PipeChat Digest #3708 - Thursday, May 29, 2003
 
Re: builders foreign and domestic
  by "James E. Storms" <s1328462@sensewave.com>
Re: Organ Clearing House, Wicks
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Untersatz, katz und alles!
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com>
Various
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Re: that pesky Wicks
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Organ Clearing House, Wicks
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Untersatz...
  by "Blair Anderson" <bda@shaw.ca>
RE: Bach for church
  by <Markhedm@cs.com>
Re: that pesky Wicks
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Re: recovering one's property
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organ Clearing House, Wicks
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
RE: Untersatz...
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
 

(back) Subject: Re: builders foreign and domestic From: "James E. Storms" <s1328462@sensewave.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 12:20:26 +0200   As I am not cognisant of the virtues of the FISK organ, I make no comment and will accept the glowing comments made on them at face value.   However, over generalising is dangerous - just like the proverbial "World Series" in baseball (sic!).   I give one example. A few decades ago, Canterbury Cathedral (England) renovated/restored their fine pipe organ. During this period, the replacement was a Hammond Electronic. Rumours abounded - but not proved - that financial kickbacks were involved. Nonetheless, Hammond's sales = vastly improved from ensuing advertisement.   In addition, the marriage of the organ and its building is important. = Most organ connoisseurs agreed that a mediocre instrument can sound superb in a resonant building, while a superb organ can sound average in a less than desirable structure.   Therefore, without knowing the whole story, it is dubious why the = cathedral chose FISK over its European competition.   Storms     ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2003 11:06 PM Subject: builders foreign and domestic     > I think it speaks volumes about the state of European organ-building > that an American builder (Fisk) is building in the cathedral in > Lausanne, Switzerland. There SHOULD have been a Swiss or French builder > they could have gone to for a Cavaille-Coll-inspired instrument; perhaps > there is, but one doesn't hear much of Cavaille-Coll-inspired > instruments being built in France or Switzerland these days. > > What IS going on in France (chuckle)? I know that the Church is all but > moribund ... Mass attendance is at 2%, if that ... perhaps there's no > money / interest? St. Ouen is closed; it's only used for the occasional > concert. The big Paris churches have only one or two Masses on Sunday, > and they aren't full, for the most part. > > Personally, I would put the organs that Fritts and Richards have built > (both separately and together) up against ANYTHING that's coming out of > continental Europe ... I haven't heard some of the other younger > American builders, but I've certainly heard ABOUT them, in superlatives. > > And John Brombaugh stands in a class by himself ... somebody recently > characterized him as "The Rolls-Royce of organ builders." I think that's > a fair assessment. > > For all that the Harvard Flentrop more-or-less sparked a revolution, I > think we have a much higher regard for Flentrop (for instance) in this > country than they do in Europe, as far as his NEW work is concerned ... > the restorations are another story. > > American inferiority is an old story ... Boston Music Hall went to > Germany and Walcker when they had Hook & Hastings right there in Boston, > building organs that in the long run were superior both tonally and > mechanically to Walcker. Certainly Immaculate Conception and Holy Cross > can hold their own against anything of the period in Europe. > > At the risk of repeating myself, it's time to build some organs inspired > by THOSE monumental instruments and the world-class voicing they = contain. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Clearing House, Wicks From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 07:14:48 EDT     --part1_60.31447691.2c0745a8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Poor poor wicks.   Been around forever. Kept people working when others closed.   New tonal director-new people running the ship-and the foresight to offer = the BEST of both worlds.   For this they remain vilified for past transgressions. EVERY old line builder somewhere along the line has built = busts...sometimes though poor planning OR late changes by church builders.   Being from St. Louis area originally, it amazes me to hear people hear = sing the praises of Kilgen's---plenty of bad organs---and not much nice to say = about Wicks.   Your toaster is still running and the original company deserves the opportunity to have a go at it.   By the way I sell electronics so I have NO nothing one way or the other = here. I do not care for combination organs except for 32 additions and so on.   