PipeChat Digest #4120 - Thursday, November 20, 2003
 
Re: Widor recordings
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Widor recordings
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
18th cty barrel organ - intermezzo
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Qui Siret?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca>
RE: Widor recordings
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Widor recordings
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Widor recordings
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Widor recordings
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Now Thank We All Our God
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Joel Armengaud" <jarmengaud@apsydev.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Widor recordings
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Widor recordings
  by "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 09:29:07 -0500   At 10:41 PM 2003-11-18 -0800, you wrote: >Certainly two of the finest are the Ben van Oosten (MDG) and Herman Van >Vliet (?) series... I also have heard parts of the Pierre Pincmaille >series, which is nice >as well. > >Another favorite (albeit not on a French organ) is the set by Guenter >Kaunzinger recorded on the large 6-manual Jann organ at the Waldsassen = Basilica >and the big Klais at Limburg. Kaunzinger plays with fire and passion, = and >I quite forget the organs are modern German... Highly recommended = (Novalis >label) >Alas, Kaunziger's Vieren cycle is out of issue - it is fine as well... > >Best wishes, > >Jonathan Orwig >----- Original Message ----- >Sent: Tuesday, November 18, 2003 9:29 PM >Subject: Widor recordings > >I am seeking the wisdom of the many astute members as to their opinions = as >to the best recordings of the Widor symphonies. >Thanks and regards:) >Dick Siegel   Dick,   Another fine recording is by Daniel Chorzempa, on Phillips from the mid 80s. It was recorded on the St. Ouen Cavaille Coll organ, and the sound is great. I forget now which symphonies had did on that recording.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 10:48:13 -0500   Colin and Co.,   I have never heard the name Sirret, but John Henderson has, spelled with = one r, Nicholas Siret, (1663-1754). He was, according to John, a friend of Couperin, and published two books of Harpsichord pieces, three of which = can be found in <Les Maitres francais de l"orgue . . . > No mention of any = Organ music, but as these are published in books of Organ music, they presumably made it across the divide.   Cheers,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 18, 2003 3:45 PM Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin     > Hello, > <snip, snip, snip>   > Now one for the scholars.....has the music of the > Baroque composer/organist Sirret ever surfaced? > > > Colin Mitchell (UK - a very Scottish name for someone > descended from France; the historic family name being > Barass) >      
(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 09:33:35 -0800   Arie (and others),   This recording was at St-Sernin, Tolouse, and is IMHO the FINEST = rendition that I have ever heard of Sym. 10. Also included on the disc is Sym 5, = which is a fine performance as well.   After writing yesterday, I also remembered an old mono recording I have = of Dupre playing Sym. 9 at St-Sulpice.... if one discounts the recording quality, = this is probably the best recording of the 9th I have heard (although Clarence Watter's = rendition is a close 2nd place, only due to being performed on a non C-C organ)   -Jonathan Orwig   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Arie Vandenberg=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 6:29 AM Subject: Re: Widor recordings   Dick,   Another fine recording is by Daniel Chorzempa, on Phillips from the = mid 80s. It was recorded on the St. Ouen Cavaille Coll organ, and the = sound is great. I forget now which symphonies had did on that = recording.   Arie V.=20   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263=20     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.542 / Virus Database: 336 - Release Date: 11/19/03    
(back) Subject: 18th cty barrel organ - intermezzo From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 14:32:25 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   Before I continue, some words about restoration of historical objects.   Until recent, restoration of historical objects was mostly a cleanup, repair, replacement of damaged, wornout or even mean-looking parts with = more or less accurate reproductions, and polish-up-affair, without altering the existing condition of the object in significant manner but without caring too much for existing details too. Right now, restoration is a so wide and complex field that I cannot give = but a very overall explanation at the margin of this little series.   Three things must be known in advance: 1) The decay process of an object begins at the very moment the object is finished. 