PipeChat Digest #3680 - Sunday, May 18, 2003
 
Acoustics and Music
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: New 5 manual pipe organ
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
ADMIN: Re: Electronic Organ Makers PLEASE READ
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: Grand, Grande, and World-Class
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Side Saddle Explanation
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Side Saddle Explanation
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Side Saddle Explanation
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Reedless Oboe
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
RE: New 5 manual pipe organ
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
imports, exports, and orphans
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Grand, Grande, and World-Class
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Emmanuel Church, Boston
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Test (which side of the road?)
  by "Ian Robison" <patian@senet.com.au>
Re: New 5 manual pipe organ
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Acoustics and Music From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 10:32:31 EDT   Instrumental and vocal groups of all sizes have played at all volumes and tempi in all kinds of acoustics for centuries, without the "benefits" of being distorted through amplifiers and speaker cones. To this day, the = choir of Saint John's College, Cambridge, appear NOT to wear lapel microphones.  
(back) Subject: Re: New 5 manual pipe organ From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 09:35:58 -0500   Alan Freed wrote: > I find it AMAZING that there could be three such instruments in one > city   I just find it sad that the work went overseas, given the current "clime" amongst the Pipe Organ Industry today. More builders are hurting than would care to admit it, given the economic downturn. Wasn't anyone capable of doing the work in the US? I recently spoke with one of the major vendors and he told me things are pretty grim.   What's done is done in this particular situation, of course, but it seems remarkably similar to the "corporate games" played these days whereby all manufacturing is sent offshore to Third World countries where manufacturing costs are virtually nonexistent by comparison to the US. Meanwhile, workers in our country are laid off by the tens of thousands. Who's going to be left with any money to buy anything here if this trend continues?   Just a thought.   Faithfully,   G.A. -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS    
(back) Subject: ADMIN: Re: Electronic Organ Makers PLEASE READ From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 11:56:01 -0500   At 12:10 AM 5/18/2003 -0500, Richard wrote: >How about: Let's not? At least: no here! How about >conducting that vote on E-Org, rather than Pipechat? I'm not >speaking for the List Owners by any means, but such a thing >could easily become divisive and lead to the usual "war >games". I think our Fearless Leaders will agree with me in >this.   Dear Pipechatters,   Well, this "fearless leader" [Richard's term, not mine! <g>] would indeed tend to agree...this poll would probably be much more appropriate for = EORG-L.   SOOO..., if we're going to continue the thread here at Pipechat, may I please request that we all at least "PLAY NICE"....?!! <big smile>   Thank you all very much, and now, back to our normally scheduled Sunday afternoon programming...!   Tim Bovard Pipechat Co-Admin <admin@pipechat.org>              
(back) Subject: Re: Grand, Grande, and World-Class From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 13:51:04 EDT     --part1_122.2278993e.2bf92208_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/18/2003 10:29:27 AM Eastern Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:     > Can anybody explain to a beginner organbuilder the distinction between a =   > "Grand" organ, a "Grande" organ, and a "World-Class" organ? I see these > terms > used so frequently, and I am afraid that the little six-rank pipe organ > we're > building now might be a "Less-than-Grande Martian Class organ." > >   FWIW, the difference between the use of superlatives to describe such an organ are strictly in the "eye" of the beholder. a little 6-ranker, to = it's proud owner could be as much a "world class" organ as Riverside's AE-S behemoth is to those who revere the American-Classic style of organbuilding....as a 20-or-so stop Taylor and Boody would be to someone = who wants a tracker-action organ to a Baroque design principles.   