PipeChat Digest #4116 - Monday, November 17, 2003
 
Re: Alhborn Expander Modules
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
18th cty barrel organ 04
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: handbell keybored
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: handbell keybored
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Skills of a church musician. (was: Carpenter and Hell?)
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
Re: Carpenter and Hell?
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
James Busby - S. Stephen's, Providence, RI
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Skills of a church musician. (was: Carpenter and Hell?)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Leslie Speaker Cables and Sheet Music for Sale
  by "Stan Guy" <texstan@earthlink.net>
Invitation to Festal Evensong at St Dunstan's (xposted)
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Concert commemorating "Kristallnacht".
  by <Gamelpt@aol.com>
Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca>
The glory of Scandinavia.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Alhborn Expander Modules From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 05:50:52 EST   In a message dated 11/15/2003 7:56:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, walterg@nauticom.net writes:   > I don't understand the rave reviews - they don't sound very good to me. > >     I've got an Ahlborn-Galanti Romantic module and it's one of the best = sounding modules I've heard. Sure there are a few things on there that I'd do differently, but it's not the quality of the sample, it's just the sample = itself. The French Horn, the Tuba, the Clarinet and the English Horn are = absolutely gorgeous. The Orchestral Flute is good, but a little stringy for my = taste. The Diapason is quite nice, too. There is actually a lot of voicing that = can be done, and when done carefully, it can be matched quite well to the organ = it's attached to.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: 18th cty barrel organ 04 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 07:48:36 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   18th cty barrel organ part 04 (description of the organ)   The barrel organ has a 31 note compass from d=B4 to a=B4=B4=B4 without f#= '''. Letting out certain pipes which wouldn't be used too often was a common practice in barrel organ building. The pipes are relatively narrow scaled. Original pipes are made of oak wo= od and some of them conserve scribed names in german designation [c, cis, d, dis e, f , fis etc]. The windchest is made of maple. The wind system consists of two feeder bellows and a wedge shaped reservoir. From there a miniature wind trunk g= oes to the windchest. The tracker system consists of a brass clavier and a set of wooden push r= ods which open the pallets. The roller is made of oak wood. The tune is recorded in snail form: as th= e roller rotates to play the tune it advances in longitudinal direction, pushed by a special mechanism (alike the wax cylinders on the first phonographs). Both clock movement and the barrel organ are mounted on a 3= 5 mm [1-1/4"] thick base plate made of oak wood. The narrow scaled pipes, the brass made clavier and the oak wooden roller with forward advance mechanism in snail form are clues for a possible fre= nch manufacture. More technical details will be given in the restoration repo= rt.   The restoration of the barrel organ first was commended to Alessandro Zar= a, who is specialist in restoration and replica making of historical orchest= ra wind instruments. Mr. Zara made some restoring work on it, but in late 19= 98 he reccomended to submit the mechanism to an organ specialist. This way t= he barrel organ arrived in my workshop on December 08 1998. To say it mildly: it was in a sad state despite Zara's efforts. The base plate had warped and shrinked, therefore cracked- for this the entire mechanism was loose and out of level. The windchest, which body is made o= f a massive maple block, was heavily damaged by termites and also warped. In = a former repair attempt somebody had glued on the pallet box baseboard (whi= ch must be detacheable) with heavy-duty PVC glue (!). The push rods set was worn out and useless. The clavier had been bent in an effort to make an adjustment. Half of the movement gears were lost, and some of the remaini= ng pieces showed an advanced wearout and traces from earlier interventions. = The wind system was completely rotten away, the (lost) wind trunk replaced by= a plastic hose. Many pipes were copies of lost originals; and the whole pipework had severe speech failures.   As it's known to restorers, the worst damages come from misleaded repair attempts. If the barrel organ would have been left alone the job would ha= ve been a routine cleaning, releathering and adjustment. But here too many cooks had spoiled a priceless pottage and I spent the 1998 holidays [whic= h in Venezuela are main workshop/business vacation] at my desk or workbech, sometimes until 11 pm. My first task was to make an exact survey, plans drawing and photographing of the remaining original pieces; the second ta= sk was a "guess-what-was-here-once-upon-a-time" which led to a first previou= s design of missing parts; and then a close study of the specialized literature to see if my guess was correct, which led to a second previous design. Only then the restoration itself could be started.   (will be ctd.)    