2) Any intervention, = even the slightest, constitutes an alteration of the object. 3) Any restorer is working on an intellectual property he has to respect and alter as less as possible- but it's natural, therefore unavoidable that he leaves his own traces on it. All this is what makes modern restoration so tricky. The actual restorer must be able to relinquish his own peronality and put himself in the shoes of the character who built the object; to respect and understand his intentions and aesthetics; and to know the social = environment and the available technical resources at the moment the object was built.   There are two criteria for restorations. First: the historical object must show its history -not only its original state but all worthful alterations and interventions over the time- alike the strata in an archeological = site. Its present condition must be preserved with a minimum of additions or alterations. Original materials (called "Substance" in our argot) must be conserved the most as even possible (if necessary reinforced, 'refreshed' = or otherwise treated). If replacements are made however they should be = clearly visible and differentiated from the original substance. A more radical = point of view says that the object must be put back into its original condition elliminating all additions and alterations, and the restorer shouldn't = leave behind any traces of his intervention. This first criterion prevails in Europe and involves a lot of knowledge in spezialized research and analysis methods and sometimes very sophisticated restoring techniques. The advantage of this criterion is that the history of the object remains visible and traceable on the object itself. The disadvantage lies in the complicated task -therefore high cost- of the restoration, the question = how far we can go in preserving original substance versus reliable long term functioning, and the fact that the restorer may become a mere entity- but restorers usually are artisans, therefore characters who, at least in sub-conscious manner, wish to perpetuate their own personality.   The second criterion is: The historical object should look like new, work like new and -in case of technical equipment- it has to be updated to current codes and standards concerning its function. This second criterion prevails in our latitudes. Its advantage: The = restored object looks nice and proper; new materials and spare parts ensure a long termed and safe use life. The restorer doesn't have to be a highly degreed specialist (which anyway are hard to get here) but more a skilled technician, and has more liberty to leave traces of his work and skill behind. Therefore he becomes part of the object's history and -again most = at sub-conscious level- he may feel more satisfaction and love for his task. The disadvantage is obvious: to make the object "look and work like new" implies and encourages alterations and -sometimes unnecessary- loss of original substance. Replacing parts, refinishing, painting over or polishing; indiscriminate use of "modern" supplies like synthetic glues, compounds, paints or varnishes can alter, even damage original substance = and function and elliminate important traces which track the history of the object- unless the restorer(s) made an extensive record of the found condition first, and their alterations are easy to identify and retrieve.   Despite the scientific aspects, restoration is an art and = arts&crafts-bound profession. So many restorers - so many opinions about the best methods = and criteria which lead to opposed points of view and discussions. Most restorers must choose a midway which is suitable to: a) condition of the object; b) expected work to do on it; c) location of = the object; d) the intended further use of the object; e) available resources, specialists and personnel. The latter can be very critical in so called "third world counries" like mine. Outside the technical skill, the restorer must know the current guidelines and be able to put himself in the shoes of the character who built the object as noted. But from a certain moment on the absolute criterion stops and artisanal experience and instinct begins to dictate what would be the best to do (or not to do) for each individual case. This calls for extreme honesty and consciousness. It's clear that in the hands of amateurs, = laymen or even well meaning and skilled but not well informed restorers, huge and sometimes irreversible damage can happen.   A good compromise would be to leave the historical object alone as it is = and build an exact replica for use. But then, understanding people would complain that it isn't "The Real Thing"- and be right in this. In cases of too altered, unrepairable or unrestorable historical objects this becomes the only practical solution, however. In any case the photographs, = surveys, drawings and restoration reports should be accurate and comprehensive = enough to enable a replica manufacture of the restored object.   For more interesting details, "know how" and discussions I reccomend the lecture of "Towards the Conservation and Restoration of Historic Organs", available at the OHS catalog. The GoArt Institute from the Goteborg University in Sweden makes magnificent researches and publishes many up to date printed materials too.   (will be ctd)      