You all keep up the stuff you are doing and get well all ye who are ill!   dale     --part1_60.31447691.2c0745a8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0">Poor poor wicks.<BR> <BR> Been around forever.&nbsp; Kept people working when others closed.<BR> <BR> New tonal director-new people running the ship-and the foresight to offer = th=3D e BEST of both worlds.<BR> <BR> For this they remain vilified for past transgressions.<BR> EVERY old line builder somewhere along the line has built = busts...sometimes=3D20=3D though poor planning OR late changes by church builders.<BR> <BR> Being from St. Louis area originally, it amazes me to hear people hear = sing=3D20=3D the praises of Kilgen's---plenty of bad organs---and not much nice to say = ab=3D out Wicks.<BR> <BR> Your toaster is still running and the original company deserves the = opportun=3D ity to have a go at it. <BR> <BR> By the way I sell electronics so I have NO nothing one way or the other = here=3D ..&nbsp; I do not care for combination organs except for 32 additions and = so=3D20=3D on.<BR> <BR> You all keep up the stuff you are doing and get well all ye who are = ill!<BR> <BR> dale<BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_60.31447691.2c0745a8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Untersatz, katz und alles! From: "John Foss" <harfo32@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 11:42:34 +0000     I looked up Untersatz in a German English dictionary - it offered me "saucer", suitable for my katz milch. "Satz"on its own seems to be a multiple meaning word - perhaps some German list member could help? I = think I have used up my poetry allowance for May unless severely provoked. It's exam week, so I am hectically busy - I had a phone call from a trumpeter friend on Tuesday who said "John - can you accompany me in our music = school end of term concert tomorrow?" "What are you playing?" "Oh it's not difficult, but nobody else can play it!" "Well, if none of our town's virtuosi can cope what makes you think I can?" "I'm desperate!" He brought =   it round. It's a new piece of modern Greek - but basically a mix of conventional western music - Bach, Chopin, Prokofiev and Jazz - all = slightly distorted. "God, I can't play that in a concert tomorrow night!" I said. = But there were tears in his eyes and a look of desperation, so I said I'd see what I could do. Well, I devoted five hours of my time to learning it, and =   found we were the last item on a programme of 29 aspiring young pianists, most of whom seemed to be about eight years old. What worried me was there =   unflappable self confidence. I hate sight reading in public at concerts, = and these kids had obviously been practising for months - with one or two exceptions who abandoned the stage in tears when they couldn't remember = what came next. Anyway, we did our number - Tassos played brilliantly as usual, =   and I bluffed my way through an approximation of the composer's intentions =   in the support role, and then I was taken out to a magnificent al fresco Greek meal - you have to experience Greek outside meals - Souvlaki, = Bifteki, Brissoles, Patates, Salates and lots of Retsina. There was the most beautiful restaurant cat hanging around with a look of profound content on =   its well fed face. I have a terrible hangover this morning. It was the Retsina that did it, your honour. I think there was a discussion about George Guest and Sir David Willcocks = a couple of digests back unless the pressure is getting to me and that was = on another list. Although one tends to associate Sir David with King's = College choir, perhaps it is less well known that he was originally best known as = an outstanding organist, though his choral conducting soon became legendary. = He kept his keyboard skills in good condition, and I heard him rehearse an English school's choir back I think, in 1978. (which year was the Declaration of Independence made in the USA?) It was a bi-centenary = concert and the rehearsal took place in a school in North London. He walked = straight in, opened the piano and without a moment's pause started straight in on = the rehearsal, both playing and directing about 350 school kids whom he had never seen before. I can't remember what the British choirs offered, but = he certainly got the best out of them. My role was that of choir director of the American Choirs - the concert took place at the Royal Albert Hall - = and it certainly gave my ego a boost to have my name alongside Sir David's on the posters outsidel. It was another this occasion I had been called in at =   the last moment, my brief this time to get a choir together from the American Schools in London as the original American Choir had cancelled. Alan Willmore played the Albert hall organ with Jonathan Rutherford on the =   piano. They made a good combination - rarely heard. In addition to the choir, I also invited an American High School rock group to perform - but this did not go down well with the Schools Music Association organisers = who felt that it was not the right sort of music for this occasion! "Sir David =   does not want a rock group!" I was told. So I went to have a word with = him. "Nonsense" he said. "I never said anything of the sort" and when they went =   on to perform he gave them every encouragement to make as much noise as = they could!   JF www.johnfoss.gr   _________________________________________________________________ Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=3Dfeatures/junkmail    
