer always writes in a clever way that = enables the Organ to always be clearly heard. It is not a question of keeping the orchestra down, but rather just writing to make sure there is space for = the Organ in the textures. The St. Ignatius Organ is not shy, proven once and for all through this great work. We heard big percussion basses and a long middle section with a brushed Cymbal ostinato. At the end, there is a long Organ solo section with kind of a babbling brook effect in one hand = against a solo line. Herewith the ending, and what an ending! Olivier came down = the two flights of stairs in record time, tearing down the long nave aisle, = and Thierry was brought up to the stage from his spot a few rows back. And = there followed: Pandemonium! Long lasting Pandemonium, with opportunities for = all to cheer mightily first the Organist, then the composer, and finally, = Kent, the conductor, who held it all together. When the orchestra was asked to stand, there was yet more Pandemonium. During intermission, there was a great, excited buzz amongst the audience members.   One has to remember that we started this evening with the great serenity = of the Durufle Mass. That seems a long way and time ago, but it remains a distant but ever so happy memory. Once we all settled into our seats = again, we were about to embark on the makings of yet another memorable event. The evening began with 8 men singing. It ended with 16 amazing sopranos, = singing mostly in unison, with a wonderfully blended and cohesive sound, at times gentle, but also able to be powerful and thrilling. Almost other-wordly it was! The orchestra in place, Steven W. Ryan took his place at the Piano, = and Francoise Pellie-Murail took hers in front of the Ondes Martenot, and we heard:   Olivier Messiaen - Trois Liturgies de la Presence Divine (1943-1944)   1. Antienne de la conversation interieure (Anthem of the Inward Conversation) The vocal part felt quite familiar to anyone knowing the Messiaen scales. I thought immediately of "O Sacrum Convivium." There is here a major part for the Piano. In the first performance, it was played = by Yvonne Loriod, who later became Messiaen's wife. As could be expected with Messiaen, there is lots of bird song in that Piano part. Google.com led me to a website that lists every single bird found here, including ones of which I have never heard! While the work is basically for unison choir, there are a few very short, amazing, and beautiful moments when the = singers break into parts.   2. Sequence du verbe, cantique divin (Sequence of the Word; Divine Hymn) This movement has within it a solo for the Ondes Martenot.   3. Psalmodie de l'ubiquite par amour (Psalmody of Ubiquity through Love) This movement has incredibly intricate and clangorous sections mixed with sections of great beauty and tenderness, with the Ondes Martenot having a great deal to do.   This was my first hearing of this work. In fact, it was my first hearing = of all the works on tonight's program. I can't think I will ever hear better performances anywhere. The Messiaen was so supercharged, people were, if not literally, at least figuratively, at the edge of their seats, at full attention. I was mesmerized by it. The applause at the end was generous, loud, and long. Steven Ryan, the pianist was given a great and = well-deserve ovation, as was Ms. Pellie-Murail, who played the Ondes Martenot. As, in turn, the choir and orchestra were recognized, they were well rewarded = with thunderous noise, but the biggest decibels went to Kent Tritle, who triumphed again in this final work, but also, has triumphed in making this great church into a wonderful musical home for many of us. As I have said before, most of the finest musical listening experiences I have ever had have been in this building.   Are you ready for Friday evening at 8? Thierry Escaich will play a solo Organ recital, ending, I am sure spectacularly, St. Ignatius Loyola's participation in the "Sounds French Festival."   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com          
(back) Subject: What's in a Name From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 23:43:24 -0600   I wouldn't disagree with Buzard either.........their operation is only 90 minutes from me, and I have toured their facilities. Alas, so far, I have not had the opportunity to hear one of their instruments live, but they = have a fine reputation.   Dennis Steckley ____________ "John-Paul Buzard, in Champaign, fills that bill. And then some.   Peter"    
(back) Subject: Needs instructions to build pipe organs From: "Dennis Faber" <reedorgan@msn.com> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 01:19:54 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0025_01C2EF47.FA7B5B60 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   I am looking for a manual or a book on how to build, add items to the =3D pipe organ. I am having a pipe organ built in my house and I want to =3D later add more ranks and stops and chimes and other items. I have never = =3D done any electric work or any kind of work like this. So any help =3D someone can give me would be great. =3D20   Thanks Dennis   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0025_01C2EF47.FA7B5B60 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type =3D content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Diso-8859-1> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY id=3D3DMailContainerBody=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-LEFT: 10px; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =3D COLOR: #000000; BORDER-TOP-STYLE: none; PADDING-TOP: 15px; FONT-STYLE: =3D normal; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana; BORDER-RIGHT-STYLE: none; =3D BORDER-LEFT-STYLE: none; TEXT-DECORATION: none; BORDER-BOTTOM-STYLE: =3D none"=3D20 leftMargin=3D3D0 topMargin=3D3D0 acc_role=3D3D"text" = CanvasTabStop=3D3D"true"=3D20 name=3D3D"Compose message area"><?xml:namespace prefix=3D3D"v" =3D /><?xml:namespace prefix=3D3D"o" /> <DIV>I am looking for a manual or a book on how to build, add items to =3D the pipe=3D20 organ.&nbsp; I am having a pipe organ built in my house and I want to =3D later add=3D20 more ranks and stops and chimes and other items.&nbsp; I have never done = =3D any=3D20 electric work or any kind of work like this.&nbsp; So any help someone =3D can give=3D20 me would be great.