PipeChat Digest #4121 - Friday, November 21, 2003
 
Ditties - was Now Thank We All Our God
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Widor recordings
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Preservation/Restoration in Caracas
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Preservation/Restoration in Caracas
  by "Kealypaul" <kealypaul@yahoo.com>
Re: Paul Creston
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Now Thank We All Our God
  by <FastToccata@aol.com>
Re: Ornamentation in French Baroque music
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: ornamentation
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca>
NICHOLAS KYNASTON IN ATHENS
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Finzi Anthem (off-topic)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Ornamentation in Couperin
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Skinner stuff
  by "C. Joseph Nichols" <cjn@nicholsandsimpson.com>
 

(back) Subject: Ditties - was Now Thank We All Our God From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2003 10:00:05 -0000   For Nun Danket - there's really no contest - Karg-Elert has so much = panache.   Mention of Flor Peeters 30 Chorale preludes (Nun Danket Is Op 69 No 1) brings to mind the lovely settings of 'The Star proclaims the King is = here' and 'O Sacred Head once wounded' in Op 70.   Also another of his Chorale preludes (I can't remember which) for which I was taken to task for playing the well-known ditty 'There's a hole in your bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza'.   Any more suggestions for other things to avoid because they are so much = like some irreverent ditty.   Regards   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 3:06 AM Subject: Re: Now Thank We All Our God     > Hmmm... > > I'd go off the beaten track a bit and suggest Egil Hovland's Toccata... > it's not really THAT hard, and it _is_ different... > > Also, Flor Peeters wrote a nice arrangement in the set of 30 larger chorale > preludes - > can't remember if it's in op. 68, 69 or 70 (there were 3 volumes of 10 each) > > If you're looking for something shorter and easier, Franz Schmidt's Chorale > prelude > is one that comes to mind - it has a nice majestic lilt to it. > > I'm sure I'll thnk of more as soon as I send this off.... > > Jonathan > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, November 18, 2003 12:50 PM > Subject: Now Thank We All Our God > > > > Good afternoon, pipechat buddies! > > > > Does any one have any favorite arrangements of Now Thank We All Our = God > > that would be appropriate for a postlude? Or what are the more > > well-known settings? Thanks a bunch! > > > > Shelley > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > --- > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). > Version: 6.0.542 / Virus Database: 336 - Release Date: 11/18/03 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Widor recordings From: <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 08:41:45 EST   Many thanks to all who replied to my question re: the best recordings. Thanks and regards:) Dick Siegel    
(back) Subject: Preservation/Restoration in Caracas From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 11:20:54 -0500   I think my favorite words to see on a PipeChat post are those that occur at the end of a post from Andr=E9s:   (will be ctd)   I LOVE reading his meticulous accounts, eloquent essays, etc. I hope they will "be ctd" ad infinitum.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Preservation/Restoration in Caracas From: "Kealypaul" <kealypaul@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 08:27:12 -0800 (PST)   Agreed! What a wealth of research flows from him. This list offers such a variety of well-rounded topics and discussion, and everyting Andres writes is a keeper.   ....Alan wrote ...   I think my favorite words to see on a PipeChat post are those that occur at the end of a post from Andr=E9s:   (will be ctd)   I LOVE reading his meticulous accounts, eloquent essays, etc. I hope they will "be ctd" ad infinitum.   Alan     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now http://companion.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Paul Creston From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 08:31:44 -0800 (PST)   Hello Richard,   I've finally managed to cure a very elusive fault on my record deck, and am now able to record the Creston Toccata for you.   I will do this asap, and send to you in the next day or two.   Sorry it's taken so long.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Richard Hazelip <rhazelip1@yahoo.com> wrote: > Is there any possibility of your recording that > Toccata on a tape player and mailing the tape to me > stateside? I reside at 10318 Munn St., Houston, > Texas 77029, USA.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now http://companion.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 11:59:29 -0500   On 11/17/03 9:34 PM, "Gfc234@aol.com" <Gfc234@aol.com> wrote:   > As one of my teachers said, (and I believe Goethe originally said) "God = is in > the details." > I thought that was (architect) Mies van der Rohe. But maybe he was = quoting Goethe.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Now Thank We All Our God From: <FastToccata@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 12:42:36 EST   I have used the Karg-Elert of "Now Thank We All Our God" and people don't seem to recognize it as that hymn because you don't hear the hymn tune and = don't have a lot of appreciation for the piece. I have found another piece = which I like just as well which does incorporate the hymn tune and also uses parts =   from Karg-Elert. It makes a great postlude piece and ends really big! Congregations seems to really like it. The piece was written for Diane = Bish by Fred Bock. The piece is in a book called "The Organ Music of Fred Bock" - Vol. = 1 - Six Hymn Tunes. The title of the piece is "Postlude on Now Thank We All = Our God". There are several other pieces in this book that are really nice = also. You can get the book from Hal Leonard Pub. ISBN 0-6340-0357-7, = HL08738397.    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in French Baroque music From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:52:46 +0000 (GMT)   Dear list, I have just returned from Athens where I heard the Klais organ in the Concert Hall in a recital by Nicholas Kynaston. His programme was based around the theme of the influence of Bach's contemporaries on his music, and began with 5 verses from the Organ Mass by De Grigny. It was a superb recital by one of the world's great masters of the instrument, and his ornamentation of the De Grigny was spell binding. He was playing from an edition presented to him with an inscription by Ralph Downes. I will give you a full report of this occasion as soon as I have a moment to sit and down and type in what I wrote on the train coming home this morning. The only thing I cannot find is the specification of the organ - but it was well worth the 1,000 km. journey I made for the occasion. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Line from Plati Kippers   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: ornamentation From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 13:15:45 -0600   Hello, Colin,   I don't think your friend was so wrong either. Last summer a professor told us almost the same thing when we were working on a piece by Rorem that accented the second beat.   > "Before trying to play French music, you should > listen to French language. There you will find > inegalitie in abundance, and the over dotted rhythms > of the French Baroque".   Alicia      
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 12:19:32 -0700   >When is this taking place?   Not for at least six months, longer if I can't put the cash together to = rent the hall, so I've got a bit of time.        