(back) Subject: Various From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 08:12:36 -0400     I feel the urge to stick in my two cents today. I agree with Ron Severin that I wouldn't be too hasty about trashing the Wicks pipe work. An intelligent, thoughtful voicer can work miracles. Richard Hartman in Orange, NJ, has did a couple of projects for me when I was doing organ work full time, and he definitely made silk purses out of sow's ears. As regards quilisma's statement that you can't attach someone's property without a judgment, that is an incorrect statement. An "attachment" is a PRE-judgment device for obtaining assurance that a judgment will be paid. Once a judgment is obtained (lucky fellow!) the court issues an "execution", which an official (usually a sheriff or constable) takes to the office where land instruments (such as deeds) are placed on record and records the execution. It is only by way of the execution (a POST-judgment device) that property can actually be taken, which is what I think quilisma was trying to say.   Lawyer for the day, David Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: that pesky Wicks From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 08:31:26 -0400   In a message dated 5/28/2003 11:47:23 PM Eastern Standard Time, = arpschneider@starband.net writes:   > Why are you referring to this as a "Toaster"? That term is > usually reserved for non-pipe instruments.   because: 1. i've played non-pipe instruments that have a better sound than this, 2. i have about as much affection for it as i do my toaster.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Clearing House, Wicks From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 08:54:55 EDT   dale, thanks for your e-mail. i'd love to have a great wicks in my = church. my problem is, how do i know the new tonal director can actually deliver = what he says when, with only one exception, every wicks i've ever heard ranged = from ordinary to wretched? it all comes down to the salesman.   now i hear you all saying, "you go and HEAR their new instruments." i = agree, but how do i know that i'm not just hearing a mediocre instrument in a = great room?   i'm not knocking what anyone is saying at all. your comments are ALL most =   welcome. it's just that i've never gone through this process before, and = i want to attack the problem from all angles, and have all questions answered for =   myself before the clergy and/or committee comes to me with the same = questions.   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: Untersatz... From: "Blair Anderson" <bda@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 08:02:17 -0500   On 5/29/03 2:06 AM, "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> wrote:   > Mention was made recently in a post about an Untersatz > 32'... >=20 > Is an Untersatz always made of metal? Or is it > sometimes made of wood? >=20 > In what was is it like or not like a Bourdon? >=20 > A sincere, inquiring mind would like to know...   Gentle ListFolk:   The online "Encyclopedia of Organ Stops" <http://www.organstops.org> gives the following information on "Untersatz":   "Contra Bourdon (English) Grand Bourdon (English, French) Gros Bourdon (French) Grossuntersatz (German) Major Bass (English) Majorbass (German)=20 Sub Bourdon (English) Soubasse (French)=20 Sous Basse (French) Subbass (German)=20 Untersatz (German)=20 Double Stopped Diapason (English) Basso Profundo (Italian?) Bordun-Subbass (German) Contrabass (German?) Diaocton (Greek)=20 Double-Stopped Bass (English) Infra Bass (Latin)=20 Grosssubbass (German) Grossunterbass (German) Pedal Pipes (English) Pileata Maxima (Latin) Unterbass (German)=20   A Bourdon stop pitched an octave lower, at 16' or 32'.   There is also a pedal mixture stop that goes by the name Grand=A0Bourdon. Major Bass is also a synonym for Contra Principal. Contrabass is more commonly a synonym for Double Bass (a string).   See also Contras Profundas, Sub Octave."   Under the "Bourdon" entry, the following is offered:   "A 16' stopped wooden flute of large scale. The name is derived from the French word bourdonner, meaning "to buzz". It is possibly the single most common 16' pedal stop. The most common name is Bourdon. It is similar to, and occasionally synonymous with, the Gedeckt and the Stopped=A0Diapason. On theatre organs, the name is bogusly used for an extension of the Concert Flute, an open stop."   All the best.   CHEERS! Blair...=20 _________________________________________ "Two enemies are just two potential friends who don't yet know each other."    
