PipeChat Digest #4102 - Saturday, November 8, 2003
 
Re: Chimes and organ with piano
  by "Steav W. Bates-Congdon" <steav@coffeeconnection.net>
Piano dedication
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Chime stop, gathering dust
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Dupre's Celesta
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Dupr=E9's celesta
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Dupr=E9's celesta
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Piano dedication
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: JS Bach in the Catholic Church
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Piano dedication
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Piano dedication
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
re: classy organ-piano duets
  by <patmai@juno.com>
(no subject)
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Re: (no subject)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: (no subject)
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: (no subject)
  by "Steven Frank" <steve@virgilfox.com>
Re: RC or not RC or just C
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: (no subject)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Why did God give us battle trumpets?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Chimes and organ with piano From: "Steav W. Bates-Congdon" <steav@coffeeconnection.net> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 07:58:26 -0500     Steav W. Bates-Congdon Don't accept your dog's admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful. -- Ann Landers   > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Can anyone recommend some "classy" music for organ and piano? > Hymn arrangements are okay, but I would really like something > that is more musical than the "traditional" dotted quarter- > eighth oom-paah ta-daaa evangelical style. >   > I'd really like to find some Christmas music for organ and > piano without having to resort to the watered-down versions. > Our pianist does very nice improvisations during hymns, but is > not comfortable doing this during voluntaries. > The earlier Mannheim Steamroller Christmas albums ( I & II ) are available in spiral bound form for dual people at dual keyboards (organ/piano...pinao/piano...organ/synth et al) and are great fun to do . I do many of them with students and our congregation is very appreciative of the efforts! They are a long way from watered down and my kiddies have to count like mad men... a task I gleefully enjoy putting them thru =3D)    
(back) Subject: Piano dedication From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 08:06:10 -0500   Somebody just donated a 7-foot Steinway that's to be dedicated in January, with the now-out-of-town donor present in worship. Can I pick your brains for appropriate things to play, either alone, with the choir, or with organ?   I have books and books of nice sacred piano stuff that I use for services in the small chapel. But nothing pops out at me as being the right style and/or magnitude.   Thanks,   Chuck Peery Cincinnati    
(back) Subject: Chime stop, gathering dust From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 07:17:41 -0600   Greetings:   Although not for communion meditation, "The Bells Of St. Anne" by = Alexander Russell, from the St. Lawrence Sketches makes tasteful use of chimes.   (All four St. Lawrence Sketches were recently recorded by Wilma Jensen on = a fine Casavant.   Best Wishes,   Tom Gregory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Dupre's Celesta From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 07:29:50 -0600   If Cortege et Litanie was written/arranged for orchestra by Dupre he may have suggested using a celesta for the b octaves on the first page and the short run on the second page.   The celesta may refer to the Celeste developed the French manufacturer/musician Adolph Mustel. Mustel produced this keyboard instrument used by orchestras. He also incorporated this celeste into his harmoniums by adding a second keyboard.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Re: Dupr=E9's celesta From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 08:04:02 -0600   On the organ the "Celesta" is generally the same thing as the "Harp" stop, consisting of steel bars sounded by hammers through a mechanism similar to a piano. On Skinner organs there is generally a tenor C compass 8' Harp (49 bars), also available at 4' pitch as 4' Celesta. On some organs by other makers I have seen 4' Celesta and 8' Sub-Celesta, which amounts to the same thing. The orchestral instrument from which it is derived was invented in France by Mustel in the nineteenth century and is a keyboard instrument resembling a small upright piano. On the 1912 4/96 Casavant organ which we at QPO rebuilt for the Jacoby Symphony Hall in Jacksonville, Florida, the Celesta stop is a genuine Mustel Celesta bought from France for the purpose, and fitted with electro-pneumatic pull-downs so that it can be played from the organ.   John Speller   Randolph Runyon wrote:   >on 11/7/03 10:33 PM, Mark W. McClellan at omicron@prairieinet.net wrote: > >The score does call for "Celesta" (with an a, not an e, at the end) on = the >Choir for the repeated B's in octaves on the first page. That's where >chimes might be appropriate. What did Dupr=E9 have in mind by "Celesta"? >Bearing in mind that the piece was originally written for instrumental >ensemble, not organ, I would guess that he meant something like the = celesta >played in the percussion section of an orchestra, which sounds like a = soft >chime. He first played the piece on a piano in New York, so there is an >American connection. Might he have had an American organ in mind? Is = there >a "Celesta" on any French organs? > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Dupr=E9's celesta From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 09:27:52 -0500   You're right; what I wrote makes no sense. What I had in mind was that if he was in New York when he first played the piece, then even though that first performance took place on a piano perhaps he soon thereafter played i= t on an American organ, so that he had