PipeChat Digest #4100 - Saturday, November 8, 2003
 
Lunenburg Church Update Restoration
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Low Vision
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: New Organ in Hurricane, West Virginia
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Tim Schramm Plays Rochester Wurlitzer on Nov. 15 (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Re: New Organ in Hurricane, West Virginia
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
JS Bach in the Lutheran Church (was Re: JS Bach in the Catholic Church)
  by "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com>
Re: Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Dupr=E9's celesta
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Dupr=E9's celesta
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Lunenburg Church Update Restoration From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 09:01:24 -0400   Yesterday was an exciting day for Lunenburg. The bells have returned and were raised up in the tower, then the top = of the rebuilt churches tower was hoisted and put in place here is a link to the news story with picture http://www.herald.ns.ca/stories/2003/11/07/f202.raw.html    
(back) Subject: Re: Low Vision From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 10:14:02 EST   Does all this make you guys wonder how Vierne got around the huge console (the original one) at Notre Dame? I'm sure he had a registrant at times, = but still....wow. All the ventils, couplers, and other hook downs = etc....Blind musicians are amazing. In Chicago, there is a blind jazz organist named = Chris Foreman. He gets around the b3 very well, and seems to have a gift for remembering things like phone numbers, and voices. I once saw him = memorize two ten digit phone numbers on a break at his gig. The routine was amazing. It = took about 30 seconds, but at the end, he had it cold! Where God takes one = gift, he leaves many others. Its quite touching. gfc         Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: New Organ in Hurricane, West Virginia From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2003 10:37:53 -0500   Oh, Pooh! Of course you would rather hear a skilled musician than a = "boob". That has nothing to do with the size of the organ. There are bad big ones = and bad small ones, and good small ones. There are also good big ones, and = I'd always rather have a good big one. Present company excepted, 95% of all organists bore me and most of the listening public to tears (that is what = we are taught to do in college), so what do I care how SOMEONE ELSE would play it anyway? I only worry about what *I* would do with any given instrument, and I would always rather have twice as many excellently crafted ranks than half as many. Those who prefer pan flutes may have them. I will defend to the death my God-given right to prefer 175 stops or more. Even in my living room.   ;-)   So there! Time to crawl back under my roll-top.   -WG   P.S.: I take great delight in seeing a former president of Rodgers = building with digital innards from just a few miles south of Macungie!   P.P.S: The Leavitt Requiem went very well this past Sunday. Tonal, = tuneful, and not particularly challenging, but at the end there was not a dry seat in = the house! Personally, I'd rather do Poulenc or Durufle, but everyone else loved it.   > > I suppose someone, somewhere wants bragging rights about the biggest = organ > > they own or play. Maybe they even have the Guiness book of records in > > mind. As for me, a really good organ of less than 100 stops would be = more > > than enough for me. > > Arie: You are certainly right. There cannot be any question about it. = If > I may say so without offense, as is often said in some other contexts, = it's > not how big it is, but how skilled you are at using it for a particular > task, that counts. In MY church, I'd far rather have a skilled user of = our > 23 ranks (or even half of them) than a BOOB with 150 ranks at his > fingertips, and having no idea what to DO with them--or even worse, no = TASTE > in knowing how to handle them. > > Alan    
