PipeChat Digest #3660 - Thursday, May 8, 2003
 
CA: The Redlands Organ Festival (long,  x- posted)
  by <patmai@juno.com>
Update on Wm. Jewell College, Liberty, MO
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Update on First Congregational's 4/66 Kimball rebuild
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Paging Charlie Lester (X-Posted)!
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Felix Hell in Bloomsburg, PA
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
West Point organ recital: Meredith E. Baker 4-27-03
  by <patmai@juno.com>
Re: Keith's and Lee's Wedding in NY with Felix Hell, organist
  by "David Carter" <davidorganist2002@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: CA: The Redlands Organ Festival (long, x- posted) From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 22:43:00 -0400   Greetings again, PipeChatters! It has been requested that I bring the following to your attention:   FROM: Irmengard Jennings Adjunct Professor of Organ University of Redlands School of Music PO 3080 Redlands, CA 92373-0999   Roaring 20's Pipe Organ Resurrected: Redlands Organ Festival   The University of Redlands School of Music announces the return of the annual Redlands Organ Festival. Four world class organists have been selected to perform on the 1927 Casavant Pipe Organ now reinstalled into the university's refurbished Memorial Chapel. The Festival will take place Sunday, May 11 through Wednesday, May 14.   The organ project is the capstone to the Memorial Chapel renovation and presents to the public a rare early 20th century organ. This instrument is unique in Southern California as it is a vintage Grand Symphonic Organ repaired by the original builder.   In 1927 the School of Music selected the Casavant Bros. firm of Canada as the builder best able to fulfill its vision for an instrument for its newly constructed chapel. Today, the Casavant firm is one of a select few whose name continues to appear as the builder of world class organs for schools and concert halls. And, the builders have delivered a modern organ that continues the original vision into the future.   The Inaugural recital will be played by Pierre Pincemaille on Sunday, May 11 at 5:00 p.m. Mr. Pincemaille is Titular Organist of the Cathedral-Basilica of St-Denis, in Paris, France, home of the first of the great Cavaill=E9-Coll organs. Today, Mr. Pincemaille is widely regarded as the artistic successor to Pierre Cochereau because of his prowess at and style of improvisation which will be featured in the evening's program.   Craig S. Williams will play the Monday evening recital. Mr. Williams is the Organist and Director of Music at the Cadet Chapel, United States Military Academy at West Point, NY, where he plays the world's largest church pipe organ. This landmark organ attracts visiting dignitaries from around the world and Mr. Williams regularly performs the great masterworks for these functions at the Academy. He is only the fourth person to hold the position since the chapel was erected in 1910. He also serves on the faculty of the conservatory division at Westminster Choir College.   The Welch-Hancock Duo performs organ and piano duos on Tuesday evening. James Welch, organist, and Russell Hancock, pianist, collaborate as the premiere organ-piano team in the United States. Their duo works form the core of a small but significant repertoire which is rarely performed. Mr. Hancock will be using the University's new 9' Steinway Concert grand piano.   The closing recital on Wednesday evening will be played by J. Christopher Pardini, Senior Organist at the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove. Mr. Pardini is seen weekly on the Hour of Power telecast where he presides at the Hazel Wright Organ. In addition, he directs the Cathedral Chorale, a semiprofessional choral ensemble that sings for the cathedral's Sunday evening service.   Sunday's Inaugural Concert is free of charge. The Monday through Wednesday concerts start at 7:30 p.m., with a $10 admission fee. Tickets are available at the door. For additional concert information or Festival registration, contact Irmengard Jennings at 909-793-2121, ext. 3264   Festival Schedule Sunday, May 11 5:00 INAUGURAL CONCERT: Pierre Pincemaille 7:30 Reception   Monday, May 12 9:00 Registration Opens 9:30 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Jacquelin Rochette 11:30 Lunch 1:15 LECTURE/DEMONSTRATION: Craig Williams: The Instrument from the Organist's Perspective 3:15 MASTERCLASS: Pierre Pincemaille 6:00 Dinner 7:30 CONCERT: Craig Williams 9:00 Reception   Tuesday, May 13 9:00 Registration 9:00 LECTURE/DEMONSTRATION: Jacquelin Rochette: The Casavant Organ 11:30 Lunch 1:15 LECTURE: Craig Williams: Registration 3:15 LECTURE: James Welch & Russell Hancock 5:00 Dinner 7:30 CONCERT: Welch/Hancock Duo 9:00 Reception   Wednesday, May 14 9:00 Registration 9:30 LECTURE: Craig Williams: Hymn Playing 11:30 Lunch 1:15 DEMONSTRATION/LECTURE: Christopher Pardini 3:15 STUDENT RECITAL 5:00 Closing Banquet 7:30 CONCERT: Christopher Pardini 9:00 Reception   Coffee: 8:00, 10:00 & 3:00 Daily. Exhibits Open 10:00 to 5:00 Daily.   If you attend, please greet Craig Williams for me. Pat Maimone Post Chapel, West Point, NY Oct 1975 - June 2003 patmai@juno.com   ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!  