(back) Subject: RE: Bach for church From: <Markhedm@cs.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 10:43:22 EDT     --part1_15e.2087b8a4.2c07768a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   On the subject of what larger works of Bach would be good for playing = in=3D20 church, I came across a book called =3DE2=3D80=3D9CThe Complete Organist=3DE2=3D80=3D9D = by Harvey Grace=3D , published in=3D20 1950. On pages 140-141, in the chapter entitled Voluntaries, he discusses Bach. = He=3D20 writes:=3D20   Another convention is that Bach=3DE2=3D80=3D99s fugues are, ipso facto, = good postl=3D udes. =3D20 This is true of only some of them. The giving out, with Great to Principal, of such = bright,=3D =3D20 rhythmical subjects as those of the two G minor fugues, the great A minor, the D = major,=3D =3D20 or the C major (following the toccata), always seems an impertinence, and even = a=3D20 flippancy. The very tunefulness of the subjects is the trouble. They seem to strike = a=3D20 jarring note unless introduced by a prelude. Fugues that are ideal as voluntaries, from = the=3D20 manner of their beginning, are the two in B minor, the little E minor, A major, F minor, = and=3D =3D20 two in C major, the Eb, and most of all, the noble, melancholy work following = the=3D20=3D =3DE2=3D80=3D9C dorian=3DE2=3D80=3D9D toccata. Other works good for the purpose when something austere is = in=3D20 keeping are both fantasias in C minor, the Canzona, the prelude in F minor, and the = Alla=3D20 Breve, and when something bigger is required, the E minor prelude to the = =3DE2=3D80=3D9CWedge=3DE2=3D =3D80=3D9D fugue, the=3D20 toccata in F, and the preludes in B minor and C minor. The organ works of Bach (apart = fro=3D m=3D20 the choral preludes) surely divide themselves into two classes. In one the = value=3D =3D20 is purely musical; in the other (usually not less valuable as art work) the = composer=3D20 has obviously laid himself out to give players an opportunity of showing their skill. = Such=3D =3D20 works as the D major fugue, the D minor toccata, the =3DE2=3D80=3D9CWedge=3DE2=3D80=3D9D = fugue, the G m=3D ajor fantasia,=3D20 and the Eb prelude are surely recital pieces. If played in the style they seem = to=3D20 demand, they are out of place as voluntaries. Let us reserve them for recital purposes, amd = make=3D20 them as brilliant and exciting as possible. On the other hand, let us see to it = tha=3D t=3D20 we give our congregations ample opportunities of knowing the other-and deeper- side = of=3D20 Bach, by fitting and frequent performance of his more serious fugues and = choral=3D20 preludes.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D=3D20     --part1_15e.2087b8a4.2c07768a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">On the subject of what larger works of Bach = would be g=3D ood for playing in church, I came<BR> across a book called =3DE2=3D80=3D9CThe Complete Organist=3DE2=3D80=3D9D = by Harvey Grace=3D , published in 1950.&nbsp;&nbsp; On<BR> pages 140-141, in the chapter entitled Voluntaries, he discusses = Bach.&nbsp;=3D He writes: <BR> <BR> Another convention is that Bach=3DE2=3D80=3D99s fugues are, ipso facto, = good postl=3D udes.&nbsp; This is true of<BR> only some of them.&nbsp; The giving out, with Great to Principal, of such = br=3D ight, rhythmical<BR> subjects as those of the two G minor fugues, the great A minor, the D = major,=3D or the C<BR> major (following the toccata), always seems an impertinence, and even a = flip=3D pancy.&nbsp; The<BR> very tunefulness of the subjects is the trouble.&nbsp; They seem to strike = a=3D jarring note unless<BR> introduced by a prelude.&nbsp; Fugues that are ideal as voluntaries, from = th=3D e manner of their<BR> beginning, are the two in B minor, the little E minor, A major, F minor, = and=3D two in C<BR> major, the Eb, and most of all, the noble, melancholy work following = the=3D20=3D =3DE2=3D80=3D9Cdorian=3DE2=3D80=3D9D<BR> toccata. Other works good for the purpose when something austere is in = keepi=3D ng are both<BR> fantasias in C minor, the Canzona, the prelude in F minor, and the Alla = Brev=3D e, and when<BR> something bigger is required, the E minor prelude to the =3DE2=3D80=3D9CWedge=3DE2=3D =3D80=3D9D fugue, the toccata in F,<BR> and the preludes in B minor and C minor.&nbsp; The organ works of Bach = (apar=3D t from the<BR> choral preludes) surely divide themselves into two classes. In one the = value=3D is purely<BR> musical; in the other (usually not less valuable as art work) the composer = h=3D as obviously<BR> laid himself out to give players an opportunity of showing their skill. = Such=3D works as the D<BR> major fugue, the D minor toccata, the =3DE2=3D80=3D9CWedge=3DE2=3D80=3D9D = fugue, the G m=3D ajor fantasia, and the Eb<BR> prelude are surely recital pieces.&nbsp; If played in the style they seem = to=3D demand, they are out<BR> of place as voluntaries. Let us reserve them for recital purposes, amd = make=3D20=3D them as<BR> brilliant and exciting as possible.&nbsp; On the other hand, let us see to = i=3D t that we give our<BR> congregations ample opportunities of knowing the other-and deeper- side of = B=3D ach, by<BR> fitting and frequent performance of his more serious fugues and choral = prelu=3D des.=3DE2=3D80=3D9D <BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_15e.2087b8a4.2c07768a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: that pesky Wicks From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 09:55:39 -0500   No kidding, I am wondering too why non-pipe organs are referred to as "toasters". In my humble opinion there are only two types of organs, good ones and bad ones. It really is not all that difficult to find many of each variety among the good and the bad. We have all heard and played them. As many an organist will tell you, I would rather play on a good electronic than a bad pipe organ. Thank you.   