Rick in VA   --part1_122.2278993e.2bf92208_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>In a message dated = 5/18/2=3D 003 10:29:27 AM Eastern Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Can anybody explain to a = be=3D ginner organbuilder the distinction between a=3D20 <BR>"Grand" organ, a "Grande" organ, and a "World-Class" organ? I see = these=3D20=3D terms=3D20 <BR>used so frequently, and I am afraid that the little six-rank pipe = organ=3D20=3D we're=3D20 <BR>building now might be a "Less-than-Grande Martian Class organ." <BR> <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR>FWIW, the difference between the use of superlatives to describe such = an=3D organ are strictly in the "eye" of the beholder. a little 6-ranker, to = it's=3D proud owner could be as much a "world class" organ as Riverside's AE-S = behe=3D moth is to those who revere the American-Classic style of = organbuilding....a=3D s a 20-or-so stop Taylor and Boody would be to someone who wants a = tracker-a=3D ction organ to a Baroque design principles. <BR> <BR>Rick in VA</FONT></HTML>   --part1_122.2278993e.2bf92208_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Side Saddle Explanation From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 14:34:15 EDT     --part1_117.23a95629.2bf92c27_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   Can somebody explain to me (1) the definition of and (2) the mechanics = behind the "side saddle" arrangement of a tracker organ.   I've seen a few examples of tracker organs in which the keydesk is on the "end" of the case instead of the back or front. I'm trying to figure out = how this works mechanically.   In contradistinction, I've tried to "back into" an understanding of this = by understanding what it is not. For example, a description of one of the organs listed on Organ Clearninghouse (organ #2034) implies that this = organ gives the illusion of being a side-saddle arrangement, but is not. Apparently, the organ is considerably deeper than it is wide and gives the =   "illusion" of having the keydesk on the end.   1. Is a side-saddle arrangement truly one in which keydesk is oriented towards one "end" of the windchest as opposed to either the front or back?   2. If the above is true, how is this "turn" of trackers effected? In = most tracker organs, the line of keys and that of the pallets form two almost parallel lines. In the simplest case of a chromatic chest, there's a line =   drawn (in the form of trackers, backfalls, stickers. and pull-downs) = between each key and its pallet. In more complicated chest layouts (diatonic, = major third, etc.) roller boards are used, but the effect remains to connect = each key in its line to a pallet of a parallel line.   3. If my understanding of side-saddle is true, then this row of keys = forms its line, but the line of pallets runs perpendicular to the key line - = like a T or L. It's conceivable that each tracker run could include a right = angle turn to the left or right (whichever is the case) to reach its pallet.   4. Or . . . does side-saddle simply mean that the organ is turned = sideways to the room? A 3 manual tracker organ with sizeable divisions could end = up being quite deep if it's manual divisions were one in front of the other. =   Therefore, the organ might be turned sideways to the room having its swell =   shades on the "end" of each swell box instead of the front. IOW, the organist x-ray vision might see Great, Choir, Swell lined up behind each other, the audience might see Great, Choir, Swell arranged from left to right. With shades open, the audience might be looking directly at the treble end of each division. I don't think that this is what is meant by "side saddle" arrangement.   Thanks for your explanations, Keith Zimmerman Commerce, Georgia   --part1_117.23a95629.2bf92c27_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> Can somebody explain to me (1) the definition of and (2) the mechanics = behin=3D d the "side saddle" arrangement of a tracker organ.<BR> <BR> I've seen a few examples of tracker organs in which the keydesk is on the = "e=3D nd" of the case instead of the back or front.&nbsp; I'm trying to figure = out=3D how this works mechanically.<BR> <BR> In contradistinction, I've tried to "back into" an understanding of this = by=3D20=3D understanding what it is not.&nbsp; For example, a description of one of = the=3D organs listed on Organ Clearninghouse (organ #2034) implies that this = organ=3D gives the illusion of being a side-saddle arrangement, but is not. = Apparent=3D ly, the organ is considerably deeper than it is wide and gives the = "illusion=3D " of having the keydesk on the end.<BR> <BR> 1.&nbsp; Is a side-saddle arrangement truly one in which keydesk is = oriented=3D towards one "end" of the windchest as opposed to either the front or = back?<=3D BR> <BR> 2.&nbsp; If the above is true, how is this "turn" of trackers = effected?&nbsp=3D ; In most tracker organs, the line of keys and that of the pallets form = two=3D20=3D almost parallel lines.&nbsp; In the simplest case of a chromatic chest, = ther=3D e's a line drawn (in the form of trackers, backfalls, stickers. and pull-dow=3D ns) between each key and its pallet.&nbsp; In more complicated chest = layouts=3D (diatonic, major third, etc.) roller boards are used, but the effect = remain=3D s to connect each key in its line to a pallet of a parallel line.<BR> <BR> 3.&nbsp; If my understanding of side-saddle is true, then this row of keys = f=3D orms its line, but the line of pallets runs perpendicular to the key line = -=3D20=3D like a T or L.&nbsp;&nbsp; It's conceivable that each tracker run could = incl=3D ude a right angle turn to the left or right (whichever is the case) to = reach=3D its pallet.<BR> <BR> 4.&nbsp; Or . . . does side-saddle simply mean that the organ is turned = side=3D ways to the room?