(back) Subject: Update on Wm. Jewell College, Liberty, MO From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 22:42:30 EDT     --part1_50.1c5b4cdd.2beb1e16_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   May 7, 2003 Greater Kansas City   I've just returned from an errand which took me from downtown Kansas City, =   Missouri, north to the campus of William Jewell College, Liberty, MO, = where dozens of students, college personnel and area volunteers are still busily =   working to return their campus to a semblance of order and dignity = following Sunday's tornado.   After confirming with college personnel that the newly dedicated 3 manual/pedal - 55 rank Quimby Pipe Organ suffered no destruction in Gano Chapel, I was walking down a flight of concrete stairs (part of the = sidewalk leading downhill from the Chapel, about 60,' to the roadway and the = Pillsbury Music Building). I couldn't help but notice the strong, wonderful = fragrance of lilac bushes in full bloom which encompassed those stairs.   A young woman was immediately behind me. I commented to her about the = lilacs; she replied in a very disheartened, but kindly voice: "it's so difficult = to notice anything beautiful with what's happened, but thank you for drawing = my attention to them; they are wonderfully fragrant." Her momentary change = in mood caused me to rejoice that I had taken the opportunity to speak to her =   and that those few words broke into her anguish for just a brief moment.   In case you aren't aware: this was to be finals week at Wm. Jewell = College. Baccalaureate and Commencement are scheduled for this coming Saturday morning. Those events will still take place, but far off-campus, at a = church quite removed from the college. What a bummer for the graduates - after living "on the hill" for four years! The school's tradition includes a final walk around the Quad before each year's concluding exercises - a tradition they cannot keep as the 2003 = school year closes.   The joy of graduating will be with Wm. Jewell's seniors (and I'm = prayerful, and certain, that they will also have the joy of knowing that all their = lives were spared -- knowing that the storm outcome could have been far worse if =   lives had been lost).   For the non-seniors, the college closed abruptly. Signs posted on doors of =   every building indicated that "students' grades for the term will reflect = the highest grade achieved at any time during the term" -- and that any = appeals should be addressed to the Dean of Students -- if dire circumstances = merited such.   I saw many middle-aged persons assisting their sons and daughters in = packing cars, vans and small trucks, moving out for the summer, but earlier that usual this year. I also saw a sign - in large red letters - which I will never forget. It =   says: "5-4-03 changed our campus forever." Pessimistic? I think not.   I believe that the students, staff and/or faculty who made that sign = likely heard the horrific storm as it passed overhead; they heard hundreds of = glass windows and doors breaking and the moan of nails and screws being sucked = from wooden trusses and walls; they heard hundred-year-old trees being pulled = from the ground, roots & all. I believe those persons, though siting that their =   campus (and their lives) have been impacted indellibly, are counting their =   blessings as they pack what remains of their belongings.   And, with the bittersweet heart-tugs that always accompany the end of = seasons in our lives, (such as the end of a year attending college with beloved = old -and new- friends), they gave pause in making that sign to reflect and = mark the event as part of their "forever" experience.   As I approached Pillsbury Music building's porch and front doors, I = stopped to read an announcement poster which yielded very good news. "The William =   Jewell College Choir's trip to England and Scotland will still be made." = They depart next Monday, as planned. The testament of life and love and virtue which they have prepared for months will still be shared abroad = (literally) in places such as Ely Cathdral (to name but one place on their journey).   God bless them, everyone! And, thanks be to God for God's goodness.   Dale G. Rider   --part1_50.1c5b4cdd.2beb1e16_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">May 7, 2003<BR> Greater Kansas City<BR> <BR> I've just returned from an errand which took me from downtown Kansas City, = M=3D issouri, north to the campus of William Jewell College, Liberty, MO, where = d=3D ozens of students, college personnel and area volunteers are still busily = wo=3D rking to return their campus to a semblance of order and dignity following = S=3D unday's tornado.