PipeChat Digest #3567 - Sunday, March 23, 2003
 
Getting pipe organs built (was: needing instructions!)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Major Builder in USA
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
British organ builders of influence
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Re: What's in a Name
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: A Bedient replaced, and Anglican organs
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Getting pipe organs built (was: needing instructions!) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 04:52:04 -0600   "Dennis Faber" <reedorgan@msn.com> wrote:   > I am have a organ company building a 5 rank organ in my house, but they = are taking their time on getting it > finished. I signed the contract in Sept of 2002 and it is still not = finished. For the organ being 5 ranks only that > should have been finished I WOULD think. The guy is an organist and = has a church, so he is employed at 2 > places.   Perhaps discussion BEFOREHAND as to delivery time would have been a good idea. Lead-times for any given builder may sometimes be longer than that, depending upon the amount of work ahead of the builder, amongst other factors.   We are currently constructing an instrument for which the contract was signed four years ago (almost to the day!) We hadn't anticipated it being THAT late, but ran into circumstances beyond our control with the major project (almost 50 ranks) ahead of it. There are valid reasons, but communications and being kept apprised as to what may be happening is a reasonable expectation.   > I think he should have employees to do the work when he is not able. Finding people who understand organbuilding, without being organbuilders themselves is next to impossible. Only recently were we able to do that, and even then, it was due to a freak set of circumstances.   Hopefully, you're talking with this person, and are able to follow the progress in person by visits to his shop, etc. If not, maybe he has something to hide and you need to be aware. There's been more than on supposedly "solid" organbuilder do a nose-dive these past few months, as the economy and now coupled with the war situation have not been particularly kind to the bottom line.   Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: Major Builder in USA From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 07:07:09 EST     --part1_1a1.122e67cb.2baefd6d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Bruce wrote: >I have heard older Wicks in Texas and Savannah,=3D20 >Georgia, that are quite rich and wonderful.=3DA0 But not as many that = were as=3D =3D20 >consistently rich and wonderful as Austin organs that I've = played.=3DA0=3DA0 I=3D20=3D don't=3D20   >know of another "big" builder that has maintained overall stability,=3D20 >fiscally, mechanically and tonally, as has Austin.   Every builder has their good and their bad installations. I've played = some=3D20 great Wicks organs and I've played some dogs. I've played some = wonderful=3D20 Mollers and I've played some that should never have left the shop. The = same=3D =3D20 goes with Austin, Schantz, et al. I recently played a recital on a 12 = year=3D20 old Wicks here in South Carolina that was one of the nicest modest-sized = 3=3D20 manual instruments that I've ever played. It had a lot of color and = richnes=3D s=3D20 and for only being 32 ranks, was a beefy sound. Bill Hamner, the new = Wicks=3D20 Tonal Director, is going to blow a lot of people's minds with what he can = do=3D ..=3D20 Scott Wick told me that they still have all the drawing and scalings = from=3D20 when Henry Vincent Willis worked at Wicks, and that they want to build = some=3D20 more instruments in that style. I think that Wicks is a builder to = be=3D20 closely watched. Now that Mrs. Barbara Wick is in charge, assisted by = her=3D20 two sons, they will be making some major strides that Martin Wick didn't = wan=3D t=3D20 to make. Their financial stability can't be touched (many, many millions of dollars = i=3D n=3D20 liquid cash), they run three different companies (airplanes, organs, = sutom=3D20 furniture) out of their facilites, and have over 70 employees working = for=3D20 them.   As to Austin, I've played some fantastic older instruments, but I = haven't=3D20 been bowled over with their newer work. There are two Austins from the = mid=3D20 to late 1980's in my town, and while one is alright, the other one is = coarse=3D =3D20 and harsh and grates on my ears every time I have to play it. =3D20   Like I said before....every builder has some masterpieces and some dogs. = A=3D20 builder can't be judged on just one or two instruments.   