&nbsp; A 3 manual tracker organ with sizeable divisions = cou=3D ld end up being quite deep if it's manual divisions were one in front of = the=3D other.&nbsp; Therefore, the organ might be turned sideways to the room = havi=3D ng its swell shades on the "end" of each swell box instead of the = front.&nbs=3D p; IOW, the organist x-ray vision might see Great, Choir, Swell lined up = beh=3D ind each other, the audience might see Great, Choir, Swell arranged from = lef=3D t to right.&nbsp; With shades open, the audience might be looking directly = a=3D t the treble end of each division.&nbsp; I don't think that this is what = is=3D20=3D meant by "side saddle" arrangement.<BR> <BR> Thanks for your explanations,<BR> Keith Zimmerman<BR> Commerce, Georgia</FONT></HTML>   --part1_117.23a95629.2bf92c27_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Side Saddle Explanation From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 14:36:18 EDT     --part1_1d9.9e4cd4d.2bf92ca2_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   Can somebody explain to me (1) the definition of and (2) the mechanics = behind the "side saddle" arrangement of a tracker organ.   I've seen a few examples of tracker organs in which the keydesk is on the "end" of the case instead of the back or front. I'm trying to figure out = how this works mechanically.   In contradistinction, I've tried to "back into" an understanding of this = by understanding what it is not. For example, a description of one of the organs listed on Organ Clearninghouse (organ #2034) implies that this = organ gives the illusion of being a side-saddle arrangement, but is not. Apparently, the organ is considerably deeper than it is wide and gives the =   "illusion" of having the keydesk on the end.   1. Is a side-saddle arrangement truly one in which keydesk is oriented towards one "end" of the windchest as opposed to either the front or back?   2. If the above is true, how is this "turn" of trackers effected? In = most tracker organs, the line of keys and that of the pallets form two almost parallel lines. In the simplest case of a chromatic chest, there's a line =   drawn (in the form of trackers, backfalls, stickers. and pull-downs) = between each key and its pallet. In more complicated chest layouts (diatonic, = major third, etc.) roller boards are used, but the effect remains to connect = each key in its line to a pallet of a parallel line.   3. If my understanding of side-saddle is true, then this row of keys = forms its line, but the line of pallets runs perpendicular to the key line - = like a T or L. It's conceivable that each tracker run could include a right = angle turn to the left or right (whichever is the case) to reach its pallet.   4. Or . . . does side-saddle simply mean that the organ is turned = sideways to the room? A 3 manual tracker organ with sizeable divisions could end = up being quite deep if it's manual divisions were one in front of the other. =   Therefore, the organ might be turned sideways to the room having its swell =   shades on the "end" of each swell box instead of the front. IOW, the organist x-ray vision might see Great, Choir, Swell lined up behind each other, the audience might see Great, Choir, Swell arranged from left to right. With shades open, the audience might be looking directly at the treble end of each division. I don't think that this is what is meant by "side saddle" arrangement.   Thanks for your explanations, Keith Zimmerman Commerce, Georgia   --part1_1d9.9e4cd4d.2bf92ca2_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> Can somebody explain to me (1) the definition of and (2) the mechanics = behin=3D d the "side saddle" arrangement of a tracker organ.<BR> <BR> I've seen a few examples of tracker organs in which the keydesk is on the = "e=3D nd" of the case instead of the back or front.&nbsp; I'm trying to figure = out=3D how this works mechanically.<BR> <BR> In contradistinction, I've tried to "back into" an understanding of this = by=3D20=3D understanding what it is not.&nbsp; For example, a description of one of = the=3D organs listed on Organ Clearninghouse (organ #2034) implies that this = organ=3D gives the illusion of being a side-saddle arrangement, but is not. = Apparent=3D ly, the organ is considerably deeper than it is wide and gives the = "illusion=3D " of having the keydesk on the end.<BR> <BR> 1.&nbsp; Is a side-saddle arrangement truly one in which keydesk is = oriented=3D towards one "end" of the windchest as opposed to either the front or = back?<=3D BR> <BR> 2.&nbsp; If the above is true, how is this "turn" of trackers = effected?&nbsp=3D ; In most tracker organs, the line of keys and that of the pallets form = two=3D20=3D almost parallel lines.&nbsp; In the simplest case of a chromatic chest, = ther=3D e's a line drawn (in the form of trackers, backfalls, stickers. and pull-dow=3D ns) between each key and its pallet.&nbsp; In more complicated chest = layouts=3D (diatonic, major third, etc.) roller boards are used, but the effect = remain=3D s to connect each key in its line to a pallet of a parallel line.<BR> <BR> 3.&nbsp; If my understanding of side-saddle is true, then this row of keys = f=3D orms its line, but the line of pallets runs perpendicular to the key line = -=3D20=3D like a T or L.