<BR> <BR> After confirming with college personnel that the newly dedicated 3 = manual/pe=3D dal - 55 rank Quimby Pipe Organ suffered no destruction in Gano Chapel, I = wa=3D s walking down a flight of concrete stairs (part of the sidewalk leading = dow=3D nhill from the Chapel, about 60,' to the roadway and the Pillsbury Music = Bui=3D lding). I couldn't help but notice the strong, wonderful fragrance of = lilac=3D20=3D bushes in full bloom which encompassed those stairs. <BR> <BR> A young woman was immediately behind me. I commented to her about the = lilacs=3D ; she replied in a very disheartened, but kindly voice: "it's so difficult = t=3D o notice anything beautiful with what's happened, but thank you for = drawing=3D20=3D my attention to them; they are wonderfully fragrant."&nbsp; Her momentary = ch=3D ange in mood caused me to rejoice that I had taken the opportunity to = speak=3D20=3D to her and that those few words broke into her anguish for just a brief = mome=3D nt. <BR> <BR> In case you aren't aware<B>:</B>&nbsp; this was to be finals week at Wm. = Jew=3D ell College. Baccalaureate and Commencement are scheduled for this coming = Sa=3D turday morning. Those events will still take place, but far off-campus, at = a=3D church quite removed from the college. What a bummer for the graduates - = af=3D ter living "on the hill" for four years!<BR> The school's tradition includes a final walk around the Quad before each = yea=3D r's concluding exercises - a tradition they cannot keep as the 2003 school = y=3D ear closes.<BR> <BR> The joy of graduating <B><I>will be</B></I> with Wm. Jewell's seniors (and = I=3D 'm prayerful, and certain, that they will also have the joy of knowing = that=3D20=3D <B>all</B> their lives were spared -- knowing that the storm outcome could = h=3D ave been far worse if lives had been lost).<BR> <BR> For the non-seniors, the college closed abruptly. Signs posted on doors of = e=3D very building indicated that "students' grades for the term will reflect = the=3D highest grade achieved at any time during the term" -- and that any = appeals=3D should be addressed to the Dean of Students -- if dire circumstances = merite=3D d such. <BR> <BR> I saw many middle-aged persons assisting their sons and daughters in = packing=3D cars, vans and small trucks, moving out for the summer, but earlier that = us=3D ual this year. <BR> I also saw a sign - in large red letters - which I will never = forget.&nbsp;&=3D nbsp; It says:&nbsp; "</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#ff0000" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-CO=3D LOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"0"><B>5-4=3D -03 changed our campus forever.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = style=3D3D"BACK=3D GROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"=3D 0"></B>"&nbsp; Pessimistic?&nbsp; I think not.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> I believe that the students, staff and/or faculty who made that sign = likely=3D20=3D heard the horrific storm as it passed overhead; they heard hundreds of = glass=3D windows and doors breaking and the moan of nails and screws being sucked = fr=3D om wooden trusses and walls; they heard hundred-year-old trees being = pulled=3D20=3D from the ground, roots &amp; all. I believe those persons, though siting = tha=3D t their campus (and their lives) have been impacted indellibly, are = counting=3D their blessings as they pack what remains of their belongings.&nbsp; <BR> <BR> And, with the bittersweet heart-tugs that always accompany the end of season=3D s in our lives, (such as the end of a year attending college with beloved = ol=3D d <I>-and new-</I> friends), they gave pause in making that sign to = reflect=3D20=3D and mark the event as part of their "forever" experience.<BR> <BR> As I approached Pillsbury Music building's porch and front doors, I = stopped=3D20=3D to read an announcement poster which yielded very good news.&nbsp; "The = Will=3D iam Jewell College Choir's trip to England and Scotland will still be = made."=3D They depart next Monday, as planned. The testament of life and love and = vir=3D tue which they have prepared for&nbsp; months will still be shared abroad = (l=3D iterally) in places such as Ely Cathdral (to name but one place on their = jou=3D rney). <BR> <BR> God bless them, everyone!&nbsp; And, thanks be to God for God's = goodness.