(back) Subject: Tim Schramm Plays Rochester Wurlitzer on Nov. 15 (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 10:47:51 -0500   Rochester theater organist Tim Schramm will debut at the Rochester Theater Organ Society's 4/23 Wurlitzer on Saturday, November 15. The performance will begin at 8 PM in the newly remodeled Auditorium Center, 875 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605.   Admission at the door is only $15 for non-members (free to RTOS members). The box office will open at 7 PM with seating starting at 7:15. For much more information, including driving directions, visit our website at http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ , e-mail kevans1@rochester.rr.com or telephone 585-544-6595. Come join us for a fine evening of entertainment.   Submitted by, Ken Evans, RTOS Director    
(back) Subject: Re: New Organ in Hurricane, West Virginia From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2003 12:57:10 -0500   On 11/7/03 10:37 AM, "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> wrote:   > Oh, Pooh! Of course you would rather hear a skilled musician than a = "boob". > That has nothing to do with the size of the organ.   Well, Walter, you must be right. God has punished me for my arrogant opinion. Our Walcker is "down" for the next three weeks. Releathering three chests in the Swellwerk, I understand. We've borrowed a little = (I/3) portativ for the rest of the month. 8, 4, and 2. Dutch.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 14:11:01 -0800 (PST)       Hi   Can anybody recommend any non-hymn-based music that would make use of the = chimes on the organ, especially suitable for meditative moments like = distribution of the communion elements, etc.?   Many thanks, Tom           --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard  
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2003 17:49:54 -0500   On 11/7/03 5:11 PM, "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com> wrote:   > Can anybody recommend any non-hymn-based music that would make use of the > chimes on the organ, especially suitable for meditative moments like > distribution of the communion elements, etc.? >=20 Tom: Interesting question. More information might be helpful. I can understand your preferring =B3non-hymn-based=B2 music. On the other hand, I think I could understand even BETTER your PREFERRING =B3hymn-based=B2 music. I=B9m thinking of =B3Schmucke dich,=B2 and =B3Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence.=B2 If I were going to do a =B3chime=B2 thing during communion, I could not IMAGNE anything better than those. Which brings us, really, to who you (and your congregation) ARE. As so often happens, it becomes a bit of a THEOLOGICAL question. So, where are you, theologically? The answer to that almost DETERMINES the answer to your question. What does communion =B3mean=B2 in your congregation?=20   On another level, why do you want to play chimes at =B3meditative moments=B2 at all? Other than distribution of communion, can you offer another example o= f =B3when=B2? There=B9s an oft-heard clich=E9 about chimes: Nothing (NOTHING!) wil= l increase the =B3take=B2 on the offerings than the chimes being played. Maybe (= I chuckle), forget communion and focus the chimes on the offertory!   Beyond THAT, if the =B3chimes stop=B2 is =B3gathering dust,=B2 maybe there=B9s a reason for that. (I=B9m not suggesting that; just asking.) I think we have to know more about YOU (in the corporate sense).   Alan              
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 18:07:43 EST   Dear Tom:   I got just what you are looking for, and I believe still in print, Chime Preludes For the Organ by Raymond H. Herbek, Broadman Press, Nashville, Tennessee $4.50 There are 14 selections in different keys. George at The Organ Stop, in San Diego, a list member may either get it for you, or he may have it in stock. These are delightful, interesting, introspective, meditative, easy pieces. Just a plug for George, a hard working, music store owner. How's that for loyalty?   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: RE: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2003 17:33:02 -0600   What about Dupre's Cortege et Litanie?     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Alan Freed Sent: Friday, November 07, 2003 4:50 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust     On 11/7/03 5:11 PM, "tom carter" <tcarter215@yahoo.com> wrote:   Can anybody recommend any non-hymn-based music that would make use of the chimes on the organ, especially suitable for meditative moments like distribution of the communion elements, etc.?        