an American organ in mind when he registered the piece for publication. I was just piecing together bits of information from Gilles Cantagruel's _La Musique de l'orgue_ Cantagruel writes in his biographical note on the composer that Dupr=E9 began concertizing in the U.S. in 1921. In his note on the Cort=E8ge et Litanie, which he dates 1922, Cantagruel writes: "This diptych is taken from a work for the theatre destined to be played by an instrumental ensemble. The wor= k was played on the piano at a soir=E9e in New York; at the request of his impresario, Dupr=E9 wrote a version for organ, which influenced Jehan Alain's 'Litanies.' There is also a version for organ and orchestra." From this w= e may infer that Dupr=E9 might have written the version for organ soon after th= e New York piano performance, in response to his [possibly American] impresario's request, and that he subsequently played it on an American organ during his U.S. concert tour. That might account for the "Celesta" registration indication, for if as I am given to understand chimes have no place on French organs, there is perhaps no readily available French term for "chimes," with the result that he actually meant "chimes" when he wrote "celesta," since the celesta found in orchestras is the nearest equivalent.   I have just now read John Speller's post, and he answers my question. Evidently--as I gather from Tom Gregory's post and Mr. Speller's--while the celesta is a French invention, it does not appear on French organs, though it does on American ones. I'm lucky to have a Harp stop, so that I can pla= y the Cort=E8ge et Litanie more authentically than with chimes.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 11/7/03 11:43 PM, ProOrgo53@aol.com at ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   In a message dated 11/7/2003 10:36:01 PM Central Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes: He first played the piece on a piano in New York, so there is an American connection. Might he have had an American organ in mind? Is ther= e a "Celesta" on any French organs? With all due respect to our esteemed colleague, Mr. Runyon, I must wonder i= f Dupre had first played the piece on a piano in Ottawa, Canada or Columbia, South America, would we consider a Canadian or South American "connection.?= " Or is it more likely that, because he wrote the piece for the piano (initially), with the piano in mind, and performed it on a piano when and where he performed it that it was the piano in his "mind's" ear, not a Canadian or South American organ? =20 If I've missed the point entirely, I sincerely apologize. =20 Dale Rider Independence, Missouri          
(back) Subject: Re: Piano dedication From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 09:36:09 -0500   For choir and piano I'd suggest, in a classical vein, Jean Sibelius's "Onward, Ye Peoples." And there are a lot of good anthems out there in a gospel and country vein with good piano accompaniments, e.g., arrangements by Jack Schrader and Howard Helvey (a fellow Cincinnatian, by the way).   I wouldn't miss the opportunity on dedication day of playing a Chopin polonaise and the Fantasy-Impromptu.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu           on 11/8/03 8:06 AM, Charles Peery at cepeery@earthlink.net wrote:   > Somebody just donated a 7-foot Steinway that's to be dedicated in > January, with the now-out-of-town donor present in worship. Can I pick > your brains for appropriate things to play, either alone, with the > choir, or with organ? > > I have books and books of nice sacred piano stuff that I use for > services in the small chapel. But nothing pops out at me as being the > right style and/or magnitude. > > Thanks, > > Chuck Peery > Cincinnati > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: JS Bach in the Catholic Church From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 09:41:25 EST   In a message dated 11/6/2003 11:36:02 AM Eastern Standard Time, mike6514@hotmail.com writes:     > Is Bach considered "taboo" in the Catholic setting? Is he considered > strictly Lutheran or non-Catholic? Schubler Chorales, Orgelbuchlein = (sp?), > his Liturgical Year book etc. If so, I got to purchase a whole new set = of > books. Please, only factual information, no opinions. (I rely on this = list > to educate me.) > >   No, they are not taboo in the RC church. I grew up in that church, and = played a LOT of bach, as did the other organists at that church. FWIW, if Bach = was taboo, then the student organists we employed from Catholic U (in = Washington DC) were being tought taboo materials. Both Conrad Bernier and Dale = Kreider used the Orgelbuchlein as required repertoire. (gee, that dates me doesn't it? Bernier retired in the late 1970's. gaaaak). Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano dedication From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 09:57:22 -0500   A couple more choral suggestions that would show the "gospel" possibilities of the grand piano to good advantage: Ed Lojeski's arrangement of Precious Lord (Anton Armstrong's St. Olaf Choir sings this version) and Jack Schrader's arrangement of Andra=E9 Crouch's Soon and Very Soon.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: RE: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 08:51:03 -0600   Did Knowles also do a set of variations of the Star-Spangled Banner? I remember Dudley Buck's variations, but not Knowles. I'll have to look those up.   I remember the first time I heard Knowles' variations on the Austrian Hymn, it was at the hands of Jane Parker-Smith - exhaustingly exhilarating.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Malcolm Wechsler   Anne Marie Rigler - Wednesday, June 25th, 2003 St. John's U.C.C., Boalsburg, Pennsylvania   Next up, a dashing and dexterous performance of a work by John Knowles Paine (1839-1906), who was the teacher of Arthur Foote. Concert Variations on the Austrian Hymn (opus 3). Many will know better, perhaps, the Star Spangled Banner Variations, and this work is similar in many ways. Its intricacies were deftly handled, with a final variation that was nothing less than dazzling. The Fugue at the end was fully satisfying.          