<BR=3D > <BR> Dale G. Rider</FONT></HTML>   --part1_50.1c5b4cdd.2beb1e16_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Update on First Congregational's 4/66 Kimball rebuild From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Wed, 07 May 2003 22:54:30 -0400   Greetings, The following information was given to attendees of G. Dene Barnard's = Farewell concert held in the First Congregational Church in Columbus, = Ohio.   Status of the Kimball organ restoration   At the beginning of Barnard's recital, the audience found themselves = facing the back of the newly restored Kimball console's back. During the = intermission, the console was turned 180 degrees so that the keyboards = were visible to concertgoers. The console was removed March 4,2002, and = returned May 1, 2003. It has been completely refinished. The original = ivory has been kept with the exception of the keyboard ivory which was = replaced with new (and legal) ivory.   The Peebles-Herzog Organ Company is doing the restoration which began in = January 2002, and is expected to continue through mid-2004.   All of the console's electrical mechanism has been converted to = solid-state. The pedals have been refurbished and the original toe studs = restored. The console now sits on a steel framed platform that rides on = low-profile wheels and is covered with matching oak. The console can now = be easily moved into the chancel for concerts, etc. The original console = proved to be virtually impossible to move.   The Echo division, located on the west wall of the gallery, was removed = February 11, 2002, and returned January 15, 2003 after being completely = restored.   The Solo and Swell divisions are currently being worked on at the Organ = Company. The chambers that house these divisions are being cleaned, = painted and electrical and and mechanical systems are being updated. The = blower system has also been restored and the blower room updated.   This information was provided by Rick Sayre of the First Congregational = Church.   Musically,   Stan Krider    
(back) Subject: Paging Charlie Lester (X-Posted)! From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 07 May 2003 22:45:08 -0500   Dear Listers:   Does anyone have another EMAIL address for Charlie Lester? I got the following message when I wrote to him earlier this evening:   <charlie@137.com>: Sorry, no mailbox here by that name.   And I had just gotten an EMAIL from him on MONDAY!   Anyone know what gives?   Faithfully,   G.A.   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS    
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Bloomsburg, PA From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 23:55:36 -0400   Dear Lists and Friends,   Well, on Sunday, May 4th, instead of the Organists' traditional = post-church Super Sized Lunch and nap, I drove 200 miles, to Bloomsburg, = Pennsylvania. The purposes were several. One was to hear Felix on a sort of mongrel = Organ at 1st Presbyterian Church, and another was to visit friend Harry = Martenas, Organist of that church, on his home turf. This was also a chance to meet Alan Baker, Music Director of the church. He teaches at Bloomsberg University, and is bringing his University Choir to Connecticut to sing at my church next week. (Trinity Episcopal Church, Stamford, 5/12 at 7:30). = All of those purposes were well fulfilled and more, on this evening.   The first part of the program was music of J. S. Bach, and while I missed = my Super Sized Lunch, I got something Super, a Super Coupled Organ! My goodness, the poor thing was really working hard - only 27 Stops trying to fill a quite large (and very handsome) building. We discovered later, with benefit of Felix's considerable registrational skills, that there is a lot of nice pipework at the mf level and below, but the pity is that both in recital and in liturgy, the full sound must always be the same, and with = the Super Coupler being the only way to find any brilliance and excitement, it is more than a little wearing. Therefore, the opening of the Fantasy = &Fugue in G Minor was missing some of its luster, and one waited for the lovely Cantilena sections, which Felix does in his own unique way, one that = works. Felix chases Fugues, and everyone catches them, and the big ones, like the one for this piece, and also the one for the D Major P&F which we will = hear later, sparkle plenty. The tempi are bright, the articulation clear, and accuracy is never an issue. People, even without polyphonic listening skills, really do respond.   