(back) Subject: Re: handbell keybored From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 10:37:49 -0500   Exactly. It was a great idea. I had been approached to do the software and electronic engineering on the project, and then suddenly there was no project. Too bad. It would be nice to hear handbell music without all = the wrong notes and bad timing! ;-) I shouldn't be so harsh, eh? My = church has three handbell choirs. Good people, and they try very hard. = Sometimes I just can't help wishing I was in control.   -WG     > "james nerstheimer" <enigma1685@hotmail.com> wrote: > > Would that be the Holsworthy Handbell Carillon that I used to see > advertised? > > jim > > O):^)    
(back) Subject: Re: handbell keybored From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 11:10:39 EST   The Holsworthy Handbell Carillon perhaps was an idea before it's time. There has been mention of a very few organs, probably numerbale on one hand, that possess the ability to play handbells in a similar way to the Holsworthy action, but played from the console. I've always liked this idea and would make a marvelous percussion stop on any liturgical organ. IMHO it should be explored again especially for organ's equiped with midi. Many electric actioned pipe organs are now being built with mutiple memories for pistons and midi. Units compatible with midi could be placed and installed in one day because the connection is quite simple. If I'm not mistaken, handbells come in three, four and five octave sets. It would also be possible to hard wire for older installations. How about one for a tracker organ too. I know midi can be installed on a tracker organ. J=E4ger and Brommer did it on a small portable tracker displayed at AGO 2000 in Seattle. it was on it's way to an organist's studio in Australia.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Skills of a church musician. (was: Carpenter and Hell?) From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 19:31:45 +0100   This statement surprises. It would be interesting to learn about basis and reasons of this rather quick judgment of Pastor Freed.   Felix   --            
(back) Subject: Re: Carpenter and Hell? From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 19:47:52 +0100     Alan Freed wrote:   quote   "Someday," perhaps. But I think that requires a whole different set of skills than those with which he has been equipped thus far. I don't think he should even consider that for at least 10 to 15 years (minimum). Just wouldn't be right. Possibly never. Just a different package.   end of quote   Paul Emmons wrote:   quote   It apparently doesn't take long for the cream to rise to the top. Most of our top church musicians in recent decades have secured really prestigious, important posts while still in their twenties, initially through brilliant organ playing. They went straight from an assistant position at a major cathedral or chapel (John Scott, for instance, was evoking oohs and ahs at the AGO national in 1980, already at St. Paul's Cathedral London as Barry Rose's assistant, still a kid, or so it seemed.) to the principal position at the same or another without so much as a layover in First Main Street Pretheran. The rest of us might grit our teeth in our respective boonies all our lives, but that seems to be how it works, because of their outstanding talent and their ability to get others to notice it early.   There are very few, if any, such animals as the "concert organist" who make their entire living and reputation for decades simply from playing recitals and making recordings. Who else is in that category? Carlo Curley? Hector Olivera? Gillian Weir? Maybe (I'm not acquainted with any of their biographies). I'd venture to say that Dame Gillian is the only one of those three whose standing in the larger serious music world compares with that of a great pianist like Rubinstein yesterday or Schiff today. With all due respect to the other two, and Olivera is both very talented and a very nice person, their image seems more middle-brow, somewhat like Liberace's. I doubt that Felix would head in that direction for the sake of a career entirely as an organ virtuoso.   The vast majority of our important recital and recording artists are also church musicians, teachers, or both. And since, if you're going to be an organ teacher, you'll be teaching future church musicians for the most part, it would certainly be advisable to be a respectably accomplished church musician oneself. So it has been with all my teachers. So it is with John Weaver, Felix's teacher. It is the same abroad, I think.   Of course, the most important consideration is what Felix himself aspires to do. Many with his caliber of talent have eventually transcended their instruments to become distinguished conductors. For the sake of the organ, I hope that he will stay in our fold for at least a couple of decades, and am merely pondering how other very talented organists have proceeded to do that with fulfillment.   end of quote   Thank you, Paul, for your thoughtful analysis. And: you are absolutely right, it will be first of all my very personal consideration, what I will be aspiring to do in future, regardless, whether or not I am equipped with the skills and talent s needed.       --            
