PipeChat Digest #4092 - Monday, November 3, 2003
 
Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4091 - 11/03/03
  by <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com>
Re: Apologies and follow-up
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Roll Call
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: wedding rehearsals
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ teaching fees
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4091 - 11/03/03
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: What great music for today? (LONG)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What great music for today?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What great music for today?  ummmmm....... none
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What great music for today?
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: What great music for today? (LONG)
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 06:28:59 EST   In a message dated 11/3/2003 12:21:52 AM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@charter.net writes:   > have a request from a potential new member of the congregation I serve = to > give her organ lessons   run away and dont stop until she changes her mind <G>   no really 25 is good at least in my section of Florida   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 07:08:16 -0600   Jeff,   $25/hr is the local rate here in Wisconsin as well.   Tim ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Keys4bach@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, November 03, 2003 5:28 AM Subject: Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC     In a message dated 11/3/2003 12:21:52 AM Eastern Standard Time, = reedstop@charter.net writes:     have a request from a potential new member of the congregation I = serve to give her organ lessons     run away and dont stop until she changes her mind <G>   no really 25 is good at least in my section of Florida   dale in Florida=20     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.536 / Virus Database: 331 - Release Date: 11/3/2003  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4091 - 11/03/03 From: <hydrant@baskerbeagles.com> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 10:02:37 -0500   >From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> >Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2003 23:19:23 -0600   >I have a request from a potential new member of the congregation I serve to give her organ lessons. .... What is the going rate?   Why an off-list reply request. This seems to be of interest to many people. I recently had a member in her late 60s as for organ lessons. I really enjoy teaching and wanted the opportunity more than the money (I can't believe I said that!) so I offered her the lessons for $20/hour. She said, "Wow! That's a steal!" So I guess that $25/hour is reasonable. I, for one, am interested in what others are charging/receiving. I have put out the word that I will teach youngsters with free starter lessons just to see if their interested. No takers yet, though.   Scritchies and Haruffaroo-bahawow...   Unkie Doinky ... aka Bruce and the Baskerbeagles of HowlingAcres = http://baskerbeagles.com HELP FEED ANIMALS FOR FREE http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and = http://pets.care2.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Apologies and follow-up From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 10:30:35 -0500     On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 22:57:06 -0500 Stephen Best <sbest@borg.com> writes: > It has come to my attention that some believe my review of Felix > Hell's > recent concert in Queensbury, New York, was unnecessarily critical > of > the circumstances under which the recital took place. Where > apologies > are needed, I make them here and now. The opinions voiced were > mine > and mine alone, and I freely grant the possibility that other > opinions > may be different from my own and a more accurate representation of > the > facts. > As I was also in attendance, I can only tell the list that Steven Best's review of the "Battle of Queensbury" was VERY gentle. I can't think of any other organist in this country who would not have just flat out refused to play, and despite Mr. DeMarse's reputation for " exquisite craftsmanship and attention to every detail...." that organ was no where near ready to play for a dedication. Harold should be publicly admonished for "presenting" an organ before it's time !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!  
(back) Subject: Re: Roll Call From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 08:35:16 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Sermons!   Who needs sermons?   I forget who said it, but someone once suggested that Handel's Messiah gained more converts than all the sermons ever written.   I agree! Ban sermons!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > Two adjectives that immediately come to mind > describing current our faith > practices are earthly, and petty. They once wrote > sins down on paper and burned > them at my church.........But is burning paper and > having idiotic ceremonies the > answer? NO. Good sermons > are the answer.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears http://launch.yahoo.com/promos/britneyspears/  