Gary   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2003 11:47 PM Subject: Re: that pesky Wicks     > > here's the current stoplist of my 1952 toaster: > > Why are you referring to this as a "Toaster"? That term is > usually reserved for non-pipe instruments. > > Just wondering. . . > > Faithfully, > -- > Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO > Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. > 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 > Kenney, IL 61749-0137 > (217) 944-2454 VOX > (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE > (217) 944-2527 FAX > arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL > arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL > http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: recovering one's property From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 16:00:32 +0100 (BST)   Hello,   Humph!   Just leining on a lamp-post here.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Kealypaul <kealypaul@yahoo.com> wrote: > Leining, Leining, safe and secure from all alarms, > eh, Colin?     __________________________________________________ Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Clearing House, Wicks From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 11:58:41 EDT     --part1_143.121d9eb5.2c078831_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 5/29/2003 8:55:38 AM Eastern Daylight Time, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes:   > dale, thanks for your e-mail. You are welcome. My worthless opinion = is > yours anytime<G> > i'd love to have a great wicks in my church.   > > my problem is, how do i know the new tonal director can actually deliver =   > what > he says when, with only one exception, every wicks i've ever heard = ranged > from > ordinary to wretched? the key here is NEW! You have to hear what HE has =   > done and talk to him. I lost a great electronic dealer to Wicks because = of the > new direction brought by the new man.   it all comes down to the salesman. It really comes down to you doing your homework, the committee buying your =   conclusions and then riding herd on the builder until it is as it should = be. The salesman is usually only an agent, and they usually end up helping you =   because they want their money...I believe Wicks is actively working on = their network of representatives and that you will find them very open and = hospitable to your wishes. WHICH by the way, any person on this list would do for you = too.   have the time of your life. Many organist get to do a new or rebuilt organ =   NEVER in their life. I have done 3 and I am blessed.   Happy trails fellow players.   dale       --part1_143.121d9eb5.2c078831_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" = FACE=3D3D"=3D Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0">In a message dated 5/29/2003 8:55:38 AM Eastern = Dayl=3D ight Time, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes:<BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"A=3D rial" LANG=3D3D"0">dale, thanks for your e-mail.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; = </FONT><FON=3D T COLOR=3D3D"#ff8040" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"=3D SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">You are welcome.&nbsp; My = worthless opi=3D nion is yours anytime&lt;G&gt;</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = style=3D3D"BACKG=3D ROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"0=3D "><BR> </BLOCKQUOTE>&nbsp; i'd love to have a great wicks in my church.&nbsp; = </FON=3D T><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2 FAMI=3D LY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> <BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT=3D : 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D3D"#000000"=3D style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"A=3D rial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> my problem is, how do i know the new tonal director can actually deliver = wha=3D t <BR> he says when, with only one exception, every wicks i've ever heard ranged = fr=3D om <BR> ordinary to wretched? </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#ff8000" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-CO=3D LOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"0">the ke=3D y here is NEW!&nbsp; You have to hear what HE has done and talk to = him.&nbsp=3D ; I lost a great electronic dealer to Wicks because of the new direction = bro=3D ught by the new man.</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = style=3D3D"BA=3D CKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D =3D3D"0"><BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"> it all comes down = to the sa=3D lesman.<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#ff8040" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">It really comes down = to you=3D20=3D doing your homework, the committee buying your conclusions and then riding = h=3D erd on the&nbsp; builder until it is as it should be.&nbsp; The salesman = is=3D20=3D usually only an agent, and they usually end up helping you because they want=3D their money...I believe Wicks is actively working on their network of = repre=3D sentatives and that you will find them very open and hospitable to your = wish=3D es.&nbsp; WHICH by the way, any person on this list would do for you = too.<BR=3D > <BR> have the time of your life. Many organist get to do a new or rebuilt organ = N=3D EVER in their life.<BR> I have done 3 and I am blessed.<BR> <BR> Happy trails fellow players.<BR> <BR> dale</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D =3D3D2 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D3D2=3D FAMILY=3D3D"SERIF" FACE=3D3D"Georgia Ref" LANG=3D3D"0"><BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_143.121d9eb5.2c078831_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: Untersatz... From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Thu, 29 May 2003 13:02:22 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Untersatz (64'; 32'; 16') Wood, mostly stopped, sometimes open Pedal stop. (Source: Wolfgang Adelung, "Einfuehrung in den Orgelbau" [Introduction to organ building] Breitkopf & Haertel Wiesbaden, DE 1979) Belongs to the Subbass-family.   And yes: Untersatz is a platen to be put under a saucer or cup too :)   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.