&nbsp;&nbsp; It's conceivable that each tracker run could = incl=3D ude a right angle turn to the left or right (whichever is the case) to = reach=3D its pallet.<BR> <BR> 4.&nbsp; Or . . . does side-saddle simply mean that the organ is turned = side=3D ways to the room?&nbsp; A 3 manual tracker organ with sizeable divisions = cou=3D ld end up being quite deep if it's manual divisions were one in front of = the=3D other.&nbsp; Therefore, the organ might be turned sideways to the room = havi=3D ng its swell shades on the "end" of each swell box instead of the = front.&nbs=3D p; IOW, the organist x-ray vision might see Great, Choir, Swell lined up = beh=3D ind each other, the audience might see Great, Choir, Swell arranged from = lef=3D t to right.&nbsp; With shades open, the audience might be looking directly = a=3D t the treble end of each division.&nbsp; I don't think that this is what = is=3D20=3D meant by "side saddle" arrangement.<BR> <BR> Thanks for your explanations,<BR> Keith Zimmerman<BR> Commerce, Georgia</FONT></HTML>   --part1_1d9.9e4cd4d.2bf92ca2_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Side Saddle Explanation From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 14:46:43 EDT   Because all notes of the same pitch are on a common wind channel in a slider-and-pallet soundboard, the tracker runs can be key-scale in a side-saddle arrangement, and the pallets can be located practically = anywhere over the length of the channel, if one is willing to measure all of the individual blocking. Therefore, from beneath, one sees that the pallets run in a diagonal sweep from end to end on the windchest, and the trackers do not have to = take any additional turns, except for the action squares which transfer motion from vertical to horizontal. It is best to see one of these in the flesh (or in the wood) under the =   guidance of an organbuilder or curator, although there are admittedly more =   such beasts in Europe than the USA. Some recent American mechanical action =   organs with "dog-house" style Swells with basses at the back running chromatically to trebles at the front have a similar arrangement of = pallets. A search of the internet might very well turn up a detailed = photograph.   Sebastian M. Gluck Tonal Director, Gluck New York, Inc. Editor, the Journal of American Organbuilding  
(back) Subject: Reedless Oboe From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 13:48:33 -0500   HI group, I am donating an 8' reedless Oboe to the Estey Organ Co. museum = of Brattleboro, Vt. The pipes were manufactured there in 1906 and would be a great addition to have for use in their project. Good luck to those who = are working on this worthwhile project. Gary      
(back) Subject: RE: New 5 manual pipe organ From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 15:12:47 -0400   Richard: This may make you feel a bit better. The Canadian $ has risen to USD.73 cents from about 61 cents over a 3 month period. The Euro is worth about 1.14 USD. I import all my pipes and some chests and have always = dealt with Europe. Not now. Guess where I and I expect others will now be buying their organ parts from? I 'll wager Europeans might be buying organs and parts from the US if the trend continues. There are some good things about having a relatively weak currency. I can guarantee you the organ builders/exporters in Canada are not pleased with the recent developments.   Regards AjM     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Richard Schneider Sent: Sunday, May 18, 2003 10:36 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: New 5 manual pipe organ     I just find it sad that the work went overseas, given the current "clime" amongst the Pipe Organ Industry today. More builders are hurting than would care to admit it, given the economic downturn. Wasn't anyone capable of doing the work in the US? I recently spoke with one of the major vendors and he told me things are pretty grim.   What's done is done in this particular situation, of course, but it seems remarkably similar to the "corporate games" played these days whereby all manufacturing is sent offshore to Third World countries where manufacturing costs are virtually nonexistent by comparison to the US. Meanwhile, workers in our country are laid off by the tens of thousands. Who's going to be left with any money to buy anything here if this trend continues?   Just a thought.   Faithfully,        
(back) Subject: imports, exports, and orphans From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 12:27:03 -0700   Sadder still is the fact that I can think of several MASSIVE four or five manual American organs that could have been had ... not cheaply ... museum-quality restorations of large electro-pneumatic organs aren't cheap ... but certainly for less ... and they contain materials, workmanship and voicing of a quality that is seldom seen today ... they were the equal of anything that was being built in Erope at the time .... a truly priceless part of the BEST in romantic American = organ-building.   We'll all wring our hands when they're sold for scrap and the pipes are melted down. But they COULD have been saved.   Bud, still dreaming of hearing Mr. Farnam's Masterpiece play again (grin)      