(back) Subject: Re: wedding rehearsals From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2003 11:47:41 -0500   On 11/3/03 12:46 AM, "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> wrote:   > Those who read Alan regularly on this list will not be surprised to know > that his homily at that wedding was warm and wonderful, just like Alan! = It > left us all aglow.   Well, that's all well and good (I guess I fooled SOMEbody). But I was = QUITE outdone by the sartorial splendor and personal charm of the Best Man--this list's Malcolm Wechsler!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ teaching fees From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 12:04:21 EST   Hi Bruse:   $20 and $25 dollars is very reasonable. During the 80's I studied with a master teacher at $50 per hr. She was worth every penny. You come prepared when you're spending that kind of money.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4091 - 11/03/03 From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2003 12:46:11 -0500   Hi Bruce and Jeff, Heck, I paid $20 per HALF hour for trumpet lessons back in 1965. Your = rate seems dirt cheap. Granted my lessons were with the Cleveland Institute of Music, but = still. If I could figure a way to commute, I'd take organ lessons from you too. Grins Mike   hydrant@baskerbeagles.com wrote:   > >From: "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> > >Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2003 23:19:23 -0600 > > >I have a request from a potential new member of the > congregation I serve to give her organ lessons. .... What is > the going rate? > > Why an off-list reply request. This seems to be of interest > to many people. I recently had a member in her late 60s as > for organ lessons. I really enjoy teaching and wanted the > opportunity more than the money (I can't believe I said > that!) so I offered her the lessons for $20/hour. She > said, "Wow! That's a steal!" So I guess that $25/hour is > reasonable. I, for one, am interested in what others are > charging/receiving. I have put out the word that I will > teach youngsters with free starter lessons just to see if > their interested. No takers yet, though. > > Scritchies and Haruffaroo-bahawow... > > Unkie Doinky ... aka Bruce and the Baskerbeagles of HowlingAcres = http://baskerbeagles.com > HELP FEED ANIMALS FOR FREE http://tinyurl.com/2j5i and = http://pets.care2.com > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: What great music for today? (LONG) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2003 14:28:14 -0500   On 11/2/03 5:41 PM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > OK, what great organ music did people play for All Saints'/All Souls' > today? >=20 > Glenda Sutton   Glenda and les listres::   OK; you asked. Now I'll lay it on you. Lutherans do "All Saints'" on the first Sunday in November, generally, and don't have "All Souls'" on our calendars at all (at least not in America). But we did 'em up brown any way. All Saints' at 11 a.m., which was nice but not spectacular. I'll devote my report to our 3 p.m. mass in observance of All Souls.   "MUSIC FOR A KING: Baroque Motets by Michel-Richard Delalande ([Grand Motet] De profundus clamavi) and Jean=3DBaptiste Lully [Two petits motets] (O dulcissime Domine; and Domine salvum fac Regem)"   Essentially a re-enactment of a low mass for the commemoration of all faithful departed on All Souls Day, as it might have been celebrated in the Royal Chapel at Versailles in the presence of His Majesty Louis XIV, King o= f France and Navarre, in the year 1711.   Pastor Paul D. Schmiege, Pastor, was the Celebrant Cantor Pedro d'Aquino, was Director of Music   Vocal music by Saint Luke's Kantorei (about 25 professional choristers and six soloiss) Instrumental by Les Gouts R=E9unis (flute allemande, violons, viola, cello, portativ orgue (I/3).   We hauled the altar back up into the apse against the east wall, of course. Le celebrant was in black chasuble, stole, and maniple. And did all the ceremonial appropriate to the time--all in Latin, of course. One concession: As he read the Epistle and Gospel they were simultaneously translated (for the decent-sized assembly) in English. Another concession: Those who wished, communed; the congregation RARELY did so in France in those days; the king himself communed no more than five times a year. Communion was (to the shock of us Lutherans!) under one kind, of course. (While HIGHLY irregular, it is legal.) In the royal balcony stood (yesterday) the royal throne and prie-Dieu, draped in purple, with fleurs-de-lis. Earlier in that year (back to 1711, again) the king had los= t his son, the dauphin, to death; and Delalande had lost to death his only tw= o daughters. So it was a poignant All Souls=B9 Day.   Obviously, it was an AMAZING experience: Like a time machine. Watching an= d hearing a 1711 Latin mass while LISTENING to the Latin motets (which were composed to FIT against the structure of the Latin mass, being silent at th= e elevations, etc.). The congregation, to its credit, automatically stood fo= r the Gospel; some managed the occasional =B3Et cum,=B2 whether appropriate or not; some managed the Gloria tibi and the Laus tibi.   And DOUBLY a time machine: The ceremonial we were watching was almost exactly what I used in Lutheran rites in 1961 and thereafter for a decade o= r so. I'd quite forgotten that we used to DO all that stuff!   