Monty Bennett   --part1_1a1.122e67cb.2baefd6d_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Bruce wrote:<BR> &gt;I have heard older Wicks in Texas and Savannah, <BR> &gt;Georgia, that are quite rich and wonderful.=3DA0 But not as many that = were=3D as <BR> &gt;consistently rich and wonderful as Austin organs that I've = played.=3DA0=3D =3DA0 I don't <BR> &gt;know of another "big" builder that has maintained overall stability, = <BR=3D > &gt;fiscally, mechanically and tonally, as has Austin.<BR> <BR> Every builder has their good and their bad installations.&nbsp; I've = played=3D20=3D some great Wicks organs and I've played some dogs.&nbsp; I've played some = wo=3D nderful Mollers and I've played some that should never have left the = shop.&n=3D bsp; The same goes with Austin, Schantz, et al.&nbsp; I recently played a = re=3D cital on a 12 year old Wicks here in South Carolina that was one of the = nice=3D st modest-sized 3 manual instruments that I've ever played.&nbsp; It had a = l=3D ot of color and richness and for only being 32 ranks, was a beefy = sound.&nbs=3D p; Bill Hamner, the new Wicks Tonal Director, is going to blow a lot of = peop=3D le's minds with what he can do.&nbsp; Scott Wick told me that they still = hav=3D e all the drawing and scalings from when Henry Vincent Willis worked at = Wick=3D s, and that they want to build some more instruments in that style.&nbsp; = I=3D20=3D think that Wicks is a builder to be closely watched.&nbsp; Now that Mrs. = Bar=3D bara Wick is in charge, assisted by her two sons, they will be making some = m=3D ajor strides that Martin Wick didn't want to make.<BR> Their financial stability can't be touched (many, many millions of dollars = i=3D n liquid cash), they run three different companies (airplanes, organs, = sutom=3D furniture) out of their facilites, and have over 70 employees working for = t=3D hem.<BR> <BR> As to Austin, I've played some fantastic older instruments, but I haven't = be=3D en bowled over with their newer work.&nbsp; There are two Austins from the = m=3D id to late 1980's in my town, and while one is alright, the other one is = coa=3D rse and harsh and grates on my ears every time I have to play it.&nbsp; = <BR> <BR> Like I said before....every builder has some masterpieces and some = dogs.&nbs=3D p; A builder can't be judged on just one or two instruments.<BR> <BR> Monty Bennett<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_1a1.122e67cb.2baefd6d_boundary--  
(back) Subject: British organ builders of influence From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:07:41 +0000     Good heavens Colin - why should I be annoyed with you! Life is too short = to let anger rule our lives. I was a little surprised at your comment on = Father Willis. Not being a Sun reader, it was the first time I had heard the = story, though I admit pipechat has more latitude in the "William Hickey" mode. It =   merely emphasises the fact that few organ builders make much money. When I =   was at the career contemplation age (17) I visited Jimmy Taylor at Compton's, who advised me against organ building - no money, he said. = sadly, the quality of their work declined from the end of the 50's - and when = they closed Johnny Degens and Ted Rippin started on their own. This was to = become Grant, Degens and Bradbeer, though they too have gone the way of all = flesh. Next week is the anniversary of the Greek Revolution of 1821, and I have been asked to write an article in Greek on Lord Byron for "Makedonia" a Greek newspaper. Byron is respected, quite rightly, as a hero. Every town has a street named in his honour, and Missolonghi and Ioannina have large parks with magnificent statues dedicated to him. His support for Greece = and influence on European thought was one of the main reasons the Turks realised, after their resounding defeat at the Battle of Navarino, that = they could not win. I have just finished Fiona MacCarthy's biography, based on his correspondence kept by his publisher with them and his friends. This = is the genuine article. I do not believe his tempestuous love life detracts = in any way from his greatness, and were I to describe to it Greek readers in detail I would be doing him no service. Quite apart from anything else, = they wouldn't believe it. Try telling a Greek Class that Alexander the Great, = who was born just down the road from where I live and was arguably one of the greatest military commanders of all time, was gay and his father, Philip = II of Macedonia, who united Greece, had a preference for young girls - Alexander's mother was 12 at the time of her marriage. "Nonsense!" is = their reply. OK, the evidence suggests this is the case, but so what. They = believe what they want to believe. Likewise, I do not believe that "Father" Willis's personal idiosyncracies detract from his greatness as an organ builder, though I