PipeChat Digest #3694 - Friday, May 23, 2003
 
poets corner
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Limerivk alert
  by "Shelley Culver" <sec_oboe2002@excite.com>
Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net>
Re: Limerivk alert
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Limerick alert
  by "Eric McKirdy" <eric@jazzyeric.com>
RE: Bach for church
  by <Markhedm@cs.com>
Re: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Spring cleaning
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com>
RE: Bach for church
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Bach for church
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Bach for church
  by <Pepehomer@aol.com>
Re: Bach for church
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen
  by "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net>
Re: Limerick
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
RE: Futurama part 2
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
RE: Tuning knife trouble
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Just a Reminder...
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
 

(back) Subject: poets corner From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 14:05:41 +0100 (BST)   OK....you wanted a limerick:-     There was man who read pipechat, who complained that the scan was not true,   To avenge his distaste, he posted with haste,   leaving cmys in the blue.   --- Austin David <david.austin@kone.com> wrote: > I always thought that limericks have 5 lines.     __________________________________________________ It's Samaritans' Week. Help Samaritans help others. Call 08709 000032 to give or donate online now at = http://www.samaritans.org/support/donations.shtm  
(back) Subject: Re: Limerivk alert From: "Shelley Culver" <sec_oboe2002@excite.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 11:05:24 -0400 (EDT)     >I always thought that limericks have 5 lines.   Yes, they do. The 1st, 2nd, and last lines rhyme. The 3rd and 4th = rhyme. Maybe one of you more poety types can provide an example. I'm fresh = out of limericks this morning!   Shelley           --- On Fri 05/23, Austin David < david.austin@kone.com > wrote: From: Austin David [mailto: david.austin@kone.com] To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 09:03:19 +0200 Subject: Re: Limerivk alert   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1"> <META NAME=3D"Generator" CONTENT=3D"MS Exchange Server version = 5.5.2653.12"> <TITLE>Re: Limerivk alert</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>I always thought that limericks have 5 lines.</FONT> </P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>>Seated one day at the piano,</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>I looked between my knees,</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>My feet began to wander,</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>looking for bits of trees.</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>></FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>I knew not what I was doing,</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>three pedals seemed not a lot.</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>I tried a chord with both my feet,</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2>>but no amen I got.</FONT> </P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D2>Colin Mitchell</FONT> </P>   </BODY> </HTML><p>   _______________________________________________ Join Excite! - http://www.excite.com The most personalized portal on the Web!  
(back) Subject: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen From: "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 08:17:15 -0700 (PDT)   Yesterday, on a spur of the moment I headed to Holy Cross in the city and made some impromtu recordings w/ my minidisc recorder. I went without shoes and music, so grabbed a hymnal and just played for a couple hours. Most of what I did was on a meditative level, was a way to relax a bit. So if you'd like to hear this wonderful instrument. Go to:   briefcase.yahoo.com/tlevans@sbcglobal.net   they will be located under the "Holy Cross Lutheran St. Louis City"   There are a couple that were pieces I sight read that were laying on the organ (Track 1 and Track 2).   Hope you enjoy.   Travis  
(back) Subject: Re: Limerivk alert From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 11:21:05 -0400   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ----__JNP_000_302d.2327.02bc Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     On Fri, 23 May 2003 11:05:24 -0400 (EDT) "Shelley Culver" <sec_oboe2002@excite.com> writes: > > >I always thought that limericks have 5 lines. > > Yes, they do. The 1st, 2nd, and last lines rhyme. The 3rd and 4th > rhyme. Maybe one of you more poetry types can provide an example. I'm > fresh out of limericks this morning! > > Shelley     Be careful! You had better refer to them as: poems consisting of five anapestic lines with a rhyme scheme aabba. Limericks are just one example of this form.   I have an Irish book on Limericks, published in the 19th century. It bears a note on the title page to wit:   "People generally assume that a limerick describes any work of that form so familiar to many. If this were the case, there would be well over 80,000 known limericks, bawdy and otherwise. This is a book of TRUE limericks. None are otherwise."       Jim ----__JNP_000_302d.2327.02bc Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3Dcontent-type = content=3D3Dtext/html;charset=3D3Dus-ascii> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1170" name=3D3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY bottomMargin=3D3D0 leftMargin=3D3D3 topMargin=3D3D0 = rightMargin=3D3D3> <DIV></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>On Fri, 23 May 2003 11:05:24 -0400 (EDT) "Shelley Culver" &lt;<A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:sec_oboe2002@excite.com">sec_oboe2002@excite.com</A>&gt;= =3D20 writes:<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; &gt;I always thought that limericks have 5 = lines.=3D =3D20 <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Yes, they do. The 1st, 2nd, and last = =3D lines=3D20 rhyme. The 3rd and 4th <BR>&gt; rhyme. Maybe one of you more poetry types = =3D can=3D20 provide an example. I'm <BR>&gt; fresh out of limericks this = morning!<BR>&=3D gt;=3D20 <BR>&gt; Shelley<BR></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Be careful!&nbsp; You had better refer to them as:&nbsp; poems =3D consisting=3D20 of&nbsp;five anapestic lines with&nbsp;a&nbsp;rhyme scheme = <I>aabba.</I></=3D DIV> <DIV><EM>Limericks </EM>are just one example&nbsp;of this form.</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I have an Irish book on Limericks, published in the 19th = century.&nbsp=3D ; It=3D20 bears a note on the title page to wit:</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>"People generally assume that a limerick describes any work of that = =3D form so=3D20 familiar to many. If this were the case, there would be well over 80,000 = =3D known=3D20 limericks, bawdy and otherwise.&nbsp; This is a book of TRUE = limericks.&=3D nbsp;=3D20 None are otherwise."</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>Jim</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ----__JNP_000_302d.2327.02bc--    
(back) Subject: Re: Limerick alert From: "Eric McKirdy" <eric@jazzyeric.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 09:00:22 -0700   Once, a young org'nist from Shedd Left dial-up for high-speed, instead He laughed at the cost And all was not lost "I love you much more," his wife said   ------------   (Just a little dedication to the fact that yesterday we eschewed the bonds of dial-up, and have an up-and-running high-speed wireless network at = home!)   Happy Memorial Day Weekend, Eric    
(back) Subject: RE: Bach for church From: <Markhedm@cs.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 12:05:50 EDT     --part1_103.2eb49b12.2bffa0de_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   What are your favorite Bach pieces suitable for a church service?   I would like to learn a larger Bach work that I could learn over the summer, when I have more time, like a prelude and fugue that is suitable for playing during a church service, and that would be appreciated by the listeners (assuming they will stop talking!) . I have played the Cathedral Prelude and Fugue in E minor, and two of the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues, but haven't played them in church for a while. I am looking for something more challenging that it is short enough to fit in a church service. I like the Prelude and Fugue in C (BWV 545). I have been working on the Fantasia in G, and am able to play it, but it seems too long for a postlude. If one could choose just one large Bach piece for church service playing, what would it be?   Here is a list of Bach that I regularly play. Pastorale in F Major (1st mvt) Adagio from the Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C Savior of the Nations, Come (Nun komm der Heiden Heiland)( for Advent) Wachet Auf ( for Advent) O sacred head, now wounded ( Lent) Blessed Jesu, at thy word ( Liebster Jesu)   from the Orgelbuchlein When in the Hour of Utmost Need Lord Jesus Christ, Be Present Now The Old year Now Hath Passed Away ( I don't play this one anymore. I love it, but it is quite chromatic, and doesn't seem to fit the New Year, Christmastide, or the last day in the church year). Lamb of God, Our Savior O Man, Bewail, Thy Mortal Sin ( for Lent) I Call to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ ( for Lent)   transcriptions Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Sheep May Safely Graze Arioso Air in D (Air on a G string) When Thou art Near ( Du bist bei mir)     Mark H.   --part1_103.2eb49b12.2bffa0de_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">What are your favorite Bach pieces suitable for = a chur=3D ch service? <BR> <BR> I would like to learn a larger Bach work that I could learn over the<BR> summer, when I have<BR> more time, like a prelude and fugue that is suitable for playing<BR> during a church service,<BR> and that would be appreciated by the listeners (assuming they will<BR> stop talking!) . I have<BR> played the Cathedral Prelude and Fugue in E minor, and two of the<BR> Eight Little Preludes<BR> and Fugues, but haven't played them in church for a while. I am<BR> looking for something<BR> more challenging that it is short enough to fit in a church service. I<BR> like the Prelude and<BR> Fugue in C (BWV 545). I have been working on the Fantasia in G, and<BR> am able to play it, but it seems too long<BR> for a postlude. If one could choose just one large Bach piece for<BR> church service playing, what would it be? <BR> <BR> Here is a list of Bach that I regularly play.<BR> Pastorale in F Major (1st mvt) <BR> Adagio from the Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C<BR> Savior of the Nations, Come (Nun komm der Heiden Heiland)( for<BR> Advent) <BR> Wachet Auf ( for Advent) <BR> O sacred head, now wounded ( Lent) <BR> Blessed Jesu, at thy word ( Liebster Jesu) <BR> <BR> from the Orgelbuchlein<BR> When in the Hour of Utmost Need<BR> Lord Jesus Christ, Be Present Now<BR> The Old year Now Hath Passed Away ( I don't play this one anymore. I<BR> love it, but it is<BR> quite chromatic, and doesn't seem to fit the New Year, Christmastide,<BR> or the last day in<BR> the church year). <BR> Lamb of God, Our Savior<BR> O Man, Bewail, Thy Mortal Sin ( for Lent) <BR> I Call to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ ( for Lent) <BR> <BR> transcriptions<BR> Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring<BR> Sheep May Safely Graze<BR> Arioso<BR> Air in D (Air on a G string) <BR> When Thou art Near ( Du bist bei mir) <BR> <BR> <BR> Mark H. <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_103.2eb49b12.2bffa0de_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 12:29:08 -0400   Travis told us that he had recorded some organ music, which I have now heard, and I like the pieces that he plays.   However, I only recognized a couple of the tracks, and would like to know the complete play-list, can you let us know what all the pieces are?   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Spring cleaning From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@classicorgan.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 12:29:24 -0400   Hi list,   We are in the Toronto area, and are doing some spring cleaning. We have the following for a real good price, if anybody is interested.   1) Casavant 32 note pedalklavier. Built around 1964. Shows wear but in good condition. $200 2) Hallman 32 note pedalklavier with multi contact switches - good condition -$100 3) pipe organ wind resovoir - quite small ( 24" X 24" ) good condition - $150     All figures in the "powerful" Canadian dollars. Shipping if needed extra.   Regards,   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: RE: Bach for church From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 18:25:23 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Without doubt the Allabreve.   It is not very difficult, but sounds glorious with almost any level registration, whether loud or soft.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     ---   Markhedm@cs.com wrote:   > What are your favorite Bach pieces suitable for a > church service?     __________________________________________________ It's Samaritans' Week. Help Samaritans help others. Call 08709 000032 to give or donate online now at = http://www.samaritans.org/support/donations.shtm  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach for church From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 10:41:05 -0700   Mark, I think the bigger chorale preludes are more useful for church than most of the preludes and fugues, simply because of length. I have a tight Mass schedule that doesn't allow for more than a 5-7 minute opening voluntary and a 3-5 minute closing voluntary.   LEIPZIG CHORALES (The "Great Eighteen")   Saviour of the Nations, Come 1, 2, 3, - the alternative version of (2) in the appendix is MUCH easier to play (grin), and to me sounds less = muddy.   O Lamb of God, All-Holy - I play the chorale in the alto part in the pedals on a 4' stop in the second verse ... there's one phrase that requires some work   Deck Thyself, My Soul, With Gladness   A Lamb Bears All Our Guilt Away (By the Waters of Babylon)   Come God, Creator, Holy Ghost (adds a second verse to the Orgelbuechlein version)   Before Thy Throne   CLAVIERUEBUNG III   People often overlook the "small" versions for manuals alone ... they aren't necessarily EASY, but they're a good length.   Small Kyries 1, 2, 3 - it's no sin to use the pedal coupler (only) to help out the left hand with the reaches (grin)   The three large Kyries are a treasure ... I usually play all three on Trinity Sunday ... 1 for the opening voluntary, 2 during communion, and 3 for the closing voluntary   NONE of the settings of All GLory Be To God On High are EASY (grin), but the manualiter one is manageable   These Are The Ten Holy Commands is a STRANGE piece (large version), but quite lovely; the small version is charming played on a Positiv plenum with a 16' Dulzian.   The large fugue on We All Believe In One True God is justly famous.   The double-pedal Out of the Depths isn't as hard as it looks, if the left foot is played with a heavy marcato (rather than attempting to play it legato) so that the melody in the right foot stands out.   The small Our Father Who In Heaven Art is charming when played on just a singing 4' flute, possibly with tremulant   Christ our Lord To Jordan Came appears every year on the Baptism of Christ ... both versions are good ... I usually play the big one at the beginning of Mass, and the fugue at the end.   Some other big works that aren't played too often are the Fugue on the Magnificat, the double-pedal We All Believe In One True God (probably by Krebs, but it's a good piece) and Lord Jesus Christ, Be Present Now in the misc. chorale preludes.   You might "work up" to these by playing some of the baroque chorale-preludes in The Church Organist's Golden Treasury (3 vols.)   Cheers,   Bud           Markhedm@cs.com wrote: > What are your favorite Bach pieces suitable for a church service? > > I would like to learn a larger Bach work that I could learn over the > summer, when I have > more time, like a prelude and fugue that is suitable for playing > during a church service, > and that would be appreciated by the listeners (assuming they will > stop talking!) . I have > played the Cathedral Prelude and Fugue in E minor, and two of the > Eight Little Preludes > and Fugues, but haven't played them in church for a while. I am > looking for something > more challenging that it is short enough to fit in a church service. I > like the Prelude and > Fugue in C (BWV 545). I have been working on the Fantasia in G, and > am able to play it, but it seems too long > for a postlude. If one could choose just one large Bach piece for > church service playing, what would it be? > > Here is a list of Bach that I regularly play. > Pastorale in F Major (1st mvt) > Adagio from the Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C > Savior of the Nations, Come (Nun komm der Heiden Heiland)( for > Advent) > Wachet Auf ( for Advent) > O sacred head, now wounded ( Lent) > Blessed Jesu, at thy word ( Liebster Jesu) > > from the Orgelbuchlein > When in the Hour of Utmost Need > Lord Jesus Christ, Be Present Now > The Old year Now Hath Passed Away ( I don't play this one anymore. I > love it, but it is > quite chromatic, and doesn't seem to fit the New Year, Christmastide, > or the last day in > the church year). > Lamb of God, Our Savior > O Man, Bewail, Thy Mortal Sin ( for Lent) > I Call to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ ( for Lent) > > transcriptions > Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring > Sheep May Safely Graze > Arioso > Air in D (Air on a G string) > When Thou art Near ( Du bist bei mir) > > > Mark H.        
(back) Subject: Re: Bach for church From: <Pepehomer@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 13:49:17 -0400   Well, this isn't nearly as detailed as some of the other responses, but my = first thought was "Now Thank We All Our God" by Bach and arranged by Fox. = I actually get requests for it. Not too difficult by any means, but very = "crowd pleasing".   Justin Karch Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS Rome, GA  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach for church From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 10:59:55 -0700   Hmmm ... the arrangement in the St. Cecelia Thanksgiving Music collection is easier to play (chuckle).   And I forgot the Canzona in Vol. 2 of the Widor-Schweitzer. Somebody mentioned the Allebreve; that made me think of it.   Cheers,   Bud   Pepehomer@aol.com wrote: > Well, this isn't nearly as detailed as some of the other responses, but = my first thought was "Now Thank We All Our God" by Bach and arranged by = Fox. I actually get requests for it. Not too difficult by any means, but = very "crowd pleasing". > > Justin Karch > Organist, Holy Trinity LCMS > Rome, GA > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Cross Lutheran, St. Louis City, 1902 Kilgen From: "Travis L. Evans" <tevansmo@prodigy.net> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 11:10:45 -0700 (PDT)   The first three pieces were actuall published compositions, the names of which escape me now, as it wasn't my music jus that which was left on the organ that I sightread through. 4-10 are improvisations (and I use that loosely) on some hymn tunes. I just opened the hymn book and started flipping through. I'll try to get the names of the hymns up later.   Travis --- Bob Conway <conwayb@sympatico.ca> wrote: > Travis told us that he had recorded some organ > music, which I have now > heard, and I like the pieces that he plays. > > However, I only recognized a couple of the tracks, > and would like to know > the complete play-list, can you let us know what all > the pieces are? > > Bob Conway > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Limerick From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 19:07:05 +0000   The great thing about Limericks is that they must make absolutely no sense =   whatsoever. After this evening's bottle of Irish Whiskey washed down with = a flask of Nemea I offer you .........   There was a young lady from Kent Whose knees ended up slightly bent Her problem it seemed Was the way that she dreamed Of the email message she sent.   Her chords were remarkably neat For one with such nifty flat feet When she hit middle C She was bit by a bee Which improved her playing a treat.   Sorry, Colin!   JF under attack from the Gods of Olympus   www.johnfoss.gr   _________________________________________________________________ Add photos to your messages with MSN 8. Get 2 months FREE*. http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/featuredemail    
(back) Subject: RE: Futurama part 2 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 16:20:19 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Thanks Colin for some acclaratories in this interesting subject.   > So far as I am aware, the earliest swell boxes were > made in England. > To my worst shame I must confess that I am not so well acquaited with GB = and US organ history- precisely one of the reasons to join these lists was to know more. Of course, dear colleagues gave me terrific book lists- problem is to buy these treatises from Venezuela, which -at this very moment- is isolated financially from the rest of the world.   Big blabber, small question: *When* were these earliest swellboxes made?   > Sorry to be pedantic, but Andres seems to have > misplaced Mozart and Haydn, and they carry some weight > in the order of things you know!! I think substituted > the word Baroque when he really meant > Classical........ > Their "organ works" were written for barrel organs, never mind the = beautiful transcriptions we can enjoy today. The "classical" (Mannheimer) style, = which developed in Piano and Orchestra music didn't leave significant traces on organ music- as far as I could note. Beethoven kept the "Mannheimer = Stil" in his rather insignificant organ works. Next master I am aware who wrote organ works: Mendelssohn... rather Bach inspired :)- And Schumann already was Romantic... Now, again: For sure there were other masters- but what about their significance? Due to my gap in british organ music history I don't know if classicism was developed and a "missing link" lies in GB perhaps. I am grateful for any acclaratory in this...   > Playing early instruments, or neo-Baroque organs is > always a shock to those brought up with the > alternative.   Oh yes!- My father studied in Leipzig in the 1920s. Straube-Reger-Karl Hoyer tradition; although Orgelreform ideas began to come in most organs still were PN/EP. At wartime he became french prisoner. This saved his life- all his colleagues went to Russia and never came back. After war he lived in Paris 1945-47; but as a "sal boche" he hadn't contact with his colleagues, much less with french organs. Emmigrated to Venezuela in 1947. As a protestant = he was barred from our organs which are located in catholic churches- confessional division was though in that time. And the presbyterians only had a B3-wheelie. He played on his first Cavaille-Coll here in Caracas in 1974!- it was the San Jose organ. His comment: "Boy, where did they got *this* cudgel box from?"- to make justice, the C-C of San Jose is precisely the most uncomfortable and difficult to play of all our C-Cs: a heck of heavy = action; drawknobs everywhere due to the divided sliders.- Worse was my father's opinion however about the 1964 Kleuker in the german lutheran church: "What's *that* screamer?- Gosh, this thing doesn't even have a swellbox- how the heck can I achieve a nice crescendo!? at least = the Cavaille has a swellbox and a Vox Celeste!"   > Andres mentions the theatre organ.....(SNIP) Although > really an English invention in the first place,   Warning again: I am a newcomer in this particular field. Became interested due to David Kelzenberg's Article in other List. Here too I have to fill = out a big lagoon.   > In fact, you could probably write all the compositions > written for the theatre organ on the back of a postage > stamp, but at least I have composed ONE of them! (I > started a second but.......it's in the plastic bag).   It's never too late, and now I am talking serious. Efforts are made to = train TO. performers (quite different from "classic" techniques, I guess)- why = not encourage compositions taking advantage of the present rescue efforts?   > Now that pipes and digital > electronics can be made to co-exist on the same > instrument, there is a new opportunity for developing > new voices and new musical possibilities.   Digital instruments are barely out of the eggshell, historically seen. = They offer possibilities that aren't explored until yet. Problem *I* see at = this very moment: although it's technically possible, too many of us didn't got used ourselves to accept this coexistence in one instrument yet. A wound point. I myself still see two separated instrument families, hencefore I think about *compositions* for them rather in "modo concertante". I = promise however to think it over :)   yours Andres. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: RE: Tuning knife trouble From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 16:41:47 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   John Speller wrote:   > No, probably it is due to the fact that you were pointing it north when you > whacked it against the pipes. If anyone does not believe me that = hitting a > metal object while pointing it north causes it to become magnetized, = read > any elementary textbook on physics. So far as razor blades, pyramids, etc., > you would probably do better to consult a Ph.D. in psychology.   To this and other similar comments I received In List and privatedly:   *Please remember that we are in PipeChat* :)- I confess that I was kidding = a little here; perhaps I forgot a ':)' in my posting. I didn't intend to = fool anyone however.   Now serious: I live in a so called "third world country" where some = society thinking patterns are very, very different from "rationalized" country societies; and where people like abstract things. It isn't my intention to bring up a "culture crash" subject now. But many artisans here use very ancient methods and tricks that are almost forgotten in other latitudes. Some of them work- without possible explanation- it seems crazy but it's proven. Others however are sheer "numba pumba", that's right- the = moonshine thing among them... probably original knowledges that were corrupted by = oral tradition from generation to generation.   Cheers, and dropping the subject Andres; from a country of Sun, Palms and University Doctorates who still believe = in whichcraft :) =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Just a Reminder... From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2003 18:12:45 -0500   that the PipeChat IRC "chat" will be meeting in a couple of hours - beginning at 9:00 PM EASTERN time. If you need information on how to connect please go to the PipeChat IRC page at: http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   David