J. S. Bach - Trio Sonata No. 1 in E Flat Major. Throughout, Felix showed = his genius at registration, perhaps nowhere more than in the Adagio, which was gorgeous! In the final Allegro, the tempo was the usual "Felixissimo", otherwise known as breathtaking, with a great big bright registration, and it really was totally thrilling.   Closing the Bach section of the recital was the D Major Prelude and Fugue. Here, the lack of luster in the plenum sounds was somewhat rendered = helpless against what I feel is a sensitivity and sense of drama that has been growing steadily in Felix's musical mind over the years. One tended to notice the sound less, taken over by the music. As with the G Minor before it, the Fugue was a sure winner, as it danced its way to the end.   Last on the first part of the program, the Mendelssohn 1st Sonata in F Minor, an essentially perfect performance. The interplay between the big stuff and the choral was deftly done, and the sound worked out for the choral was another of those lovely mf registrations, as was the sound for the following Adagio. The complexities of the Recitative section were made to sound easy. The last movement, <Allegro assai vivace> surely had enough vivace in it to satisfy anyone. There's great excitement in that movement, and we got full benefit of it all.   Intermission   Happy and complete is the person who knows intimately the Three Chorals of Cesar Franck. Felix plays all three, and tonight gave us the A Minor, No. = 3, a piece full of drama, but also replete with moments of touching beauty. = If you have any doubts about a musician, I suppose the beautiful Adagio in = this work would settle those doubts one way or another. Not that anyone has any doubt about Felix, but it is nice to have your assurance confirmed, and = for that same Adagio, he found a most lovely sound. (He hasn't always, but = that' s another, old, story!) This really was a stunning performance, with Felix picking up every cue from the music, and responding fully. It was very impressive.   The Rheinberger <Abendfriede>, evening peace, was so lovely that it = probably surpassed even those performances of our own Glenda, reports to the = contrary notwithstanding. It ended with three chimes, surely much appreciated by members of the church, and Rheinberger would have been pleased as well.   Mendelssohn's Sonata 6, built around the choral <Vater unser im Himmelreich>, is a regular part of Felix's repertoire. I think the only Sonatas from Opus 65 that I have not heard him play, in fact, are numbers four and five. I may have missed something. As with Sonata 1 played in the first half, this was a truly loving and thoughtful performance. Many of us who were at a Felix birthday performance shortly after the events of = 9/11/01 recall him playing this Sonata as a memorial on that occasion, at St. = Peter' s in Manhattan. The memory of his performance of the beautiful Andante at the end stays with me, and, as he duplicated that feeling in Bloomsburg, many others will have joined that memory.   Last on the program, two movements from the Widor 5th Symphony, the = Adagio, followed by You Know What! My recent hearings of the Adagio have been in a very resonant room, in which the music can flow ever so slowly, and bloom properly. Felix's Adagio seemed a little quick to me, but perhaps that is = a fair response to a not very lively room, and, of course, my hearing of it = is somewhat affected by my recent hearings. It was, in fact, quite beautiful, and when the Dynamite blew up in the next movement, it was quite dramatic, and the rather big house erupted suitably, and quickly got itself to its feet - and stayed there and continued to clap until it got what it wanted. = I turned to Harry Martenas, Organist of the church, and commented that we = had already had the encore, so what might be next.   It was the Gigout Toccata, complete with a double glissando in the Pedals = at the end, apparently courtesy of Virgil Fox. So ended a beautiful recital, the happy audience heading off to the church hall for a reception, where Felix greeted all cheerfully for quite a long time.   