PipeChat Digest #3569 - Sunday, March 23, 2003
 
Re: What's in a Name
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: defunct builders
  by "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com>
Re: What's in a Name
  by "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com>
Trying to find message
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Bruce's Comments
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What's in a Name
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: What's in a Name
  by "Mura Kievman" <mura@speakeasy.org>
Re: defunct builders
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: What's in a Name From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 15:30:57 -0600   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > > It has always amazed me that people who don't like tracker organs > always seem to play one that is in deplorable condition. Very > likely a few hours of adjustment could have had the organ above > playing fairly well. > It doesn't even always have to be in deplorable condition. There was a church in Pennsylvania that had a recently restored Victorian tracker in impeccable condition, one manual and no pedals, so there were no couplers to make the action heavy. The church also had an aged two manual and pedal Baldwin which barely still functioned. One of their organists preferred the electronic to the tracker because, he said, the action of the tracker was too heavy. This I found rather puzzling as I measured the keytouch of both instruments and found that the touch of the tracker was 20 grams lighter than the electronic.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: defunct builders From: "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 18:19:30 -0500   OK--here goes a response to one of the hundreds of wonderful = posts--Believe it or not, this list has improved my speed reading capibility to NO END.   As to the Quality of Estey Pipes--my residence organ is a pretty much = intact (except for case and the bottom Great Open Diapason pipes) T-P! I find my = 7 rank organ really perfect for the basement room because of Estey's = practice of using Haskell basses--nice and compact for the 7 foot ceiling. The = organ is a stock 1913 vintage of SW stopped flute, salicional, Harmonic Flute 4, GT Dulciana, Melodia, Open Diapason and PED 16 Bourdon. Couplers are all = TP 16-8-4 stuff. Really a lot of smooth, clear sounds of very well built pipes. And they Say "ESTEY sure knew how to build a GREAT organ bench!"   Sadly, the TP (which doesn't mean toilet paper but it should) action only works beautifully when the humidity is EXACT. Too damp in the summer and = it is sluggish, too dry in the winter and it shuts down. Aside from prudent use of the humidifier and dehumidifier, what suggestions are there?   My good ol' friend Earl Miller suggested just running the thing through a planer (I think removing the pipes first) but what do youse guys think?   Phil   ---------- >From: Gary Black <gblack@ocslink.com> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: defunct builders >Date: Sat, Mar 22, 2003, 12:40 PM >   > HI list, I would like some opinions, and reason to support them, about > defunct organ builders like: Estey, Hinners and Henry Pilcher's sons. = I > have most of my residence organ pipework from an 1905 Estey, an oboe = from a > 1923 Hinners and have access to a Henry Pilcher's Sons organ of 1922. = Just > curious as to what you think of them as far as quailty, reliabilty etc. = All > of these organs in a former life were of T-P design. Thanks, Gary > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a Name From: "D. Keith Morgan" <aeolian_skinner@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 16:00:06 -0800 (PST)   Sometimes the keydepth is a little deeper on some organs and pianos, and that will create the impression of heaviness. I have corrected many "heavy actions" simply by setting the keydepth a little more shallow. The Baldwin keydepth was probably too shallow.   DKM     --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote: > Cremona502@cs.com wrote: > > > > > It has always amazed me that people who don't like > tracker organs > > always seem to play one that is in deplorable > condition. Very > > likely a few hours of adjustment could have had > the organ above > > playing fairly well. > > > It doesn't even always have to be in deplorable > condition. There was a > church in Pennsylvania that had a recently restored > Victorian tracker in > impeccable condition, one manual and no pedals, so > there were no > couplers to make the action heavy. The church also > had an aged two > manual and pedal Baldwin which barely still > functioned. One of their > organists preferred the electronic to the tracker > because, he said, the > action of the tracker was too heavy. This I found > rather puzzling as I > measured the keytouch of both instruments and found > that the touch of > the tracker was 20 grams lighter than the > electronic. > > John Speller > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop! http://platinum.