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 10:01:27 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   First a correction....I mentioned the performances of Couperin by Andre Isoir....that was nonsense. I actually meant Michel Chapuis, which, as you can see, is astonishly close to name Andre Isoir!!   Ron Severin suggests that the exact ornamentation doesn't matter, and that the exact methodology of Couperin is not known. Unfortunately, that's a bit far fetched.   Couperin complained that musicians could not be bothered to learn his ornaments or execute them properly.   In "L'art de toucher le clavecin", he sets out a very exact table of ornamentations, and how they should be played. There are English and German translations of this available.   These same ornaments would be exactly the same for the organ.   Other French composers used different ornaments, and as with Bach, the ornaments do not always mean the same thing twice. So there is latitude in performance, and what sounds right is usually quite acceptable....but not with Francois Couperin, I'm afraid.   It really does take a lot of learning, and I'm not sure that I can even remember what half the ornaments mean any more, let alone how they might be exactly played.   I guess the easiest way is to listen to recordings of very respected scholars such as Chapuis, and then....erm.....(I'll whisper this).....crib what they do!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > > Biggs didn't beat himself up over trill preciseness, > and I figure what > was good enough for him is good enough for me. Now, > nobody is > really absolutely sure, beyond a shadow of a doubt > how Francois > Couperin ornamented his music   > I play similarly to Andre > Marshal and > my ornaments are every bit as good as his.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree  
(back) Subject: Qui Siret? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 10:11:38 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Siret....I was wondering how the name was spelled...thanks for that.   I believe that Siret had a very important position within the royal court as an organist, and I suspect that he may well have written organ music.   To be absolutely honest, I have not the slightest interest, but I suspect that 25 years ago, when I stumbled upon this, the works may have been unpublished at that time.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Malcolm Wechsler <manderusa@earthlink.net> wrote: > Colin and Co., > > I have never heard the name Sirret, but John > Henderson has, spelled with one > r, Nicholas Siret, (1663-1754). He was, according to > John, a friend of > Couperin, and published two books of Harpsichord > pieces, three of which can > be found in <Les Maitres francais de l"orgue . . . > > No mention of any Organ > music, but as these are published in books of Organ > music, they presumably > made it across the divide. > > Cheers, > > Malcolm >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 11:58:47 -0700     > I can see going to the trouble of learning all the right ornaments if > I was going to make a definitive recording, or play them for peers > in recital. For the average Joe six pack, he doesn't care.   This is for a lecture/demonstration of French Organ music, possibly for = video/audio recording. I have to get it right. Peers will be in the = audience.   J. W. Bruce Shaw Organist and Choirmaster St. Stephen the Martyr Anglican Edmonton, AB, CANADA    
(back) Subject: RE: Widor recordings From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 14:18:17 -0500   > After writing yesterday, I also remembered an old mono recording I = have of Dupre playing Sym. 9 at St-Sulpice.... if one discounts the recording quality, = this is probably the best recording of the 9th I have heard=20   Yes, I'd agree-- but having grown up on that recording made by one of = Widor's star pupils on Widor's instrument, I can't quite imagine the = piece going much differently, so perhaps I'm just biased.   This recording does omit the trio variation in the last movement. But = please listen very carefully. Don't you, too, hear an echo of it just = before the toccata section? I think that Dupre had played it and the = engineers or editors cut it out for some reason, perhaps only so that = the symphony would fit on one side of an LP.   This is an interesting question, because Dupre is reported to have said = that Widor had second thoughts about the trio variation and came to = dislike it. Yet, although he was wont to make revisions to his music = before a reprinting, he never dropped it from later editions. And, as I = say, it seems that Dupre did intend to retain it for this recording.   I like this section very well myself and enjoy playing it.    