don't doubt your story! I don't think so many Cathedrals =   would have commissioned him if his financial reputation was unstable. I = have played a few "original" Fr Willis organs, and I have not come across a bad =   one. These include the ones I mentioned - St Benet Fink, Tottenham, Haverstock Hill, Union Chapel Islington, Oxford Town Hall, and a = beautiful small organ in a strange church in Hackney - with the most wonderful = animal gargoyles on the outside - which was, at one time, the "Cathedral" the Old =   Catholic Church, and many others. OK. You may have had an unfortunate experience. There are other first rate organ builders who have had an off day. On the subject of the history of British organs, whilst I do not dispute your arguments about the minimalist approach to pedals, there are a great many excellent builders of the 18th and 19th century who pre-date Willis. Whilst not disputing the influence of Snetzler, to dismiss Dallam, Harris, =   Bridge, Jordan, Bishop and so on out of hand seems somewhat perverse. The repertoire was quite different to that of the North European school. There =   were many fine composers - Purcell, Greene, etc. but their music was quite =   different in style to that of Buxtehude, Bruhns and Bach. Whether this was =   dictated by the instruments at their disposal, or the other way round is = an interesting point for discussion. Probably it was a mixture of both. We = also had to put up with that vandal, Cromwell, whose men converted organ pipes into beer mugs around 1650, so this Puritan approach may have had a = negative effect on British organ building. Had we not had this blip in our musical heritage who knows what might have come to pass. To compare two 19th = century British Builders, Walker and Willis, for example, Walker's organ in Romsey Abbey had a pedal department in 1858, and St Thomas, Lymington had Open Pedal Pipes in 1831. By 1850 Willis had built 19 organs, Walker 100, and pushing it forward to 1870 Walker had clocked up 414, Willis 181. Schulze was a fine builder - I have played at Doncaster, though when I gave a recital there some years ago it had become a 5 manual Walker organ. The original Schulze pipework was still there. But he did not build many = organs, so his influence was limited. The predominant feature of English organs of =   the period is their sweetness of tone, but they have a distinctly = "English" character, and it is a strong one. Go to St Anne's, Limehouse, and hear = for yourself. St Giles Camberwell also has a distinctly English flavour. The action is heavier than Limehouse, but it is rewarding to play. If you want =   to look at some specifications relevant to this topic try:   Dallam 1515 Bristol Cathedral http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DN03798=     Harris 1685 Ely Cathedral http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DN03009=     Jordan 1711 St Edmund's Lombard Street, City of London http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DN17764=     Bridge 1744 St Anne's, Limehouse http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DN16712=     J W Walker Floruit 1827 - 1950+ Romsey Abbey J W Walker 1858 http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DN11434=     Henry Willis Floruit 1878 - 1950 St Benet Fink, Tottenham http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DN16939=   Church of the Good Shepherd, Clapton, London E9 http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Npocgi.exe?Rsearch?rec_index=3DD03591=     This list is, of course, merely representative, not inclusive. There were many other fine builders. John Foss www.johnfoss.gr         _________________________________________________________________ The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a Name From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 07:20:27 EST     --part1_14a.1d5eb35a.2baf008b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Bruce wrote: >I am still of the opinion that at the hands of a sensitive and = capable=3D20 >musician ANY pipe organ can play a service appropriate to any=3D20 denomination.