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Trying to find message From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 19:57:54 EST     --part1_149.d5a7981.2bafb212_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Posters,   Many of you probably remember two or three rather long postings by me back = in September about my escapade to bring home the Austin pipe organ. For some =   reason, I did not save copies of those messages on my computer. I have e-mailed Dave Scribner about the September archives, but I don't want to bother him if he's busy with his day job.   I was wondering if any of you happen to save all the postings from this = site. If anyone does, I would greatly appreciate it if I could get a copy of my =   postings from early September in which I told about my pipe organ.   Thanks, Keith Zimmerman   --part1_149.d5a7981.2bafb212_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Posters,<BR> <BR> Many of you probably remember two or three rather long postings by me back = i=3D n September about my escapade to bring home the Austin pipe organ.&nbsp; = For=3D some reason, I did not save copies of those messages on my = computer.&nbsp;=3D20=3D I have e-mailed Dave Scribner about the September archives, but I don't = want=3D to bother him if he's busy with his day job.<BR> <BR> I was wondering if any of you happen to save all the postings from this = site=3D ..&nbsp; If anyone does, I would greatly appreciate it if I could get a = copy=3D20=3D of my postings from early September in which I told about my pipe = organ.<BR> <BR> Thanks,<BR> Keith Zimmerman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_149.d5a7981.2bafb212_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce's Comments From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:16:27 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3131295387_31654833 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit   On 3/23/03 3:50 PM, "Cremona502@cs.com" <Cremona502@cs.com> wrote:   > One Sunday, after causing the service to run over twenty minutes with = his > sermon, the minister said, "Because of the length of the service we are = going > to sing only the first and last stanzas of the hymn." An elderly = man, but > not a wealthy or mover-and-shaker member, stood and said,"If you are in = a > hurry to leave, go ahead! I came here to worship God and I want to = sing all > five stanzas of this hymn as part of that worship." Several other = people > added "Amen" to the statement and the choirdirector signaled me to play = the > whole thing. The minister did go to the front door during the second = stanza > (and did not sing), but did not leave. > Your silence is assumed assent!   I LOVE it! Terrifico!!!   May his tribe prosper and multiply throughout the Church.   Alan   --B_3131295387_31654833 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Bruce's Comments</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman">On 3/23/03 3:50 PM, = &quot;Cremona502@cs.com&qu=3D ot; &lt;Cremona502@cs.com&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">One Sunday, after causing the = service=3D to run over twenty minutes with his sermon, the minister said, = &quot;Becaus=3D e of the length of the service we are going to sing only the first and = last =3D stanzas of the hymn.&quot; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;An elderly man, but not = a=3D wealthy or mover-and-shaker member, stood and said,&quot;If you are in a = hu=3D rry to leave, go ahead! &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I came here to worship God and I = w=3D ant to sing all five stanzas of this hymn as part of that worship.&quot; = &nb=3D sp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Several other people added &quot;Amen&quot; to the = statement =3D and the choirdirector signaled me to play the whole thing. &nbsp;&nbsp;The = m=3D inister did go to the front door during the second stanza (and did not = sing)=3D , but did not leave. <BR> Your silence is assumed assent!<BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Times New Roman"><BR> I LOVE it! &nbsp;Terrifico!!!<BR> <BR> May his tribe prosper and multiply throughout the Church. &nbsp;<BR> <BR> Alan</FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3131295387_31654833--    