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 18:47:31 EST   Hi ..........   The Richard Purvis "Communion" makes nice use of the chimes.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 20:10:11 -0500   Lorenz has 2 or 3 books titled "Chimings" or something like that. However, only a very few, like 2 maybe, pieces in each book are usable for a standard range of tubular chimes, 21 notes or so. The others would = be fine for electronics, that have most or all of the keyboard to range up = and down. Actually, I've had good luck with some other regular pieces that just didn't use a wide range. Use the chime for melody in one hand and a soft accompaniment on = another keyboard with the other hand. You can pull a quiet 4' flute stop along with a chime too, sounds = nice, softens the edges, and helps the tune if they get to swinging. Oh people just love chimes! You can play almost anything on them, = just a single note tune against a soft background. I do something different every week when the choir comes in. They don't actually process, but they do make a formal entrance. I finish off whatever I'm playing and = play a short chime piece to start the service. I just do it by ear. Then again, there's always Ketelby (the composer), if you want to do sound effects.   Diane   --- [This E-mail scanned for viruses by Information Boulevard's Virus = Scanning]    
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 20:13:20 EST   In a message dated 11/7/2003 5:41:11 PM Central Standard Time,=20 gksjd85@direcway.com writes: What about Dupre=E2=80=99s Cortege et Litanie? I don't think that there are chimes at Saint Sulpice, or in his home at=20 Meudon either. =20   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 19:23:14 -0600   At 8:13 PM -0500 11/7/03, Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > >In a message dated 11/7/2003 5:41:11 PM Central Standard Time, >gksjd85@direcway.com writes: > >What about Dupre's Cortege et Litanie? > >I don't think that there are chimes at Saint Sulpice, or in his home >at Meudon either.   American organists beginning with Farnam, if I am not mistaken, have used Chimes for the repeated note in the first section. I understand that Dupre also did it this way when he played the piece here in North America.   I remember one recital by David Craighead on a neo-baroque organ where he had the organist of the church play the repeated notes on Handbells. And it worked perfectly.   BTW, I wouldn't be so sure about the Meudon organ, Dupre had all sorts of various things on it that instrument that weren't "normal" for France.   David  
(back) Subject: JS Bach in the Lutheran Church (was Re: JS Bach in the Catholic Church) From: "Bill Raty" <billious@billraty.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 19:02:27 -0800 (PST)   I once worked for a Lutheran Church where the pastor objected to me playing "O mensch bewein..." as a prelude during Lent! Said he, "Bill, these are Sundays in Lent, not Lenten Sundays."   !!!   -Billious     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D    
(back) Subject: Re: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 21:33:03 -0600   There weren't any on there when I played there about 8 years ago. At least not on any of the rocker tablets on the console. It certainly was a = splendid organ, though.   > > BTW, I wouldn't be so sure about the Meudon organ, Dupre had all > sorts of various things on it that instrument that weren't "normal" > for France. > > David > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Dupr=E9's celesta From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2003 23:36:38 -0500   on 11/7/03 10:33 PM, Mark W. McClellan at omicron@prairieinet.net wrote:   The score does call for "Celesta" (with an a, not an e, at the end) on the Choir for the repeated B's in octaves on the first page. That's where chimes might be appropriate. What did Dupr=E9 have in mind by "Celesta"? Bearing in mind that the piece was originally written for instrumental ensemble, not organ, I would guess that he meant something like the celesta played in the percussion section of an orchestra, which sounds like a soft chime. He first played the piece on a piano in New York, so there is an American connection. Might he have had an American organ in mind? Is ther= e a "Celesta" on any French organs?   The Meudon is a bear to play, as it has more than the usual number of keys, middle C is not in the middle, and the keys aren't in the visual relation t= o the pedals that one is used to. And to think he used it as his practice instrument.   Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       > There weren't any on there when I played there about 8 years ago. At leas= t > not on any of the rocker tablets on the console. It certainly was a splen= did > organ, though. >=20 >>=20 >> BTW, I wouldn't be so sure about the Meudon organ, Dupre had all >> sorts of various things on it that instrument that weren't "normal" >> for France. >>=20 >> David >> "    
(back) Subject: Re: Dupr=E9's celesta From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2003 23:43:18 EST   In a message dated 11/7/2003 10:36:01 PM Central Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes: He first played the piece on a piano in New York, so there is an American connection. Might he have had an American organ in mind? Is = there a "Celesta" on any French organs? With all due respect to our esteemed colleague, Mr. Runyon, I must wonder = if Dupre had first played the piece on a piano in Ottawa, Canada or Columbia, =   South America, would we consider a Canadian or South American = "connection.?" Or is it more likely that, because he wrote the piece for the piano = (initially), with the piano in mind, and performed it on a piano when and where he performed it that it was the piano in his "mind's" ear, not a Canadian or = South American organ?   If I've missed the point entirely, I sincerely apologize.   Dale Rider Independence, Missouri