(back) Subject: Re: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03 From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 09:09:31 -0600   It pains me to have to say that you won't find him under "Knowles," but I know you'll find him if you try the moniker John Knowles Paine. Yes he did write variations on The Star-Spangled Banner. Good stuff.   Bob Lind ----- Original Message ----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, November 08, 2003 8:51 AM Subject: RE: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03     > Did Knowles also do a set of variations of the Star-Spangled Banner? I > remember Dudley Buck's variations, but not Knowles. I'll have to look > those up. > > I remember the first time I heard Knowles' variations on the Austrian > Hymn, it was at the hands of Jane Parker-Smith - exhaustingly > exhilarating. > > Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano dedication From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 09:18:43 -0600   Also look into SATB/piano anthems by Craig Courtney and Mark Hayes. I ca= n suggest some specific things if you're interested.   Bob Lind   ---- Original Message -----   > A couple more choral suggestions that would show the "gospel" possibilities > of the grand piano to good advantage: Ed Lojeski's arrangement of Precious > Lord (Anton Armstrong's St. Olaf Choir sings this version) and Jack > Schrader's arrangement of Andra=E9 Crouch's Soon and Very Soon. > > Randy Runyon    
(back) Subject: Re: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 10:28:53 -0500   Dear Heart,   You have failed the reading test. Note, just one sentence further on: = "Many will know better, perhaps, the Star Spangled Banner Variations, and this work is similar in many ways."   There will be a further test later.   Cheers,   Der getreuer Schulmeister   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, November 08, 2003 9:51 AM Subject: RE: OHS 2003 - Sixth Full Day 6-25-03     > Did Knowles also do a set of variations of the Star-Spangled Banner? I > remember Dudley Buck's variations, but not Knowles. I'll have to look > those up. > > I remember the first time I heard Knowles' variations on the Austrian > Hymn, it was at the hands of Jane Parker-Smith - exhaustingly > exhilarating. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Malcolm Wechsler > > Anne Marie Rigler - Wednesday, June 25th, 2003 > St. John's U.C.C., Boalsburg, Pennsylvania > > Next up, a dashing and dexterous performance of a work by John Knowles > Paine > (1839-1906), who was the teacher of Arthur Foote. Concert Variations on > the > Austrian Hymn (opus 3). Many will know better, perhaps, the Star > Spangled > Banner Variations, and this work is similar in many ways. Its > intricacies > were deftly handled, with a final variation that was nothing less than > dazzling. The Fugue at the end was fully satisfying. > >      
(back) Subject: re: classy organ-piano duets From: <patmai@juno.com> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 18:46:55 GMT     Dear Pipechatters,   Greetings from sunny southern California, where we have celebrated my = rocket scientist son Mark's birthday in fine style. He works for NASA on the [now traveling] Mars Rover[s] at JPL.   Cesar Franck's "Prelude, Fugue and Variation" for organ and piano comes = immediately to mind, even after only one cup of coffee. It is of moderate = difficulty for both performers, if memory serves.   Charles Callahan has done some fine settings of hymns for organ alone = and also wrote at least one elaborate organ-piano duet on "Amazing = Grace," with quite a different twist for the pianist. The one time we = performed the Callahan setting at West Point, it went over very well and I = was inspired to record it. The pianist, however, did not wish to do so. = Alas, no recording from the Post Chapel. Perhaps there is one extant on a = Morning Star Organ Music Preview cassette tape.   Retired life is good, although it does not pay as well! Planning = meetings continue for the June 22-25, 2005 AGO Convention for Regions II = and III in the Central Hudson Valley. Please see http://chvago.org for = details.   Regards to all, Pat Maimone patmai@juno.com   ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!  