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a Name From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:30:10 EST     --part1_17c.185d502c.2bafb9a2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   >Most congregations need far less power for hymn-singing that people = might=3D20 >think.=3DA0 It is not necessary to drown the congregation in sound.=3DA0 = =3DA0 OH=3D S=3D20 >conventions prove that EVERY year.   That's ture....many organists do overpower their congregations when = playing=3D20=3D a=3D20 hymn. The organs shown at OHS conventions, however, were built = differently=3D20 than most are today. I've played some wonderful old turn of the = century=3D20 trackers. The harmonic structure of some of the ranks is amazing. In = the=3D20 small town in Connecticut that my mother is from, there are two organs = from=3D20 the 1800's that are still in use. The Episcopal church has a 7 or 8 = rank=3D20 instrument (the builder escapes me at the moment) and the Methodist = church=3D20 has a 16 or 18 rank Johnson. The Methodist organ packs a punch. There is = n=3D o=3D20 mixture on it and the only reed is an Oboe on the Swell. The Pedal = division=3D =3D20 consists solely of a 16' Subbass that rattles the building. The Great Pr incipal chorus can adequately lead singing because there is so much = harmonic=3D =3D20 development. When the 2' is drawn, it sounds as if there is a small = mixture=3D =3D20 playing. It is the most silvery sound. The 8' Open on the Great is = beefy,=3D20 not small of scale and not wooly. It's a rich warm sound. One only needs = t=3D o=3D20 use the Great chorus to adequately lead the singing there. These days, = many=3D =3D20 builders just build a rank of pipes. There is no charater to the sound. = Th=3D e=3D20 reason the organist needs to have all sorts of resources is because there = is=3D =3D20 nothing silvery about the 8, 4, 2 Principal chorus. You have to have=3D20 mixtures and reeds to get any kind of brilliance on many organs built = today.   My comment about playing a service on a 3 rank Reuter being dull stems = from=3D20 the fact that the congregation I was subbing for could outsing the organ. = I=3D =3D20 might as well not have been playing, because if I, sitting next to the = pipes=3D =3D20 couldn't hear myself, the conrgegation couldn't hear, either. As to it = not=3D20 being musically satisfying, it wasn't. It wasn't that the pipework was = bad,=3D =3D20 it just wasn't a particularly lyric Principal, the Flute was bland, and = the=3D20 String, while good, was just too soft. Sure I made music, but it was = just=3D20 boring.   <It has always amazed me that people who don't like tracker organs = always=3D20 seem=3D20 >to play one that is in deplorable condition.=3DA0 =3DA0 Very likely a few = hours=3D of=3D20 >adjustment could have had the organ above playing fairly well.   I will be the first to admit that I'm not a fan of trackers. Why drive = a=3D20 Model T Ford when I can have a state of the art 2003 model car. Bach = always=3D =3D20 wanted the most modern things on the instruments he designed and played, = why=3D =3D20 should we in the 21st century be different. Since Bach was on the = cutting=3D20 edge, I'm going to be also. I think that he'd be using MIDI, pistons, and swell boxes. It would = be=3D20 amazing to see what kind of organ designs he'd come up with today if he = had=3D20 electric actions, combination actions, and modern blowers, not to mention = th=3D e=3D20 compositions he'd be publishing. Anyway, the tracker organ that I = was=3D20 referring to in my earlier post was beyond repair. Three or four = area=3D20 companies all came to service the organ and gave the church a report as = to=3D20 the status of the organ and what could be done. None of them wanted = anythin=3D g=3D20 to do with it because it was so bad. When it was installed about 15 or = 16=3D20 years ago, the church paid over $250,000 for it. It was not a large=3D20 instrument--14 or 15 ranks. They thought because they paid an arm and a = leg=3D =3D20 for it that it was good. It was like an organ in California that Ed = Stout=3D20 was called to take a look at. After he looked at it, he went back to = the=3D20 office and wrote up three proposals for what could be done. He numbered = the=3D =3D20 first one and taped a matchstick to the page. The same for proposal = number=3D20=3D 2=3D20 and number 3. The current Music Director at the aforementioned church is = a=3D20 friend of mine. He had a bid from one pipe organ company to build a = brand=3D20 new instrument of similar size for not too much more money than = originally=3D20 spent on it. The sad thing was that the music director and the organist = who=3D =3D20 were there at the timeof installation didn't have any musical training. = The=3D y=3D20 didn't know any better, so the thinking was expensive=3D3Dgood. The = organ=3D20 builder (who around this area is known for building inferior = instruments)=3D20 just slapped together this organ, and it was just a hodge podge of stuff = tha=3D t=3D20 didn't work together, plus he didn't use quality materials for the action. = =3D20 The church decided to scrap the whole thing and bought a large digital = organ=3D ..