=3DA0=3DA0=3D20   Appropriate, yes, but that doesn't mean that it will be musically=3D20 interesting. I've played Episcopal services on a 3 rank Reuter before. = Was=3D =3D20 it appropriate? I guess so. Was it interesting. Not at all. When you = onl=3D y=3D20 have a Principal, a Flute and a String, there's not a lot of variety that = yo=3D u=3D20 can have. Good thing the congregation was small and I didn't need a lot = of=3D20 power to lead the singing, because there was no power. I substituted for = a=3D20 Presbyterian church a few times before they replaced their 15 year = old=3D20 tracker organ. A good portion of the organ didn't work, due to = shoddy=3D20 workmanship on the part of the builder. Sliders weren't aligned properly, = s=3D o=3D20 not all the pipes in a rank would speak. Trackers weren't all = adjusted=3D20 evenly, so some notes played if you barely brushed a key and other = didn't=3D20 play unless the key was pushed just a little bit past the bottom of = the=3D20 keybed. Basically to play the organ, most every stop had to be on at = all=3D20 times so that something spoke when a key was pressed. Couple that with = the=3D20 fact that the new pipework was collapsing on itself, there were = mismatched=3D20 ranks of used stuff, and the only pedal stop was a almost inaudible = 16'=3D20 Lieblich Gedeckt. That church had a pipe organ, so I guess it was=3D20 appropriate, but it wasn't interesting and it certainly wasn't musical. = It=3D20 made a noise unto the Lord--and definitely not a joyful one. It was = more=3D20 like a wheezy noise. I did my best with it and the congregation was pleased. They have = sense=3D20 replaced it and I played the dedication on the replacement digital=3D20 instrument. Their new organ is much more pleasing to the ear and it's = far=3D20 easier to make music on it. I think any sensitive and imaginative artist = ca=3D n=3D20 make music on anything--even a pitiful excuse for a pipe organ--but = that=3D20 doesn't mean that it's musical. Appropriate and musical and pleasant = don't=3D20 always go hand in hand.   Monty Bennett   --part1_14a.1d5eb35a.2baf008b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Bruce wrote:<BR> &gt;I am still of the opinion that at the hands of a sensitive and capable = <=3D BR> &gt;musician ANY pipe organ can play a service appropriate to any = denominati=3D on.=3DA0=3DA0 <BR> <BR> Appropriate, yes, but that doesn't mean that it will be musically = interestin=3D g.&nbsp; I've played Episcopal services on a 3 rank Reuter before.&nbsp; = Was=3D it appropriate?&nbsp; I guess so.&nbsp; Was it interesting.&nbsp; Not at = al=3D l.&nbsp; When you only have a Principal, a Flute and a String, there's not = a=3D lot of variety that you can have.&nbsp; Good thing the congregation was = sma=3D ll and I didn't need a lot of power to lead the singing, because there was = n=3D o power.&nbsp; I substituted for a Presbyterian church a few times before = th=3D ey replaced their 15 year old tracker organ.&nbsp; A good portion of the = org=3D an didn't work, due to shoddy workmanship on the part of the = builder.&nbsp;=3D20=3D Sliders weren't aligned properly, so not all the pipes in a rank would = speak=3D ..&nbsp; Trackers weren't all adjusted evenly, so some notes played if you = ba=3D rely brushed a key and other didn't play unless the key was pushed just a = li=3D ttle bit past the bottom of the keybed.&nbsp; Basically to play the organ, = m=3D ost every stop had to be on at all times so that something spoke when a = key=3D20=3D was pressed.&nbsp; Couple that with the fact that the new pipework was = colla=3D psing on itself, there were mismatched ranks of used stuff, and the only = ped=3D al stop was a almost inaudible 16' Lieblich Gedeckt.&nbsp; That church had a=3D pipe organ, so I guess it was appropriate, but it wasn't interesting and = it=3D certainly wasn't musical.&nbsp; It made a noise unto the Lord--and = definite=3D ly not a joyful one.&nbsp; It was more like a wheezy noise.<BR> I did my best with it and the congregation was pleased.&nbsp; They have = sens=3D e replaced it and I played the dedication on the replacement digital = instrum=3D ent.&nbsp; Their new organ is much more pleasing to the ear and it's far = eas=3D ier to make music on it.&nbsp; I think any sensitive and imaginative = artist=3D20=3D can make music on anything--even a pitiful excuse for a pipe organ--but = that=3D doesn't mean that it's musical.&nbsp; Appropriate and musical and = pleasant=3D20=3D don't always go hand in hand.<BR> <BR> Monty Bennett</FONT></HTML>   --part1_14a.1d5eb35a.2baf008b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: A Bedient replaced, and Anglican organs From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 07:48:27 EST     --part1_c.cfa5255.2baf071b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   > The Anglican service REQUIRES a swell-box and an enclosed reed chorus, > UNLESS you're going to restrict yourself to 17th-18th century > voluntaries, Settings and anthems, of which there are not a whole lot, > at least not Settings and anthems   Amen, Bud! This goes far beyond just Anglicans....the only churches I = can=3D20 think of that don't need swell boxes and anything lush are German = Lutheran=3D20 churches that don't do anything but Baroque music. I played for a = Lutheran=3D20 church when I was in High School. We did everything from English = Cathedral=3D20 anthems to Gaither gospel music. They had a Rodgers and it was put = through=3D20 it's paces in a service. I even was known to use the "Flutes Trem = Full"=3D20 piston on occasion, as well as the 16' and 4' couplers.   >Again, I disagree with the service requiring a swell box.=3DA0 If the = organ i=3D s=3D20 >sensitively voiced with stops of varying dynamic, swell shades are a=3D20 luxury.=3DA0=3D20 I've got to disagree here, Bruce. For a good percentage of American=3D20 conrgegations, there is a variety of music performed. The organ needs to = be=3D =3D20 able to do a half-way decent job of accompanying a soloist or choir. I = woul=3D d=3D20 much rather have swell shades and (I can't believe that I'm going to = say=3D20 this!) sacrifice the Celeste. How can a person adequately accompany = Miss=3D20 Suzie Jean's Lenten medley of "I Walked Today Where Jesus Walked" and = "The=3D20 Old Rugged Cross" by only adding and subtracting unenclosed stops by = hand,=3D20 since there are no pistons? Most American churches aren't singing = cathedral=3D =3D20 anthems or playing the masterworks of organ literature. They are leading = th=3D e=3D20 congregational singing and providing accompaniment to choirs of 8 or = 10=3D20 singers and a warbling soloist. Even the small stock model pipe organs = of=3D20 the 1800's and early 1900's had swell boxes. They didn't always have = a=3D20 celeste, but there were ways to control dynamics. I've played a lot of = old=3D20 Johnsons, Hooks, Esteys, etc., and even on the small 6 and 7 rank = stock=3D20 models, there were swell shades.   >Granted, the full fiery swell is=3DA0 wonderful sound, but it's not = necessary=3D to=3D20 good=3D20 >Anglical service playing (especially in a 'typical' parish), and neither = is=3D =3D20 a=3D20 >chamade!   Yes, it's a luxury that we all want, and it's not necessary, but what's = wron=3D g=3D20 with wanting to have some variety? Who wants to always hear soft = stuff=3D20 played on a chiffy 8' stopped flute that sounds like a xylophone with = some=3D20 air hissing away? It's nice once in a while to have a softly purring=3D20 Dulciana for a soft passage, even without a Celeste. Full Swell--that's = a=3D20 great sound when some thick swell shades are closed on some big, smooth = reed=3D s=3D20 blazing away. I think it was Richard Purvis who called the sound = "caged=3D20 rage." It's a hair-rasing effect, but an unenclosed Positive or = Brustwerk=3D20 doesn't give the same effect. And it's definitely not the right effect = for=3D20 Victorian anthems or the organ music of the Romantic period. I really = don't=3D =3D20 know too many pieces from "The Organists Companion" that lend themselves = to=3D20 fully unenclosed instruments, either. When a registration calls for = a=3D20 Melodia, but all that's available is a Nason Gedeckt, I don't think it's = the=3D =3D20 effect that Lani Smith or Ellen Jane Lorenz was imagining. Nor is the = effec=3D t=3D20 of adding a 4' stop for the crescendo, in lieu of opening the swell shades = a=3D =3D20 crack.   I've played the Flentrop organ at All Saints, Palo Alto, since I grew = up=3D20 about 10 minutes from that church. I've also played a handful of recitals = o=3D n=3D20 the sister Flentrop at the University of California, Santa Barbara, while = I=3D20 was in college. They both have a swell pedal that moves these little = slidin=3D g=3D20 panels that are about 1/4" thick. I guess they are supposed to be = swell=3D20 shades, but all they do is knock down the upper harmonics just a little. =3D20 Definitely not how French, English, or North Americans envision swell = shades=3D ..=3D20 The lack of flexibility to perform anything other than Baroque literature = i=3D s=3D20 why we gave all the big student recitals at First Presbyterian Church, = Santa=3D =3D20 Barbara, where there was a Phelps Casavant of 4 manuals. While it was = not=3D20 the warmest sound, there were at least swell shades that did what they = were=3D20 supposed to, as well as having a couple of celestes.=3D20   Give me a limited stoplist with swell shades over an completely = unenclosed=3D20 organ anyday of the week! I would rather work hard to come up with = some=3D20 creative registrations to compensate for the lack of stops rather than = have=3D20 the stops at my disposal and not be able to have any dynamic control = over=3D20 them.   Monty Bennett     --part1_c.cfa5255.2baf071b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">&gt; The Anglican service REQUIRES a swell-box = and an=3D20=3D enclosed reed chorus,<BR> &gt; UNLESS you're going to restrict yourself to 17th-18th century<BR> &gt; voluntaries, Settings and anthems, of which there are not a whole = lot,<=3D BR> &gt; at least not Settings and anthems<BR> <BR> Amen, Bud!