This event was the final one in the church's first try at a concert = series. This was the only Organ recital, and, interestingly, it got one of the = very best crowds. This will have been helped by the fact that the concert was co-sponsored by the Susquehanna Valley Chapter of the AGO, Dennis = Huthnance, Dean. The series has been a success, and the seriousness of all involved = was manifest in the whole experience of attending, right from the beginning. Earnest and efficient people collected money, and others handed out a very handsomely printed program. But the reception, ah, the reception has = always to me signaled the spirit of such an enterprise. Making a happy = environment, with some good food and drink, where people may assemble after a concert, and also meet the artist, raises the enterprise to a higher level, and = that is not just because I enjoy nice food. The steering committee for the = series consisted of Dr. Alan Baker, Music Director, Harry Martenas, Organist, and Nancy Presswood, to whom we owe the reception. I left with a really good feeling about the afternoon. Fine music played by a superb player, a = chance to visit good friends, including the Hells (Felix's mother, Olga, was here on a visit), and Harry Martenas, Organist. A good time was had by all.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com                      
(back) Subject: West Point organ recital: Meredith E. Baker 4-27-03 From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Thu, 8 May 2003 00:14:14 -0400   Dear Pipechatters,   On a glorious spring Sunday, many folks from Long Island, home of the Long Island Choral Society, or LICS, which she conducts, as well as the Hudson Valley made the trek to West Point's Cadet Chapel to hear Meredith Elaine Baker's outstanding organ recital. Security on post was particularly tight that day, perhaps because there was another performance at Eisenhower Hall, which seats 4, 400 patrons. After a welcome and introduction from host organist Craig Williams, Meredith began her program with blind English organist John Stanley's Voluntary in C Major. She concluded the recital with the famous "Pasticcio" from the Ten Pieces by blind French organist Jean Langlais.   In between those two, she played Bach's Prelude in B minor BWV 544.1 in what she announced was her first public performance of this masterwork. Her registrations featured several different divisions of the large four-manual instrument with its 12 divisions and 22,000 pipes for the three episodes.. According to curator Gary Ferguson, one was played on the Echo Principal 8 and 2', another on the flutes in the Nave, the third on the Swell. It was a powerful Bach B minor Prelude, played with assurance.   The next German work, Paul Hindemith's Sonate III based on German folk songs, was one which she had worked on with Paul Maynard. It was very carefully registered, one could hear all the lines clearly.. She chose various reeds as solo instruments.. Tempos were secure.   On to the French part of the program.. she started with Cesar Franck's "Pastorale".. The performance was very expressive.   The Chorale in A minor, she said was an "old friend.." having played it since her first recital as a senior in high school. ... Adagio was quite expressive, especially at the end of that section. Her dynamic buildup was powerful indeed, with registration changes happening right on cue.   The Langlais was next; the trompete en chamade was heard in four-part harmony. That can be dangerous to anyone standing beneath the protruding pipes, but she got away with it at the end of "Pasticcio."   The crowd's standing ovation led her to reprise Manuel de Falla's "Ritual Fire Dance," a work she had played in Valley Stream, L. I., quite a while ago. She has set quite a standard for USMA organists, whose ranks she joined in the fall of 1991. If you see Meredith's name listed on a concert flyer in your vicinity, be sure to hear her play!   Your scribe, Pat Maimone Post Chapel, West Point, NY Oct 1975 - June 2003 patmai@juno.com     ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!  
(back) Subject: Re: Keith's and Lee's Wedding in NY with Felix Hell, organist From: "David Carter" <davidorganist2002@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 22:14:19 -0700 (PDT)   Sorry I'm so late in responding - getting caught up with 3 weeks worth of = organ emails. For groomsman and best man, I nominate Malcolm Wechsler and Bruce Cornely, in = no particular order.   David Carter --- Chicaleee@aol.com wrote: > Felix Hell confirmed this afternoon that he will play for Keith's and = Lee's > wedding at St. Luke's Lutheran Church, NYC, June 7, with the Rev. Alan = Freed > officiating. This was a wonderful and delightful surprise to us both. = My > daughter lives in NY and her family will be participating in the = ceremony. > Keith still needs a best man and groomsman. Any suggestions? Lee >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo. http://search.yahoo.com