=3D20 What is sad is that the digital sounds better than the pipe organ did. = Non=3D e=3D20 of the pipes were properly voiced, and very few of the valves and = sliders=3D20 were aligned, so pipe speech was poor and the pipes were under winded. = The=3D20 keyboards warped within a few years of installation and were never = properly=3D20 adjusted, so while the casework was beautiful, the instrument was not. = It=3D20 was beyond being salvaged. When the digital organ was installed, the=3D20 pipework was taken out by a local organ builder. I saw some of the pipes = an=3D d=3D20 they were in bad shape. Most of the metal pipes were collapsing on=3D20 themselves, seams were split apart due to bad solder, wooden pipes = were=3D20 coming unglued. The interesting thing is that the original builder went = out=3D =3D20 of business a few years after this organ was installed, but his other = local=3D20 installations all suffered from the same kinds of trouble. So it's not = just=3D =3D20 that I played "one bad tracker", this organ was a dog from the get go. = =3D20 I've played some fantastic tracker organs. The owner of the funeral = home=3D20 where I work is a member of a Presbyterian church with a two manual = Gabriel=3D20 Kney tracker. It is silvery and rich and warm. The action is easy to = play=3D20 and well adjusted. The only maintenance ever done to it is oiling the = blowe=3D r=3D20 and touching up the reeds. It's 24 ranks and easily sounds like twice = the=3D20 size. This instrument is from 1986 and the interior looks like it was = just=3D20 installed last year. It's a marvelous example of first-rate = craftsmanship.=3D20=3D =3D20 That is one instrument that I wouldn't mind playing on a regular basis. = I'v=3D e=3D20 played a recital on it and had a blast with it. I've subbed for church = there=3D =3D20 many times and loved every minute of it. =3D20   My point is this: while I'm not a tracker fan, I can (and do) make = beautifu=3D l=3D20 music on one. I can play a service on a 3 rank unit organ, too. However, = I=3D =3D20 wouldn't want to play a service on an instrument that isn't suited for = the=3D20 job it's required to do.=3D20   Monty Bennett=3D20 =3D20         --part1_17c.185d502c.2bafb9a2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">&gt;Most congregations need far less power for = hymn-si=3D nging that people might <BR> &gt;think.=3DA0 It is not necessary to drown the congregation in = sound.=3DA0=3D20=3D =3DA0 OHS <BR> &gt;conventions prove that EVERY year.<BR> <BR> That's ture....many organists do overpower their congregations when = playing=3D20=3D a hymn.&nbsp; The organs shown at OHS conventions, however, were built = diffe=3D rently than most are today.&nbsp; I've played some wonderful old turn of = the=3D century trackers.&nbsp; The harmonic structure of some of the ranks is = amaz=3D ing.&nbsp; In the small town in Connecticut that my mother is from, there = ar=3D e two organs from the 1800's that are still in use.&nbsp; The Episcopal = chur=3D ch has a 7 or 8 rank instrument (the builder escapes me at the moment) and = t=3D he Methodist church has a 16 or 18 rank Johnson.&nbsp; The Methodist organ p=3D acks a punch.&nbsp; There is no mixture on it and the only reed is an Oboe = o=3D n the Swell.&nbsp; The Pedal division consists solely of a 16' Subbass = that=3D20=3D rattles the building.&nbsp; The Great Principal chorus can adequately lead = s=3D inging because there is so much harmonic development.&nbsp; When the 2' is = d=3D rawn, it sounds as if there is a small mixture playing.&nbsp; It is the = most=3D silvery sound.&nbsp; The 8' Open on the Great is beefy, not small of = scale=3D20=3D and not wooly.&nbsp; It's a rich warm sound.&nbsp; One only needs to use = the=3D Great chorus to adequately lead the singing there.&nbsp; These days, many = b=3D uilders just build a rank of pipes.&nbsp; There is no charater to the = sound.=3D &nbsp; The reason the organist needs to have all sorts of resources is = becau=3D se there is nothing silvery about the 8, 4, 2 Principal chorus.