For those interested in the antiquarian exotica, a small excerpt from the extensive program notes:   The mass as celebrated in the chapel at Versailles follows the form and structure of the Roman rite as fixed by the Council of Trent (1545-63). By the end of the 17th century this Roman liturgy was firmly established in France, in most places replacing Gallican rites that had been in use since the Middle Ages. Louis XIV preferred to hear low mass in his chapel accompanied by the performance of one or more motets (typically one grand and one or two petits) by the Musique de la Chapelle. These lay musicians, vocal and instrumental, were associated with with the Chapelle de Musique, the body of ecclesiastics whose duty it was to provide for the solemn masse= s (i.e., sung in plainsong and polyphony with eleborate ceremonial). The low (i.e., spoken without note) masses were entrusted to the Chapelle-Oratoire, under the supervision of the Grande Aumonerie. The office of grand almoner was instituted by Francis I (1494-1547) to care for the king=B9s charitable works and spiritual needs. Assisted by a rota of almoners he had tremendou= s privileges at court: baptizing, espousing, and marrying members of the royal family, accompanying the king in the exercise of his devotions throughout the course of the day, and acting as de facto head of the clergy and the church in France. The daily masses were usually deputized by priest=3Dmembers of the Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem, who resided in Versailles, two of whom were always on hand at the chateau to administer th= e sacraments in the event of sudden illness or death at court.   To put it mildly: This was a splendid musical and liturgical EVENT! Envy may be unbecoming, but this time it=B9s permitted.   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: What great music for today? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2003 14:43:55 -0500   On 11/2/03 7:50 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > The Children's Sermon was about saints, so afterwards I played the = children > out to "When the Saints Go Marching In."   How extremely NEAT. How DEAD would a congregation have to be NOT to appreciate such delightful spontaneity? They gotta LUV ya!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: What great music for today? ummmmm....... none From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 03 Nov 2003 14:47:55 -0500   On 11/2/03 8:25 PM, "Myosotis51@aol.com" <Myosotis51@aol.com> wrote:   > I'm a grandma! > Well, Victoria! This is very special. Under remarkably similar circumstances I became a grandpa in 1976. My congratulations and best wishes to you, mama, and the new grandchild!   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: What great music for today? From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Sun, 2 Nov 2003 22:57:40 -0500   Well, the Baptist pastor had another agenda, although it was a good = one. So I played a rather stirring arrangement of For All The Saints, and got compliments about it after church. They remembered that long!   His sermon was about our opponent----I don't like even mentioning the name----attacking where we are weakest. So I played Onward Christian Soldiers for a postlude. Seemed to fit.   Diane   --- [This E-mail scanned for viruses by Information Boulevard's Virus = Scanning]    
(back) Subject: Re: X-POSTED - Organ Lesson question - OFF TOPIC From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 18:03:25 EST   In a message dated 11/3/03 12:21:58 AM Eastern Standard Time, reedstop@charter.net writes:   << I have a request from a potential new member of the congregation I = serve to give her organ lessons. I've not done this for YEARS, and I'm not sure = what to charge. What is the going rate? I'm not degreed, and she's not = looking for college-level instruction, so I don't feel right asking for a whole = lot. Would $25 for an hour be out of line? This isn't like a main income for me...just something to help someone out looking for some help. >>   A lot of this depends on what part of the country, and to a lesser extent, =   what the socio-economic level of the immediate area you're in. Here, just =   outside Baltimore, I charge $30 per hour for woodwind/string lessons for = middle and high school kids. If I were farther out in the suburbs (or exurbs) (or to =   the DC suburbs), $40 - 45 per hour for this age group would probably not = be out of line. I remember the last time I paid for bassoon lessons (with the principal bassoonist of the National Symphony), it was $80 per hour, and = he even had middle school students whose parents paid that amount (and this was in the =   late 80's). I was surprised when I took viola lessons with a quite gifted = and experienced teacher, and he only charged $20 per hour (mid 90's).   One thing you should get cleared up at once (if you haven't already), is = the use of the church organ (if that's where the lessons will take place). I = can imagine there will be someone grumbling as to how you're making money off "their" organ.   Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: What great music for today? (LONG) From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 17:44:39 -0600   At 2:28 PM -0500 11/3/03, Alan Freed wrote: >[SNIP] > >Essentially a re-enactment of a low mass for the commemoration of >all faithful departed on All Souls Day, as it might have been >celebrated in the Royal Chapel at Versailles in the presence of His >Majesty Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, in the year 1711.   Alan   I would have LOVED to have been there for that! It sounds magnificent. Why hadn't you posted about it prior to its happening so maybe some of the list members might have attended? Of course, Little Rock, AR to NYC is a bit too far for me to travel for something like this but I know that if anyone in this area did it I would be there!   David