&nbsp; This goes far beyond just Anglicans....the only churches = I=3D20=3D can think of that don't need swell boxes and anything lush are German = Luther=3D an churches that don't do anything but Baroque music.&nbsp; I played for a = L=3D utheran church when I was in High School.&nbsp; We did everything from = Engli=3D sh Cathedral anthems to Gaither gospel music.&nbsp; They had a Rodgers and = i=3D t was put through it's paces in a service.&nbsp; I even was known to use = the=3D "Flutes Trem Full" piston on occasion, as well as the 16' and 4' = couplers.<=3D BR> <BR> &gt;Again, I disagree with the service requiring a swell box.=3DA0 If the = orga=3D n is <BR> &gt;sensitively voiced with stops of varying dynamic, swell shades are a = lux=3D ury.=3DA0 <BR> I've got to disagree here, Bruce.&nbsp; For a good percentage of American = co=3D nrgegations, there is a variety of music performed.&nbsp; The organ needs = to=3D be able to do a half-way decent job of accompanying a soloist or = choir.&nbs=3D p; I would much rather have swell shades and (I can't believe that I'm = going=3D to say this!) sacrifice the Celeste.&nbsp; How can a person adequately = acco=3D mpany Miss Suzie Jean's Lenten medley of "I Walked Today Where Jesus = Walked"=3D and "The Old Rugged Cross" by only adding and subtracting unenclosed = stops=3D20=3D by hand, since there are no pistons?&nbsp; Most American churches aren't = sin=3D ging cathedral anthems or playing the masterworks of organ = literature.&nbsp;=3D They are leading the congregational singing and providing accompaniment = to=3D20=3D choirs of 8 or 10 singers and a warbling soloist.&nbsp; Even the small = stock=3D model pipe organs of the 1800's and early 1900's had swell boxes.&nbsp; = The=3D y didn't always have a celeste, but there were ways to control = dynamics.&nbs=3D p; I've played a lot of old Johnsons, Hooks, Esteys, etc., and even on the = s=3D mall 6 and 7 rank stock models, there were swell shades.<BR> <BR> &gt;Granted, the full fiery swell is=3DA0 wonderful sound, but it's not = necess=3D ary to good <BR> &gt;Anglical service playing (especially in a 'typical' parish), and = neither=3D is a <BR> &gt;chamade!<BR> <BR> Yes, it's a luxury that we all want, and it's not necessary, but what's = wron=3D g with wanting to have some variety?&nbsp; Who wants to always hear soft = stu=3D ff played on a chiffy 8' stopped flute that sounds like a xylophone with = som=3D e air hissing away?&nbsp; It's nice once in a while to have a softly = purring=3D Dulciana for a soft passage, even without a Celeste.&nbsp; Full = Swell--that=3D 's a great sound when some thick swell shades are closed on some big, = smooth=3D reeds blazing away.&nbsp; I think it was Richard Purvis who called the = soun=3D d "caged rage."&nbsp; It's a hair-rasing effect, but an unenclosed Positive=3D20=3D or Brustwerk doesn't give the same effect.&nbsp; And it's definitely not = the=3D right effect for Victorian anthems or the organ music of the Romantic = perio=3D d.&nbsp; I really don't know too many pieces from "The Organists = Companion"=3D20=3D that lend themselves to fully unenclosed instruments, either.&nbsp; When a = r=3D egistration calls for a Melodia, but all that's available is a Nason = Gedeckt=3D , I don't think it's the effect that Lani Smith or Ellen Jane Lorenz was = ima=3D gining.&nbsp; Nor is the effect of adding a 4' stop for the crescendo, in = li=3D eu of opening the swell shades a crack.<BR> <BR> I've played the Flentrop organ at All Saints, Palo Alto, since I grew up = abo=3D ut 10 minutes from that church.&nbsp; I've also played a handful of = recitals=3D on the sister Flentrop at the University of California, Santa Barbara, = whil=3D e I was in college.&nbsp; They both have a swell pedal that moves these = litt=3D le sliding panels that are about 1/4" thick.&nbsp; I guess they are = supposed=3D to be swell shades, but all they do is knock down the upper harmonics = just=3D20=3D a little.&nbsp; Definitely not how French, English, or North Americans = envis=3D ion swell shades.&nbsp; The lack of flexibility to perform anything other = th=3D an Baroque literature is why we gave all the big student recitals at First = P=3D resbyterian Church, Santa Barbara, where there was a Phelps Casavant of 4 = ma=3D nuals.&nbsp; While it was not the warmest sound, there were at least swell = s=3D hades that did what they were supposed to, as well as having a couple of = cel=3D estes. <BR> <BR> Give me a limited stoplist with swell shades over an completely unenclosed = o=3D rgan anyday of the week! I would rather work hard to come up with some = creat=3D ive registrations to compensate for the lack of stops rather than have the = s=3D tops at my disposal and not be able to have any dynamic control over = them.<B=3D R> <BR> Monty Bennett<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_c.cfa5255.2baf071b_boundary--