&nbsp; You = ha=3D ve to have mixtures and reeds to get any kind of brilliance on many organs = b=3D uilt today.<BR> <BR> My comment about playing a service on a 3 rank Reuter being dull stems = from=3D20=3D the fact that the congregation I was subbing for could outsing the = organ.&nb=3D sp; I might as well not have been playing, because if I, sitting next to = the=3D pipes couldn't hear myself, the conrgegation couldn't hear, either.&nbsp; = A=3D s to it not being musically satisfying, it wasn't.&nbsp; It wasn't that = the=3D20=3D pipework was bad, it just wasn't a particularly lyric Principal, the Flute = w=3D as bland, and the String, while good, was just too soft.&nbsp; Sure I made = m=3D usic, but it was just boring.<BR> <BR> &lt;It has always amazed me that people who don't like tracker organs = always=3D seem <BR> &gt;to play one that is in deplorable condition.=3DA0 =3DA0 Very likely a = few ho=3D urs of <BR> &gt;adjustment could have had the organ above playing fairly well.<BR> <BR> I will be the first to admit that I'm not a fan of trackers.&nbsp; Why = drive=3D a Model T Ford when I can have a state of the art 2003 model car.&nbsp; = Bac=3D h always wanted the most modern things on the instruments he designed and = pl=3D ayed, why should we in the 21st century be different.&nbsp; Since Bach was = o=3D n the cutting edge, I'm going to be also.<BR> I think that he'd be using MIDI, pistons, and swell boxes.&nbsp; It would = be=3D amazing to see what kind of organ designs he'd come up with today if he = had=3D electric actions, combination actions, and modern blowers, not to mention = t=3D he compositions he'd be publishing.&nbsp; Anyway, the tracker organ that I = w=3D as referring to in my earlier post was beyond repair.&nbsp; Three or four = ar=3D ea companies all came to service the organ and gave the church a report as = t=3D o the status of the organ and what could be done.&nbsp; None of them = wanted=3D20=3D anything to do with it because it was so bad.&nbsp; When it was installed = ab=3D out 15 or 16 years ago, the church paid over $250,000 for it.&nbsp; It was = n=3D ot a large instrument--14 or 15 ranks.&nbsp; They thought because they = paid=3D20=3D an arm and a leg for it that it was good.&nbsp; It was like an organ in = Cali=3D fornia that Ed Stout was called to take a look at.&nbsp; After he looked = at=3D20=3D it, he went back to the office and wrote up three proposals for what could = b=3D e done.&nbsp; He numbered the first one and taped a matchstick to the = page.&=3D nbsp; The same for proposal number 2 and number 3.&nbsp; The current Music = D=3D irector at the aforementioned church is a friend of mine.&nbsp; He had a = bid=3D from one pipe organ company to build a brand new instrument of similar = size=3D for not too much more money than originally spent on it.&nbsp; The sad = thin=3D g was that the music director and the organist who were there at the = timeof=3D20=3D installation didn't have any musical training.&nbsp; They didn't know any = be=3D tter, so the thinking was expensive=3D3Dgood.&nbsp; The organ builder (who = aro=3D und this area is known for building inferior instruments) just slapped = toget=3D her this organ, and it was just a hodge podge of stuff that didn't work = toge=3D ther, plus he didn't use quality materials for the action.&nbsp; The church=3D20=3D decided to scrap the whole thing and bought a large digital organ.&nbsp; = Wha=3D t is sad is that the digital sounds better than the pipe organ did.&nbsp; = No=3D ne of the pipes were properly voiced, and very few of the valves and = sliders=3D were aligned, so pipe speech was poor and the pipes were under = winded.&nbsp=3D ; The keyboards warped within a few years of installation and were never = pro=3D perly adjusted, so while the casework was beautiful, the instrument was = not.=3D &nbsp; It was beyond being salvaged.&nbsp; When the digital organ was = instal=3D led, the pipework was taken out by a local organ builder.&nbsp; I saw some = o=3D f the pipes and they were in bad shape.&nbsp; Most of the metal pipes were = c=3D ollapsing on themselves, seams were split apart due to bad solder, wooden = pi=3D pes were coming unglued.&nbsp; The interesting thing is that the original = bu=3D ilder went out of business a few years after this organ was installed, but = h=3D is other local installations all suffered from the same kinds of = trouble.&nb=3D sp; So it's not just that I played "one bad tracker", this organ was a dog = f=3D rom the get go.&nbsp; <BR> I've played some fantastic tracker organs.&nbsp; The owner of the funeral = ho=3D me where I work is a member of a Presbyterian church with a two manual = Gabri=3D el Kney tracker.