(back) Subject: RE: Widor recordings From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 14:22:20 -0500   > Ben Van Oosten!   Does he play the Symphonie Romane and the Suite Latine on the same CD? = If so, I'm almost certain that his is the recording that has been in my = "juke box" for months. (The problem with such a machine is that the = music keeps coming around every week or two, but you don't see or handle = the covers, so sometimes you forget exactly what you're hearing.) =20   It's definitely on a Cavaille-Coll, it's glorious, and I would certainly = agree with the recommendation.    
(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 14:51:04 -0500   At 09:33 AM 2003-11-19 -0800, you wrote: >Arie (and others), > >This recording was at St-Sernin, Tolouse, and is IMHO the FINEST = rendition >that I have ever heard of Sym. 10. Also included on the disc is Sym 5, = which >is a fine performance as well. > >After writing yesterday, I also remembered an old mono recording I have = of >Dupre >playing Sym. 9 at St-Sulpice.... if one discounts the recording quality, >this is probably >the best recording of the 9th I have heard (although Clarence Watter's >rendition is a close >2nd place, only due to being performed on a non C-C organ) > >-Jonathan Orwig   Jonathon,   I believe you are correct, about the organ Chorzempa used for these recordings. In any case these are desert island type recordings, and also =   show why recordings of these symphonies should be done on large Cavaille Coll organs. The music sounds so right then.   Another good recording by Chorzempa was of some of Liszt music on the De Doelen organ in Rotterdam. Fabulous!   Also, I noticed that some of Handel's Organ Concerti by Chorzempa, has = been re-released on 4 channel SACD. Beautiful recordings, that I'm sure sound stunning on the new format. These were recorded in analog in the mid 70s.   Too bad, he doesn't seem to be doing anything in the organ world anymore. He was such a talent, and had a tremendous technique which he = put at the service of the music he played.   Arie   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263  
(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 15:35:34 EST   In a message dated 11/19/2003 2:33:31 PM Central Standard Time, PEMMONS@wcupa.edu writes: Does he play the Symphonie Romane and the Suite Latine on the same CD? If =   so, I'm almost certain that his is the recording that has been in my "juke = box" for months. (The problem with such a machine is that the music keeps = coming around every week or two, but you don't see or handle the covers, so = sometimes you forget exactly what you're hearing.)   It's definitely on a Cavaille-Coll, it's glorious, and I would certainly agree with the recommendation. Yes he does. They are wonderful symphonies. Very dramatic, emotion = laden. Deep stuff, from a very mature Widor.   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 12:45:58 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   When is this taking place?   There are, as I say, English translations of Couperin's "L'art de toucher le clavecin", but it depends how much time you have available.   What about on-line Couperin enthusiasts?   There must be something on the net somewhere, but after a brief search, I have yet to come up with anything definitive. I think one of the translations is a Canadian sourced one.   I'll have a look through my books, but I'm not optimistic....anyone else able to help here?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- bruce.shaw@shaw.ca wrote: > > This is for a lecture/demonstration of French Organ > music, possibly for video/audio recording. I have > to get it right. Peers will be in the audience.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree  
(back) Subject: RE: Now Thank We All Our God From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 17:02:40 -0500   Oh, fiddle-stix, Shelley asked for postludes and well-known settings, = and this favorite of mine is, evidently, neither. But I'd like to = mention it anyway:   Oxford University Press does or a generation ago did publish, as sheet = music, a delightful setting by Leopold Heinrich Herzogenberg (Austrian, = 1843-1900). The c.f. is in the pedal on an 8' or 4' solo stop, under = quiet but not necessarily slow figurations in the manuals. It's a trio = texture, at least most of the time. It sounds to me as though the = composer might have been thinking of bird songs for some of the manual = motives, anticipating Messiaen.   According to New Grove, he was a friend of Brahms and Spitta, an admirer = of Bach, Schutz and Protestant church music while remaining a Roman = Catholic, and an absorber of various "influences" making his own = compositions derivative. But I don't know of another piece quite like = this little charmer.          
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Joel Armengaud" <jarmengaud@apsydev.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 23:41:23 +0100   I am French, if you need some help... ;-)   -Joel Armengaud, France   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 9:45 PM Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin     > Hello, > > When is this taking place? > > There are, as I say, English translations of > Couperin's "L'art de toucher le clavecin", but it > depends how much time you have available. > > What about on-line Couperin enthusiasts? > > There must be something on the net somewhere, but > after a brief search, I have yet to come up with > anything definitive. I think one of the translations > is a Canadian sourced one. > > I'll have a look through my books, but I'm not > optimistic....anyone else able to help here? > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > --- bruce.shaw@shaw.ca wrote: > > > > This is for a lecture/demonstration of French Organ > > music, possibly for video/audio recording. I have > > to get it right. Peers will be in the audience. > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard > http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 18:02:39 EST   In a message dated 11/19/2003 5:00:23 PM Central Standard Time, jarmengaud@apsydev.com writes: I am French, if you need some help... ;-)   -Joel Armengaud, France You read my mind! Good of you to speak up! I was going so suggest finding = a French friend (for those of us who are too lazy to order a 12 dollar book) = LOL greg   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 19:13:01 EST   http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0739007602/qid=3D1069287064/s= r=3D1-9 /ref=3Dsr_1_9/002-0913490-5762463?v=3Dglance&s=3Dbooks       Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 21:43:27 -0500   Dear List,   I have a totally glorious recording of my very favorite Widor Symphony, = the 9th, Symphonie Gothique. The Organist is the Canadian, Jacques Boucher. = The Organ is that of The Gesu in Montreal, an enormous Casavant from 1901, rebuilt in 1954, and then further rebuilt in 1986 by Guilbault-Therien, = all in a superb acoustic. I don't think it needs to make any apologies to Cavaille-Coll. It sounds fabulous and so does Boucher. I was about to say: "On the other side of the recording," but I just caught myself. The rest = of the recording contains music of Joseph Bonnet, pieces I did not know, but with which I entered into love at first hearing. Three Versets on Ave = Maris Stella; Prelude to Salve Regina, and Six Versets in the Form of Variations on Magnificat. This is, I think, wonderful music, and as a bonus, we hear = at the end, the famous Concert Variations. Every time I hear that, I find myself humming the theme for several days.   This is an REM edition, and I suspect I picked it up either at this = summer's OHS Convention or in a visit to the OHS office, after the Board meeting, when I plundered the place somewhat.   I strongly commend this recording to you. It was recorded in 1991 or 2.   Cheers,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 2:18 PM Subject: RE: Widor recordings     > After writing yesterday, I also remembered an old mono recording I have = of Dupre playing Sym. 9 at St-Sulpice.... if one discounts the recording quality, this is probably the best recording of the 9th I have heard   Yes, I'd agree-- but having grown up on that recording made by one of Widor's star pupils on Widor's instrument, I can't quite imagine the piece going much differently, so perhaps I'm just biased.   This recording does omit the trio variation in the last movement. But please listen very carefully. Don't you, too, hear an echo of it just before the toccata section? I think that Dupre had played it and the engineers or editors cut it out for some reason, perhaps only so that the symphony would fit on one side of an LP.   This is an interesting question, because Dupre is reported to have said = that Widor had second thoughts about the trio variation and came to dislike it. Yet, although he was wont to make revisions to his music before a reprinting, he never dropped it from later editions. And, as I say, it seems that Dupre did intend to retain it for this recording.   I like this section very well myself and enjoy playing it.      
(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: "leora holcomb" <leh637@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 20:37:24 -0800 (PST)   Keith tells me he prefers the Dupre recordings of the Widor organ music. = Lee   RSiegel920@aol.com wrote:I am seeking the wisdom of the many astute = members as to their opinions as to the best recordings of the Widor = symphonies. Thanks and regards:) Dick Siegel       --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now