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <bruce.shaw@shaw.ca> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 12:38:43 -0700   >I guess the easiest way is to listen to recordings of very respected = scholars such as Chapuis, and then....erm.....(I'll whisper this).....crib = what they do!   That was plan B. Recording is on order.   J. W. Bruce Shaw Organist and Choirmaster St. Stephen the Martyr Anglican Edmonton, AB, CANADA        
(back) Subject: NICHOLAS KYNASTON IN ATHENS From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 21:50:51 +0000 (GMT)   NICHOLAS KYNASTON A RECITAL ON THE FOUR MANUAL KLAIS ORGAN IN THE ATHENS CONCERT HALL (MEGARON MUSIKIS) 19TH NOVEMBER 2003   A few years back the BBC produced a major television series =93In the footsteps of Alexander the Great=94. Near the beginning Michael Wood, the presenter, is to be seen walking in the mists and snows near the peak of Mount Olympus. Then he swoops eagle-like to the platform of the station in Katerini, and says in magisterial tones =93=85=85 and it was from here that Alexander started his journey.=94 I expect his train was late, but nowadays the world of the Greek railways is not what it was, and the modern inter city trains tend to run on time, which removes some of the adventure from ones travels. I departed from this same spot yesterday morning at 11 a.m., having enjoyed a coffee and crisp croissant sitting outside in the sun, though my ambition on this occasion was not to conquer Afghanistan, Egypt and Asia, or indeed anywhere else, but to go to Athens to hear Nicholas Kynaston play a recital on the four manual Klais organ in the elegant modern concert hall. The organ, a gift from the German government, celebrates its tenth birthday this year. It is a magnificent instrument with clear choruses, colourful reeds immaculate voicing and regulation and a comprehensive specification capable of coping effortlessly with the entire concert organist=92s repertoire. It was in impeccable condition for this occasion. Its position at the back of this very beautiful room, whose 2 second echo gives a warmth lacking in, say, the Royal Festival Hall, projects the sound directly into the audience, and it must be one of the finest recital instruments in Europe. The theme of Nicholas Kynaston=92s recital on this occasion was Organ Music of the Baroque Era, particularly in relation to the influence on Bach of the French and North European school as represented by De Grigny, Bohm and Buxtehude. It opened with five verses from Nicholas De Grigny=92s organ mass. In the 5 part Kyrie en Taille we were immediately aware of being the presence of a master. The intricate ornamentation, a significant feature of French music of the Baroque Era, was played with immaculate precision, yet a sensitivity which made it appear as if it were the composer improvising, as if we were hearing it for the first time. Each of the verses displayed a different aspect of the organ=92s tonal palette, registered as De Grigny directed. The reeds are French in character, the choruses and flutes in the German school, and blend to give a musically pleasing result. The strongly characterised Cromorne, the Cornet and the Plein Jeu were heard to good effect, and a truly authentic French sound came forth. On this occasion, as with the theatre at Epidavros, the Greeks have got it right. The Tutti is a thrilling sound, the en chamade trumpets and 32=92 reed crowning the ensemble with panache. The asymmetrical case is devoid of gimmicks, but the battery of horizontal trumpets remind us that this is no commonplace instrument. The De Grigny work was followed by two Chorale Preludes on =93Allein Gott=94 by Bach, BWV 715 and 663, and a fughetta on =93Wir glauben all an einen Gott=94, BWV 681. This is not the better known =93Giant Fugue=94, but another working by Bach of the same chorale. The clarity of line in the Bach trio =93Allein Gott=94 showed organ and organist in harmonious partnership. Each nuance of phrasing and articulation displayed composer, builder and performer=92s art to perfection. Bach left no clue as to the tempo at which his music should be played, and I remember a youthful Gillian Weir playing it at a sparkling allegro at London=92s Royal Festival Hall some 40 years ago. Nicholas Kynaston=92s adopted a more reflective tempo, but such is his innate sense of musicianship and rhythm that there was no doubting the validity of both interpretations. The first half ended with a vigorous performance of Bach=92s G major Fantasy, BWV 572. This triptych, with its central =93Organo Pleno=94 section moved forward with energy and purpose. The chorus work was displayed to splendid effect and the reeds blended with the fluework to create a thrilling rich sound. The second half opened with two works by Bohm. It was interesting to see a repeated 4 note figure in Bohm=92s prelude on =93Vater Unser=94 echoed in Bach=92s =93Erbarm=92 dich mein=94, BWV 