(back) Subject: (no subject) From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 14:23:14 EST   In a message dated 11/6/2003 11:36:02 AM Eastern Standard Time, mike6514@hotmail.com writes:       Is Bach considered "taboo" in the Catholic setting? Is he considered strictly Lutheran or non-Catholic? Schubler Chorales, Orgelbuchlein (sp?), =   his Liturgical Year book etc. If so, I got to purchase a whole new set of books. Please, only factual information, no opinions. (I rely on this list =   to educate me.)     I waited to reply to this since I was quite bitter, having "resigned" = after 25 years at my RC parish, last Sunday. After playing my 5th Mass that = weekend, and 56 years of playing, I just had enough of the indifference of a = young, new pastor and the arrogance of a Nun (Pastoral Assistant) who by-passed = the Liturgy/Music Committee and volunteers (like myself) in the various = ministries. She would change the service formats, even the Mass at which the choir = was scheduled to sing, and not say a word until the last minute. Surprise on = a Saturday evening: "I changed the choir to another Mass this Sunday; I = hope you will be available to play; I just called the Director and told him!" = Enough was enough. The priest is either totally intimidated and/or couldn't care =   less. Anyway, to the point at issue: in an RC church, Bach depends on the abilities of the incumbent organist. Most places where there is a paid, = full-timer, you have Bach and music from the other Masters, even Preludes and = Postludes. I tired Preludes but Ushers, Deacons and the Nun would walk up to the pulpit =   microphone and start making announcements, yelling over the organ until I = would stop. Complain, Yes. Answer: "The announcement(s) was important." Unfortunately, many RC churches do not pay enough to engage a well = trained organist who can play Bach. They make do with poorly paid organists or volunteers, like me, who have minimal formal training and who play what = they are capable of.....some are not bad, many are inadequate. The priests, in many instances, couldn't care less whether Bach is played as-long-as there is accompaniment for hymns and the sung parts of the = Mass. If no organist, a keyboard player or guitar combo will do. A "musically = inclined" pastor may engage a competent organist and start that parish on the road = to "good music," but the reluctance, or inability, to pay a decent salary discourages trained organists and sends them to other denominations where = they have a future. RC churches, with exceptions, are not places where well trained organists can earn just compensation. Ergo, Bach may not be played in = most, but not because it is banned or undesirable.    
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 14:49:08 -0500   On 11/8/03 2:23 PM, "RVScara@aol.com" <RVScara@aol.com> wrote:   >> I waited to reply to this since I was quite bitter, having "resigned" af= ter >> 25 years at my RC parish, last Sunday. After playing my 5th Mass that >> weekend, and 56 years of playing, I just had enough of the indifference= of a >> young, new pastor and the arrogance of a Nun (Pastoral Assistant) who >> by-passed the Liturgy/Music Committee and volunteers (like myself) in th= e >> various ministries. She would change the service formats, even the Mass = at >> which the choir was scheduled to sing, and not say a word until the las= t >> minute. =20   Ron, I profoundly share your bitter disappointment. I realize that your conscience will not permit you to become a separated brother of the Luthera= n persuasion, and cannot suggest that you go against conscience. Even Luther=B9s most often heard quotation, =B3Ich kann nichts anders=B2 (forget my spelling) makes that impossible for you.   I look forward optimistically to news of a happier relocation.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 12:10:14 -0800   Echoing what Alan said...   I'm sorry the young blood at your parish made life unbearable for so many people. But as Alan said, they are just two people, and one parish -- surel= y there are other congregations around which would love to make use of your talents!   Eric     On 11/8/03 11:49 AM, Alan Freed said something about:   > On 11/8/03 2:23 PM, "RVScara@aol.com" <RVScara@aol.com> wrote: >=20 >>> I waited to reply to this since I was quite bitter, having "resigned" a= fter >>> 25 years at my RC parish, last Sunday. After playing my 5th Mass that >>> weekend, and 56 years of playing, I just had enough of the indifferenc= e of >>> a >>> young, new pastor and the arrogance of a Nun (Pastoral Assistant) who >>> by-passed the Liturgy/Music Committee and volunteers (like myself) in t= he >>> various ministries. She would change the service formats, even the Mass= at >>> which the choir was scheduled to sing, and not say a word until the la= st >>> minute. =20 >=20 > Ron, I profoundly share your bitter disappointment. I realize that your > conscience will not permit you to become a separated brother of the Luthe= ran > persuasion, and cannot suggest that you go against conscience. Even > Luther=B9s most often heard quotation, =B3Ich kann nichts anders=B2 (forget my > spelling) makes that impossible for you. >=20 > I look forward optimistically to news of a happier relocation. >=20 > Alan >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: (no subject) From: "Steven Frank" <steve@virgilfox.com> Date: Sat, 08 Nov 2003 15:17:20 -0500   on 11/8/03 3:10 PM, Eric McKirdy wrote:   > I'm sorry the young blood at your parish made life unbearable for so = many > people. But as Alan said, they are just two people, and one parish...     But they are not just two people. Their name is legion. And they run many, many parishes.   Steve    