&nbsp; </DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Thanks</DIV> <DIV>Dennis</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0025_01C2EF47.FA7B5B60--  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a Name From: "Ray Ahrens" <Ray_Ahrens@msn.com> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 00:20:18 -0600   Dennis spoke thusly:   > Don't forget Bedient; I think his work is stunning. Francophiles especially > should hear/see/play the gorgeous instrument at St. Mark's Episcopal in > Grand Rapids. I was surprised in searching OHS catalog to find only ONE > recording of that instrument--and I don't think that one shows off its > capabilities very well. > The Grand Rapids Bedient has been relocated to U of Northern Texas in = Denton (I think that's where they are). It has been or will be replaced with something more suitable to the Episcopal service.  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 06:57:17 +0000 (GMT)   Hello,   I have a strange feeling that Bruce may be right!   Few, if any, countries seem to have quite so many highly respected "names" these days......but let's see what develops.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > There are, of course, builders of high quality > instruments all over the > world; I just think that the USA is very > fortunately to have the highest > percentage of them.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Everything you'll ever need on one web page from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts http://uk.my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3559 - 03/20/03 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 06:57:47 +0000   I am fascinated to know which piece of music calls for an hour of full organ. A little wearying on the ears, as well, perhaps?   John Jarvis said "The sounds are marvelous but an hour of full organ with several manuals coupled is about all can take at one time - too exhausting for the hands."   And yes - I have, consistently during my membership of this list, ranked Frobenius at number 1, though there are a lot of organs I haven't played!     www.johnfoss.gr         _________________________________________________________________ The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Re: Needs instructions to build pipe organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 23:05:22 -0800   There's Organ Building For Amateurs (I think that's the title), available from either OHS or the Organ Literature Foundation (I forget which), but that's strictly tracker.   I'm not sure the info you want IS all in one place for electric-action organs, at least not in how-to, do-it-yourself form.   It took me a lifetime to learn what little I know, and I still don't know MUCH (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: A Bedient replaced, and Anglican organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 23:11:40 -0800   That brings up a whole question: WHAT do Anglican churches DO with all-unenclosed neo-baroque organs?   That Flentrop in the Episcopal church in Palo Alto is nice, and the acoustics of the church are grand, BUT ...   The Anglican service REQUIRES a swell-box and an enclosed reed chorus, UNLESS you're going to restrict yourself to 17th-18th century voluntaries, Settings and anthems, of which there are not a whole lot, at least not Settings and anthems.   I will NOT buy an organ that can't at LEAST accompany "Jerusalem" and "I Was Glad" (chuckle) ... and throw in the Davies "Solemn Melody" and the Thalben-Ball "Elegy" and the Oldroyd Mass for good measure <G>.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name these days? From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 23:17:07 -0800   Colin, isn't it more a matter of small builders on the Continent who will never build outside their own country, and therefore remain unknown for the most part?   The smaller US builders don't export, for the most part ... Austin and Casavant have organs in Mexico; Phelps built that one organ in the UK; Fisk is building in Switzerland; some organs are going to Japan now; but all told that's not very many, is it?   I recall seeing pics of some spectacular CASES (at least) in Scandinavia, by builders I'd never heard of.   That's not to say we don't have some FINE builders in the US.   Cheers,   Bud       Colin Mitchell wrote: > > Hello, > > I have a strange feeling that Bruce may be right! > > Few, if any, countries seem to have quite so many > highly respected "names" these days......but let's see > what develops. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > --- Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > > There are, of course, builders of high quality > > instruments all over the > > world; I just think that the USA is very > > fortunately to have the highest > > percentage of them. > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Everything you'll ever need on one web page > from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts > http://uk.my.yahoo.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Settings of Vruechten (X-Post) From: "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 02:52:41 -0500   There's a setting by Jan Bender, in his Five Festive Preludes on Easter Hymns, Op. 78 (Concordia, 97-5495, p. 6). The first part has the melody in the tenor. The second, longer part has the melody in the pedal. It's in E-flat, lasts 3:45, and is quite festive.   Regards, Tom Jones   > What are your favorite settings of the hymn "This Joyful Eastertide"    
(back) Subject: Re: Needs instructions to build pipe organs From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 00:04:22 -0800   Hello Dennis,   A good place to start is the 2 Volume set The Art of Organ-Building by George Ashdown Audsley.   A dover Press Reprint of the original 1905 publication. It is the most complete of any of the books on organ building. It is available from Amazon.   Vern Jones, Sound Research http://www.foothill.net/~soundres   Dennis Faber wrote:   > <?xml:namespace prefix=3D"v" /><?xml:namespace prefix=3D"o" />I am = looking > for a manual or a book on how to build, add items to the pipe organ. > I am having a pipe organ built in my house and I want to later add > more ranks and stops and chimes and other items. I have never done > any electric work or any kind of work like this. So any help someone > can give me would be great. ThanksDennis