&nbsp; It is silvery and rich and warm.&nbsp; The action = is=3D20=3D easy to play and well adjusted.&nbsp; The only maintenance ever done to it = i=3D s oiling the blower and touching up the reeds.&nbsp; It's 24 ranks and = easil=3D y sounds like twice the size.&nbsp; This instrument is from 1986 and the = int=3D erior looks like it was just installed last year.&nbsp; It's a marvelous = exa=3D mple of first-rate craftsmanship.&nbsp; That is one instrument that I = wouldn=3D 't mind playing on a regular basis.&nbsp; I've played a recital on it and = ha=3D d a blast with it. I've subbed for church there many times and loved every = m=3D inute of it.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> My point is this:&nbsp; while I'm not a tracker fan, I can (and do) make = bea=3D utiful music on one.&nbsp; I can play a service on a 3 rank unit organ, = too.=3D &nbsp; However, I wouldn't want to play a service on an instrument that = isn'=3D t suited for the job it's required to do. <BR> <BR> Monty Bennett <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_17c.185d502c.2bafb9a2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a Name From: "Mura Kievman" <mura@speakeasy.org> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:56:53 -0500   At 08:30 PM 3/23/2003 -0500, Monte wrote:   ><Most congregations need far less power for hymn-singing that people >might think. It is not necessary to drown the congregation in >sound. OHS conventions prove that EVERY year.> > >That's ture....many organists do overpower their congregations when >playing a hymn.     As the soprano soloist at our small church in Brooklyn may I add a loud AMEN! Our organist is not a "real" organist -- she's a pianist who's studied organ and plays it (even the pedals!). But she thinks that she is =   supporting the congregation by playing the organ at full blast. All she does is make it so that the quartet, standing in front of her and underneath the pipes (we're in a balcony above the congregation -- what would be the bima in a jewish temple -- at the front of the church), absolutely cannot hear ourselves. It's very hard to make her understand that she does NOT need to play so loudly. Ours is a singing congregation .... they don't need that much assistance!   Of course, it isn't quite so bad for them downstairs as it is for us = UPstairs!   Mura      
(back) Subject: Re: defunct builders From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 21:04:26 -0600     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Philip Thibault" <pthibaul@maine.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>; "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2003 5:19 PM Subject: Re: defunct builders     > OK--here goes a response to one of the hundreds of wonderful posts--Believe > it or not, this list has improved my speed reading capibility to NO END. > > As to the Quality of Estey Pipes--my residence organ is a pretty much intact > (except for case and the bottom Great Open Diapason pipes) T-P! I find = my 7 > rank organ really perfect for the basement room because of Estey's practice > of using Haskell basses--nice and compact for the 7 foot ceiling. The organ > is a stock 1913 vintage of SW stopped flute, salicional, Harmonic Flute = 4, > GT Dulciana, Melodia, Open Diapason and PED 16 Bourdon. Couplers are = all TP > 16-8-4 stuff. Really a lot of smooth, clear sounds of very well built > pipes. And they Say "ESTEY sure knew how to build a GREAT organ bench!" > > Sadly, the TP (which doesn't mean toilet paper but it should) action = only > works beautifully when the humidity is EXACT. Too damp in the summer = and it > is sluggish, too dry in the winter and it shuts down. Aside from = prudent > use of the humidifier and dehumidifier, what suggestions are there? > > My good ol' friend Earl Miller suggested just running the thing through = a > planer (I think removing the pipes first) but what do youse guys think? > > Phil > > ---------- > >From: Gary Black <gblack@ocslink.com> > >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > >Subject: defunct builders > >Date: Sat, Mar 22, 2003, 12:40 PM > > > > > HI list, I would like some opinions, and reason to support them, = about > > defunct organ builders like: Estey, Hinners and Henry Pilcher's sons. I > > have most of my residence organ pipework from an 1905 Estey, an oboe from a > > 1923 Hinners and have access to a Henry Pilcher's Sons organ of 1922. Just > > curious as to what you think of them as far as quailty, reliabilty = etc. All > > of these organs in a former life were of T-P design. Thanks, Gary > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >