PipeChat Digest #3697 - Sunday, May 25, 2003
 
pedal-boards
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Organ settings of  Wunderbarer Koenig
  by <patmai@juno.com>
Tremont Temple
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Re: AGO/RCO pedals
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: 32 note pedal vs. 24 note pedal
  by "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net>
32 note pedal vs. 24 note pedal
  by <Wdh2@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: pedal-boards From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 24 May 2003 18:34:07 -0700   Over the years I have observed something, but I've never figured out the reason WHY: people who START on non - "standard" pedal-boards have no trouble adapting to AGO or other boards; people who DON'T do.   The chronology of "my" pedal-boards:   Estey - 27-note (I think) - flat, radiating Hammond Spinet - 12 notes Aeolian - 30-note - radiating, SLIGHTLY concave Allen - 25-note - flat, radiating - about the same as a Hammond Church = Model Allen - 32-note - "Princess" pedals - short sharps, concave, radiating Austin - 32-note - AGO   At that point, I went off to conservatory to study organ, only having had the use of an AGO pedal-board (the Austin) for ONE YEAR. Didn't faze = me.   The ONLY one that ever REALLY threw me was the historic little 1m Johnson organ in the UCC in National City, CA ... I think it had something like 18 pedals on a small, short, flat board ... CC to tenor F, maybe. I could NOT get the hang of that ... it didn't want to play like a spinet, yet it didn't want to play like a regular clavier either (chuckle).   Most of the 19th century organs around Cincinnati had flat, straight 27-note boards ... since I traveled around a lot with my choir in those days, I did quite a bit of playing on them. Some things were easier; others not.   Having and learning on an AGO standard is reasonable, as long as one doesn't intend to play recitals in Europe, or on historic organs in this country. Playing a couple of scales on a non-standard board seems to allow me to "shift gears" and I'm ready to go (grin).   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Organ settings of Wunderbarer Koenig From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 24 May 2003 22:15:13 -0400   Dear Karl,   Thanks very much to you and other Chatters who have written privately with organ settings of Wunderbarer Koenig/Arnsberg, which I have forwarded to my Hudson Valley colleague.   > Anton Leupold's collection (in English title) _An Organ Book_ , ed. Ulrich S. >Leupold, (Chantry Music Press, Fremont OH, 1960) has a fairly simple setting. The Q remains: Chantry has been sold .... to whom?   > Roberta Bitgood's "Chorale Prelude on 'God Himself Is Present'" (H. > W. Gray, St. Cecilia Series No. 793, 1953) is a "trio" in which the right > hand adds a simple fourth voice to fill in harmonies and the _cantus firmus_ is > in a 4' in the pedal. Harder than the Leupold setting but worth the work. Thanks for reminding us of the Drischner collection.. For me, Advent and Christmas are not complete without his settings of "Es ist ein' Ros" and "In dulci jubilo". > Max Drischner's _Choralvorspiele f=FCr Dorforganisten f=FCr Organ > (Harmonium) oder Klavier (C. KL. Schulltheiss Musikverlag, T=FCbingen = [in > Baden-W=FCrttenberg], 1954) is a collection everyone should have and > play. Some of the settings adapt well to c.f. in a 4' in the pedal, > though "Wunderbarer K=F6nig" is a running duo with an occasion[al] added third > voice in the right hand. The "neatest" setting of "Valet will ich dir geben" I know > is in this collection., and I've played it in services and recitals for YEARS!!   > Flor Peeters's setting in _Hymn Preludes for the Liturgical Year_ , > Op. 100, Vol. VI (C. F. Peters, No. P6406) varies in texture as it proceeds > but is not too hard. It "works."   Enjoy the rest of Memorial Day weekend indoors, in the East, anyhow...   Pat Maimone Post Chapel, West Point, NY Oct 1975 - June 2003 patmai@juno.com   ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!  
(back) Subject: Tremont Temple From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Sat, 24 May 2003 22:43:01 -0400   In response to the inquiry about Tremont Temple Baptist Church in Boston, there is (or was) a huge Casavant installed there. It has not functioned in many years. During the last National AGO Convention in Boston, I was working with Guy Therien (recently deceased, alas) and we surveyed it for a rebuild. I think the price came in at around several hundred thousand to do. I seem to recall that it is (or was) in a very shallow chamber on several levels. They never spent any money on it, so far as I know, and recently installed an Allen. Go to this link for more info: http://www.allenorgan.com/newsletter/news74.html   David Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: AGO/RCO pedals From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 May 2003 23:31:22 EDT     --part1_78.400ead94.2c01930a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hey Colin:   If you play an AGO PB regularly it would be no problemo. I played an organ in the UK w/flat PB 30 notes and it had a lot of extra space. It was a big RC church in Merseyside. This three manual dated from 1900 or 1901. Terrific spec. though. The tuner only tuned the 8' Diapason on the great, that's all the old lady used for hymns that played there. It was about 30-35 ranks. I complained to the priest that the organ was out of tune. I'll bet the tuner got a call next AM, as I was assured it had just been tuned. hehehe The pastor was Irish so he probably didn't notice anything amiss. The organist had been there since a child and was closing in on 90 in 1984 so she might have been the only organist. Bach? Forget it. the pedal board for all intents and purposes was as new as 1901. Acoustics to die for too. The company that built it had two names. Run some by me and I'll tell you which one. it was probably still playing on the original leather.   Ron Severin   --part1_78.400ead94.2c01930a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Hey Colin:<BR> <BR> If you play an AGO PB regularly it would be no problemo.<BR> I played an organ in the UK w/flat PB 30 notes and it had<BR> a lot of extra space. It was a big RC church in Merseyside.<BR> This three manual dated from 1900 or 1901. Terrific spec.<BR> though. The tuner only tuned the 8' Diapason on the<BR> great, that's all the old lady used for hymns that played there.<BR> It was about 30-35 ranks. I complained to the priest that<BR> the organ was out of tune. I'll bet the tuner got a call next<BR> AM, as I was assured it had just been tuned. hehehe<BR> The pastor was Irish so he probably didn't notice anything<BR> amiss. The organist had been there since a child and was<BR> closing in on 90 in 1984 so she might have been the only<BR> organist. Bach? Forget it. the pedal board for all intents<BR> and purposes was as new as 1901. Acoustics to die for too.<BR> The company that built it had two names. Run some by me and<BR> I'll tell you which one. it was probably still playing on the<BR> original leather.<BR> <BR> Ron Severin</FONT></HTML>   --part1_78.400ead94.2c01930a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: 32 note pedal vs. 24 note pedal From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 25 May 2003 00:14:37 -0500   > Sandra > > Practice your pedal techniques as they apply to each instrument. = Without > knowing what the musical/financial status of your church is, I > would like to > think that one day you will be playing a 32 note AGO board at your = church. > > Jim H   Not to mention that if you ever play anywhere else, most likely it'll be a 32-note.   Jeff    
(back) Subject: 32 note pedal vs. 24 note pedal From: <Wdh2@aol.com> Date: Sun, 25 May 2003 03:47:19 EDT     --part1_5f.3a0d545d.2c01cf07_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dear Sandra: I formerly played for a congregation with a 3-51 Casavant and a Hammond =   C-3 which were both used throughout the service. (I was the only organist = so they were never played simultaneously) Except for the aerobic exercise I = got during the hike from one console to the other, I found no difficulty in = playing either the 25 note flat Hammond pedalboard, or the 32 note AGO Casavant pedalboard. As mentioned earlier, proper shoes and good practice regimen = should be all you would need.   Best regards; Warren D. Hood, II   --part1_5f.3a0d545d.2c01cf07_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D4 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Times New Roman Baltic" LANG=3D3D"0">Dear Sandra:<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp; I formerly played for a congregation with a 3-51 Casavant and = a=3D Hammond C-3 which were both used throughout the service. (I was the only = or=3D ganist so they were never played simultaneously) Except for the aerobic = exer=3D cise I got during the hike from one console to the other, I found no = difficu=3D lty in playing either the 25 note flat Hammond pedalboard, or the 32 note = AG=3D O Casavant pedalboard. As mentioned earlier, proper shoes and good = practice=3D20=3D regimen should be all you would need.<BR> <BR> Best regards;<BR> Warren D. Hood, II</FONT></HTML>   --part1_5f.3a0d545d.2c01cf07_boundary--