(back) Subject: James Busby - S. Stephen's, Providence, RI From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 14:08:12 -0500   James Busby, Sunday, November 16th, 2003 S. Stephen's Church, Providence, Rhode Island - 6:15   I have a very good friend who sings in the choir at St. Stephen's, and I = was much moved by a recording of this choir he once gave me. It is unique in = its contents, and uniquely fine in its quality. It's a so-called "straight = tone" choir, which was particularly refreshing to me at the time I heard the CD, because I had just been listening to a high-pressure choir of men and = women, all singing the most delicate church music as if it were Pagliacci writ large, or Pavarotti writ even larger! When I was asked by my friend to = come to a recital by the choir director and Organist, James Busby, I thought I ought - and I did. After supper in Providence with my 6'7" friend, known forever as Big Mike, I pushed and prodded him into the passenger seat of = my MINI, and we headed over to the church, and heard the following program:   Batalla Imperial, de cinque tono (on the fifth tone) . . . Juan Bautista Jose Cabanilles   (1644-1712) Of Battle Trumpets, this Organ has none, but the playing was so vigorous = and martial that one easily forgot all that. There is mind over matter, and = also sheer musicality over an instrument. In music, the Lord giveth and taketh away freely. Musicologists do the same, and have now decided that this glorious piece is to be taken from Cabanilles and given, as a Harpsichord piece, to Johann Kaspar Kerll. Neither these two nor I give too much of a fig. In the hands of James Busby, this was a wonderful flourish, and a = great opening piece. Tell Cabanilles to wait twenty years, and he'll surely get his piece back!   Allegro . . . Joao de Sousa Carvalho (1745-1798). The battle o'er, this piece was rather Harpsichord-like, registered with much tinkle, and = another example of a very rich legacy of Spanish keyboard music most of us hardly know. I appreciate the chance to have heard it.   Sonata on the First Tone . . . Jose Lidon (1752-1827) This work is, if I recall correctly, marked as for "Harpsichord, or for Organ with a = Trompetta Real" - that's "re-al" in Spanish, two syllables, as in Royal. (The = internet lists are unkind to diacriticals.) The piece hit many of us by storm, in what may well have been it's first appearance on the scene, in a fabulous = LP recording from St. John's College Cambridge, making use of the first "en chamade" reed stop in the U.K. A number of us rushed off to the late, lamented Orpheus Music Shop in New York, mentioning Lidon and singing the tune to the clever guy behind the counter. He smiled, and went somewhere = in the back and brought us copies of "Silva Iberica," letting us know that we were the latest in a small line of supplicants. Mr. Busby chose to take = his inspiration, to an extent, from the Harpsichord part of the directions for the piece, although he did use a not very commanding Trumpet for the solo line. It was played with an articulation that gave the performance great life, and despite the memory of that George Guest performance with blazing Trumpet at St. John's, was nonetheless fully exciting.   La Romanesca con cinque mutanze (with five variations) . . . Antonio = Valente   (c. 1520-c. 1580) If you know the so-called Pachelbel Canon, and who does not, you will understand the idea of this piece - a repeated tune in the bass (known, in this case, as La Romanesca), with wondrous variations above. It and the Carvalho pieces are also found in Silva Iberica. Valente was a Neapolitan, but the writing is very Iberian in feeling.   ----------------   Fantasia et Fuga in G, BWV 542 . . . J. S. Bach (1685-1750) With this = work, an Organist reveals something about his prowess at the keyboard that is = not so necessarily apparent in the fabulous four pieces opening this recital. = It has to do with articulation, the keyboard touch, the space between notes, which can have a tremendous influence on the impact a performance will = have on the listener, in many cases without the listener understanding why or how. This early 19th century Austin is not the quintessential Bach Organ, believe me. It is bundled up warmly in side chambers, with nothing really freed up to come to us directly. There is a chest of whistles on the west end of the chancel, stage left, speaking indeed directly at us, and I thought now was the time we would hear them, for better or for worse. We = did not, and it was only in talking with James Busby after, that I learned = that this pipework, improbably, is the Pedal Upperwork, in a perfect position, = in direct line of sight and hearing for us, to fully obliterate anything in = the manuals, be it played ever so gently. (This Organ, by the way, is surely a most effective instrument for choral accompaniment in a situation in = which, as here, the choir is seated in the chancel. A fine recording of the = choir, which I have been enjoying a great deal, attests to that. More about the recording later.) Through sure control of touch, NOT the super articulated staccato we sometimes heard in the 60s, this very dense mass of polyphony was rendered completely clear and immensely exciting to us. The Fugue was = at a pleasantly moderate pace, and was absolutely gripping to the end. This = was a great performance, full of dignity and excitement.   ----------------   Robert Schumann (1810-1856) Canon in B Minor, Opus 56 Sketch in D flat, Opus 58, No. 4 Sketch in F Minor, Opus 58, No. 3 In Mr. Busby's (always) well chosen and clearly delivered remarks, we learned of Schumann's output for the Pedal Piano, brought on by the new availability of such an instrument in Leipzig. We heard the selection = listed above, perhaps the three best known of these, and they were registered brilliantly, with lots of color - AND - James gets a place in the Pantheon of those who really know how to use an expression pedal to bring out inner voices, to shape phrases, and to bring the whole enterprise alive. It was superb.     Here followed warmly welcoming comments from the Rector, The Rev. John D. Alexander. One often assumes that anyone named John D. is probably named with hopefulness after that Rockefeller feller. Anyway, I was struck by = the way in which Fr. Alexander announced one particular item. We were offered = a complete listing of music sung and yet to be sung in the church during = this 2003-2004 "season," something indeed wanting reading, marking, and = inwardly digesting. There is much to be learned from reading this remarkable list. Digestion, I am not so sure about, although the paper is of good quality. The rector said something like, "in this list, you will have an idea of = what WE are doing musically." I thought, how wonderful. It was not "they," it = was WE. We're in this together. Hooray.   The plate followed upon that quickly, and I gladly gave of my treasure, while not being quite a John D myself!   ---------------   Choral in B Minor . . . Cesar Franck (1822-1890) What to say about a performance of this exquisite piece of musical architecture from the last years of the great Cesar Franck? It had an incredible pace - and I do NOT mean fast. It just had a wonderful forward motion asked for, I think, in this great passacaglia of sorts. This was an event.   Esquisses Byzantines . . . Henri Mulet (1878-1967) That's what it said in the program, and then underneath: Tu es petra et portae inferi non praevalebunt adversus te, for which I attempt: "Thou art Peter, and the gates of hell will not prevail against thee," in case any reading this are latin impaired!! In this work, we had a built in encore, already pre-ordained. The applause following this carillon/toccata was long and enthusiastic. It's interesting that this is not a "standing ovation" = crowd, or as Don Herron had it, "standing ovulation!" We were not mystically = raised to our feet by a virtuosic, breakneck performance of the "Widor Toccata." But make no mistake, we heard true virtuosity of a different kind - thoughtful, instrospective, assured - totally able to reach its hearers = not with a drag me to my feet impulse, but able to leave one a bit quiet at = the experience of such music so amply released to us by a generous performer. Hail James Busby!   If you want to experience some of the music of this place, click on http://www.sstephens.org/page9.html and learn the contents of, and how to order, the CD, "Stephen, Full of Grace." It's the Christmas gift none of your friends have, and believe me, it is really fine.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com              
(back) Subject: Re: Skills of a church musician. (was: Carpenter and Hell?) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 11:56:08 -0800 (PST)   Felix,   You should understand that you are merely an organist!   It is the absolute right of every pipechatter to listen, judge, criticise, offer advice and perhaps try to shape your entire destiny.   You should only start worrying when we are no longer concerned.   As they say in showbiz, "Any publicity is GOOD publicity".   What you must do is to politely agree with absolutely everything anyone on the list says, and then ignore it completely.   We may be a "ship of fools", but at least we're a good natured crew.   When do we get to hear you in the UK?   I just can't wait to criticise your performance!!!!   ;-)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Hell-Felix@t-online.de wrote: > This statement surprises. It would be interesting > to learn about basis > and reasons of this rather quick judgment of Pastor > Freed. > > Felix > > -- > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree  
(back) Subject: Leslie Speaker Cables and Sheet Music for Sale From: "Stan Guy" <texstan@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 14:24:35 -0600     Dear List Members---   I have two items that might be of interest to some here for sale on eBay:   5 Leslie Speaker Cables item #2573993117   1500 sheets of piano/vocal music item #2574003714   Please email me privately if you have any questions.   Best Regards,   Stan Guy Dallas      
(back) Subject: Invitation to Festal Evensong at St Dunstan's (xposted) From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 16:08:14 -0500     You are cordially invited to   A Festal Evensong   St. Dunstan's Episcopal Church 1830 Kirby Road McLean, Virginia 22101   Sunday, November 23, 2003 at 4:00 pm   in celebration of the dedication of the new Schlicker pipe organ, the chancel renovations, and the chapel renovations.   A festive reception will follow the service.   The Rev'd Joseph Webb, Rector Mr. Rick Stockdale, Choirmaster and Organist        
(back) Subject: Re: Concert commemorating "Kristallnacht". From: <Gamelpt@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 16:51:51 EST   Alan, I'm in New Jersey. But I'd love to visit Norway sometime. Jon Gamel  
(back) Subject: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 16:14:53 -0700   I'm contemplating a recital/lecture in a few months on French Organ music = and need to do something on Couperin.   When my organ teacher taught it to me, he dictated exactly how the = ornaments should be done. The problem is, I'm doing a different piece and = I don't understand the theory behind what he taught me.   I can't read French well enough to understand the original, so downloading = Couperin's harpsichord book isn't going to help.   Is there an online resource that exhaustively explains Couperin's = ornaments and performance practice specifically as it relates to the two = organ masses?    
(back) Subject: The glory of Scandinavia. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 18:29:14 -0500   On 11/17/03 4:51 PM, "Gamelpt@aol.com" <Gamelpt@aol.com> wrote:   > Alan, > I'm in New Jersey. But I'd love to visit Norway sometime. Jon Gamel   Aha! I knew there had to be a connection. I TOO would love to do that. = I finally did Sweden some years ago. Probably will never make Norway; too gamel, now.   Alan (half norsk; half svensk)   Www.stlukesnyc.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 19:46:57 EST   Dear Bruce:   Andre Marshal made a recording of both Masses by Couperin. I played them until I nearly wore them out. I think Couperin used trills to cover some notes in Meantone that might have been dicey. It does add to the charm of the pieces but I don't have a trill book out there trying to do it the way he would have done it, I just trill and have fun with it. It may not be historical, but it is fun to listen to and sounds authentic enough. There is a bit of freedom of choice. I for one don't beat myself up over playing just the right ones, but enjoy playing his pieces.   Ron Severin PS Not very scholarly, but honest.    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 21:34:14 EST   In a message dated 11/17/2003 6:48:31 PM Central Standard Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes: Dear Bruce:   Andre Marshal made a recording of both Masses by Couperin. I played them until I nearly wore them out. I think Couperin used trills to cover some notes in Meantone that might have been dicey. It does add to the charm of the pieces but I don't have a trill book out there trying to do it the way he would have done it, I just trill and have fun with it. It may not be historical, but it is fun to listen to and sounds authentic enough. There is a bit of freedom of choice. I for one don't beat myself up over playing just the right ones, but enjoy playing his pieces.   Ron Severin PS Not very scholarly, but honest. For insight on Couperin's ornamentation, gety a copy of "L' Arte de = Toucher le Clavecin" Also study the harpsichord music. It is of unparalleled beauty, and FULL = of tricky ornaments. Also, the titles of the pieces are all quite unique! I =   think that its certainly an early example of "programmatic" thought. = Plain and simple, ornaments are just part of the style. As one of my teacher's = said, (and I believe Goethe originally said) "God is in the details." cheers, gfc     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 21:35:25 EST   In a message dated 11/17/2003 5:20:56 PM Central Standard Time, bruce.shaw@shaw.ca writes: Is there an online resource that exhaustively explains Couperin's = ornaments and performance practice specifically as it relates to the two organ = masses? hmmmm...there's an idea for a doctoral thesis! LOL gfc   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2003 22:10:23 EST   Dear Greg.   I can see going to the trouble of learning all the right ornaments if I was going to make a definitive recording, or play them for peers in recital. For the average Joe six pack, he doesn't care. He doesn't even know most of the hymns I try to introduce, and I'm talking about old traditional hymns everybody "SHOULD" know, but don't. They're just happy because I play all the right notes and don't get too loud. <Smile>   Ron