721. The chorale was soloed on an exquisitely plaintive hautbois with tremulant. Buxtehude=92s Passacaglia in D minor, the forerunner for Bach=92s masterpiece, led us to the final work in the programme, the Prelude and Fugue in B minor, BWV 544. A fitting climax to a memorable recital, Nicholas Kynaston made full use of the formidable resources of this instrument. Unquestionably one of the world=92s leading organists, Mr Kynaston combines complete mastery of his instrument with innate musicianship, attention to detail, and a virtuoso keyboard and pedal technique, whose true manifestation is a total elimination of unnecessary movement. Taken in combination with a rare ability to communicate the spirit of the music and the composer=92s intentions to his audience, Mr Kynaston is a true ambassador for the organ and its music. The large audience, to most of whom the organ is an unknown quantity, were held spellbound from beginning to end. I noted that the programme was sponsored by the National Bank of Greece. They are to be thanked and commended for their support in this rare aspect of Greek musical life. John Foss Mount Olympus 20th November 2003.     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Line from Plati Kippers   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 17:16:28 EST   In a message dated 11/20/2003 11:00:42 AM Central Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes: I thought that was (architect) Mies van der Rohe. But maybe he was = quoting Goethe.   Alan You could be right. gfc   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Finzi Anthem (off-topic) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 16:21:26 -0600   Hello! I would like to do Finzi's "God Is Gone Up" with my choir at Church this coming Ascension. I am wondering if it is accessible enough to be done by a small church choir that has several really strong singers. Don't you love this piece- shows of a big trumpet really well and has a great organ part overall.   Please respond privately unless you think your response would be of interest to the list.   Blessings, Beau Surratt Minister of Worship and Music United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago Piano Instructor, Hyde Park Suzuki Institute Home Email: Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com Suzuki Email: beausurratt@hydeparksuzuki.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 17:32:25 -0500   To the list: Last year I bought a CD of the Praetorius Mass for Christmas = Morning (Lutheran Mass for Chirstmas Morning as it might have been = celebrated around 1620) The Introit contains the Hymn Puer Natus in = Bethlehem but I cannot find that version in any of my hymn books. The = source is "Polyhymnia Caduceatrix et panegyrica (1619)Musae Sionae V = (1607) Does anyone have this music in one of their hymnals or in their = music library? I would really appreciate a copy if you have it or tell = me where I can purchase it.=20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 6:02 PM Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin     In a message dated 11/19/2003 5:00:23 PM Central Standard Time, = jarmengaud@apsydev.com writes: I am French, if you need some help... ;-)   -Joel Armengaud, France You read my mind! Good of you to speak up! I was going so suggest = finding a French friend (for those of us who are too lazy to order a 12 = dollar book) LOL greg   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Student Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Couperin From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:49:28 -0500   On 11/20/03 5:32 PM, "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> wrote:   > To the list: > Last year I bought a CD of the Praetorius Mass for Christmas Morning > (Lutheran Mass for Chirstmas Morning as it might have been celebrated aro= und > 1620) The Introit contains the Hymn Puer Natus in Bethlehem but I cannot = find > that version in any of my hymn books. The source is "Polyhymnia Caduceatr= ix et > panegyrica (1619) Musae Sionae V (1607) Does anyone have this music in on= e of > their hymnals or in their music library? I would really appreciate a copy= if > you have it or tell me where I can purchase it. > Paul ----- Original Message -----   Is not that the most fabulous Christmas CD ever produced? (And there=B9s a lot of superb competition for that title!)   See the hymntune PUER NOBIS (not Puer natus) in Lutheran Book of Worship, and surely in lots of other books as well.   I THINK I=B9ve hit it right. Almost sure.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Skinner stuff From: "C. Joseph Nichols" <cjn@nicholsandsimpson.com> Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:43:12 -0600   We have some 1921 Skinner stuff listed on www.churchorgantrader.com and = the AIO website, www.pipeorgan.org We will be entertaining all offers.   C. Joseph Nichols Nichols & Simpson, Inc. http://www.nicholsandsimpson.com