(back) Subject: Re: Grand, Grande, and World-Class From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 22:23:33 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   I think Sebastian is winding us up a little, but at least we are back talking of pipe organs!   "Pour grande orgue" tends to suggest a big, symphonic style of instrument in my understanding. They don't come any more "grande" than Cavaille-Coll.   Of course, the word "Grand" is rather more complex; being a subtle word with numerous meanings. The Irish always reply, when asked about their health, "I'm grand", even though they are small, thin people by and large (or small).   Here in England, anything at all may be considered "grand", as in:-   "That's a grand coat"   "That's a grand cup"   "What a grand wedding ring"   etc etc   Larger items can be:-   "What a grand meal"   "What a grand shed"   "What a grand piano"   "What a grand organ"   This should not be confused with:-   Grandchildren Grandparents   However, children are often described as "Grand little mites"......a bit of a contradiction.   Then there are metaphysical things such as "Grand plan" or even apocalyptic events such as a "Grand storm". The there are "grand days", which are not at all stormy.   Locally, we have organs with "Grand Trumpets"; usually by Hill, Norman & Beard Ltd. Indeed, they ARE very grand indeed, having the Rundle name behind the voicing thereof.   Now, "World Class" is something else, which the discerning mind understands. I would describe a "world class" organ as something outstanding OF ITS TYPE. It could be Alkmaar, Haarlem, St J-the-D in New York, Salisbury Cathedral in the UK or just a tonal masterpiece like Blackburn Cathedral here in the UK.   Sadly, people hear small organs in unfavourable acoustics, and cannot discern the "world class" quality behind the voicers/designers struggle to create a musical instrument.   If I describe something as "world class", it would be from the perspective of "understanding". I can recognise a brilliant instrument even in a poor acoustic.   Unfortunately, people often confuse mediocre instruments in favourable acoustics as "world class", when in point of fact, the organ-builder's art is merely flattered by the building.   So perhaps we should all strive towards "world class" in everything we do, but God knows, few, if any, will ever be up there with the best in the field.   Of one thing I am sure, Sebastian's writing is most definitely "WORLD CLASS".   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Can anybody explain to a beginner organbuilder the > distinction between a > "Grand" organ, a "Grande" organ, and a "World-Class" > organ? I see these terms > used so frequently, and I am afraid that the little > six-rank pipe organ we're > building now might be a "Less-than-Grande Martian > Class organ."     __________________________________________________ Yahoo! Plus For a better Internet experience http://www.yahoo.co.uk/btoffer  
(back) Subject: Emmanuel Church, Boston From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 14:31:15 -0700   Speaking of Mr. Farnham's Masterpiece, is there anyone on these lists who is old enough to have HEARD it? It's been derelict ever since *I* can remember.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Test (which side of the road?) From: "Ian Robison" <patian@senet.com.au> Date: Mon, 19 May 2003 07:24:08 +0930   Thanks Bob.   Looks as if we are in a minority group in Australia as far as which side of the road we drive on!   The Web site you suggested is fascinating. I have given it a brief look at 7.20 a.m. on a Monday morning! Will spend more time on it later.   Best regards,   Ian.   On Sunday, May 18, 2003, at 01:33 PM, Robert P. Bass wrote:   > Howdy Ian, > > In PipeChat Digest #3676 - 05/16/03 you wrote: > >> The Castle Singers and Band are presently on tour in Australia. >> >> They are still anxious about road traffic coming at them on the >> "wrong side of the road"! >> >> Why do you drive on the "right" side of the road in America, >> anyway? Any answers would be appreciated. >> >> Ian. > > Here's a site that may help explain why.... > > http://www.travel-library.com/general/driving/drive_which_side.html > > Interesting to see how much of the world uses the "Right" side. ;)) > HTH > > > Best Regards, > Bob > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: New 5 manual pipe organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 18 May 2003 17:02:24 -0500   Andrew Mead wrote:   >Richard: This may make you feel a bit better. The Canadian $ has risen to >USD.73 cents from about 61 cents over a 3 month period. The Euro is worth >about 1.14 USD. > That is an interesting thought. The Euro was up to 1.16 last week. Unless they have been very clever in the way they have drawn up the contract, this means, I imagine, that the church in Charlotte is going to have to pay about 14% more for their five manual organ than they thought they would, and may end up paying much more than that if the value of the dollar continues to fall. One would think that an instrument of this size would cost of the order of $2 million or more, so they are probably already going to have to fork out an extra $300,000 or so.   John Speller