(back) Subject: Re: RC or not RC or just C From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 15:56:11 EST   Dear RVS:   It makes one wonder what passes for pastoral assistants these days. They used to be priests. Now I hear of non deaconate class nuns doing this job. Shall we call this church American Catholic and be done with it? It and some recent posts seem to herald this to be true, especially from what Jay tells us. Cardinal Arinze is correct. What we have is a decided move away from Roman Catholicism to the designer do it yourselfers. It is not Roman Catholic, so let's just say a form of catholic but not Catholic. I've heard some perfectly scandalous reports of nuns or lay people actually "reading" the mass. This is not Roman Catholic either but a charade of purpose. This is an agenda item of the left. My heart goes out to you, but it was predicted by Jesus himself in Matt. 24. The schism took place quite a while ago, but there are still some of us who believe in Rome and its authority. Without any authority beyond local bishops makes the American Catholic Church, Episcopal not Roman. ECUSA need not get riled up as I have made a distinction here. The problem lies in the poor formation of catholics in general that allows for these kinds of = takeovers, especially after Vatican II. It sorta looks the same, but is it? That's the real question to be asked. Is it? The answer is no. Authority is what it is and comes from the head down to the body. I don't remember Jesus giving this kind of permission to mere bishops but to Peter alone. Tu Es Petrus, et super hanc petrus in eccleasiam suam. That is what I remember of the latin and there may be some words that I've long since forgotten. Without Peter, there is no church. Even protestants take an extreme interest in the Papacy and who fills Peter's shoes. Not all American bishops are anti Roman, but there is a trend and it is protestant. I don't make this stuff up, I see it and merely report what I see happening. It would be much easier for me to ignore it, but I can't. I am a man of principal, and I can't condone these messes or just leave them alone. I have to say something and wish it could all be positive. The trends are there.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: RE: (no subject) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 17:53:57 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Somewhat comforting that such things happen in other countries too. I = won't start another thread about bitter organist's feelings, but RVScara@aol.com wrote on pipechat:   > I tired Preludes but Ushers, Deacons and the Nun would walk up to the pulpit microphone > and start making announcements, yelling over the organ until I would stop.   Yeap!! That happens in my parish church too! My reaction: Trompette + Basson-Oboe + Superoctave-coupler. Fortunatedly our ol' II/24er still has more power than the darn public amp system. My answer to complaints afterwards: "Why, I don't interrupt your sermons either!" - Bad tongues = say that my enlargement 1987 was done with the purpose to shut off untimely announcements with more success, but this is a shameless overstatement :) I don't play Bach (or any literature) there for exactly these reasons. I improvise all since 20 years... it's better for my health.   Back to happy things: saturday afternoon is my "day off"- mass is in = charge of the Schola Guitarum. I just finished the last corrections on a new = series for you. Have a nice weekend and stay tuned :)   Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Why did God give us battle trumpets? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2003 14:45:54 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Now look here!   An organist always gets the last word on issues such as this.....why else did God give us heavy pressure reeds?   This is what you do.......     You agree with absolutely everything they say, but then change all the tunes just a few seconds before each hymn.......using really obscure ones that no-one knows.   Then miss out the last verse on each, because you felt them to be inappropriate.   You then unsettle the entire congregation by improvising in the style of Messaien before, during and after Mass.   Play VERY loudly during communion.   Prepare the choir with a new mass setting but don't warn anybody.   Of course, this only leaves two options. They either want to talk to you suddenly, or you get the sack.   Either way, they don't ignore you or forget you in a hurry!!   I KNOW IT WORKS....I've done it.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         > <RVScara@aol.com> wrote: > > >> I waited to reply to this since I was quite > bitter, having "resigned" after > >> 25 years at my RC parish, last Sunday. After > playing my 5th Mass that > >> weekend, and 56 years of playing, I just had > enough of the indifference of a > >> young, new pastor and the arrogance of a Nun > (Pastoral Assistant)   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree