PipeChat Digest #4127 - Wednesday, November 26, 2003
 
Re: Re: TAO ad
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
RE: Re: TAO ad
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
RE: A stupid question re Franck
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Past issues of AGO and Clavier magazine free for shipping cost
  by "Fran Walker" <fwalker@northwestern.edu>
RE: A stupid question re Franck
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Dedications of Franck's works
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Franck p.s.
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
A Hybrid Encounter in Michigan (long and xposted)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Presbyterian church fire in Exeter Hew Hampshire
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: wedding rehearsals
  by <FastToccata@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Re: TAO ad From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 06:59:26 EST   >Dear Monty: > >I can feel your exceitment knowing that all is cast in stone. >It would be neat from time to time to see clips and pictures >of the progress. The processes of making the pipes, voicing >etc. but I'm sure you've thought about all that. All the best >with your "Love Child." > >Ron Severin     Ron- Well I am going to be making some trips to Italy to see the organ under construction, so when I make the first trip, I will post some pictures. = At this point, the building hasn't been started yet, they are still doing grading = and all the site prep work on the land. All the streets and parking lots have = been paved on the new land--1.4 miles of streets have been paved over 108.5 = acres of land across the street from our current location. The new sanctuary/offices/family life center is phase one of what will eventually = comprise a village of the church complex, senior citizen housing, low income single family dwellings (Habitat for Humanity type homes), a hospice for the terminally = ill, a community center for afterschool care, etc., etc, etc, all situated on = 108+ acres of land. (The church is trying to purchase more land as it becomes = available) Currently, all the land is paid for--no debt is owed on it. It is going = to be an amazing place--a beacon to the community, a witness as to what God = is doing, and the crown jewel is going to be the Ruffatti in the sanctuary! = :) As a side note, this organ is going to be Charlotte's third 5 manual organ (Calvary Church--Moller, Covenant Presbyterian Church--Aeolian Skinner/Schlicker/rebuilt in 2003 with new 5 man. Turner console by = Mid-Atlantic Organ Company, and I think it's the fourth organ in the city over 100 ranks. Pretty good for = a city that is just beginning to overcome its status as a small town.   Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC    
(back) Subject: RE: Re: TAO ad From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 07:30:41 -0500   Monty: With the explosive value of the Euro against the USD $ I thought it would be a long time before a significant European organ was installed in the US. But I was wrong. Could you tell us what this organ is going to cost in USD$?   Andrew Mead Ontario, Canada   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of RMB10@aol.com Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2003 6:59 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Re: TAO ad   >Dear Monty: > >I can feel your exceitment knowing that all is cast in stone. >It would be neat from time to time to see clips and pictures >of the progress. The processes of making the pipes, voicing >etc. but I'm sure you've thought about all that. All the best >with your "Love Child." > >Ron Severin   Ron- Well I am going to be making some trips to Italy to see the organ under construction, so when I make the first trip, I will post some pictures. = At this point, the building hasn't been started yet, they are still doing grading and all the site prep work on the land. All the streets and = parking lots have been paved on the new land--1.4 miles of streets have been paved over 108.5 acres of land across the street from our current location. The new sanctuary/offices/family life center is phase one of what will eventually comprise a village of the church complex, senior citizen = housing, low income single family dwellings (Habitat for Humanity type homes), a hospice for the terminally ill, a community center for afterschool care, etc., etc, etc, all situated on 108+ acres of land. (The church is trying to purchase more land as it becomes available) Currently, all the land is paid for--no debt is owed on it. It is going to be an amazing place--a beacon to the community, a witness as to what God is doing, and the crown jewel is going to be the Ruffatti in the sanctuary! :) As a side note, = this organ is going to be Charlotte's third 5 manual organ (Calvary Church--Moller, Covenant Presbyterian Church--Aeolian Skinner/Schlicker/rebuilt in 2003 with new 5 man. Turner console by Mid-Atlantic Organ Company, and I think it's the fourth organ in the city over 100 ranks. Pretty good for a city that is just beginning to overcome its status as a small town.   Monty Bennett Friendship Baptist Church Charlotte, NC    
(back) Subject: RE: A stupid question re Franck From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 10:04:01 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   M. Fox wrote: > Hi Glenda (and list)   > According to Smith, the dedication is to Gigout (or Guilmant, or August= a > Holm=E8s). A very tangled tale.   Choral # 1 : a Monsieur Eugene Gigout Choral # 2 : a Monsieur Auguste Durand Choral # 3 : a mon eleve Augusta Holmes (Sorry, folks- my PC has a bug and refuses to make accents, inflections a= nd Umlauts in plain text :)   Yes, Franck mocked about Lefebure-Wely's (and others) rather shallow styl= e a couple of times. He made a caricature of Lefebure-Wely's style with his "Final"- and dedicated it to L. Wely!   IMHPO however the final part of Chorale # 1 isn't a mock... it presents t= he chorale's two main themes in a very different context, building up to a spectacular end.   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Past issues of AGO and Clavier magazine free for shipping cost From: "Fran Walker" <fwalker@northwestern.edu> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 12:55:26 -0600   Dear Folk,   Several weeks ago I offered past issues from about 5 years of AGO magazine =   free to anyone in PipeChat who wanted to pay the shipping cost. BUT - I =   lost my computer hard drive 2 weeks ago and all my email was lost. And = no, we had not backed up recently. So I lost the name/email address of the Chatter who emailed me that he wanted them. It was someone from a bible society, as I remember. So bible society person, could you please email = me again? And the rest of you, if any of you want the issues, why don't you email me too, in case the bible guy doesn't? And as a special thanks to all of you for putting up with me, I am now offering past issues from several years of CLAVIER Magazine free to anyone in PipeChat who will to pay the shipping cost. Some of these a bit water logged from bath tub reading (no, not with wine class in hand, unfortunately) but the content = is there! Last, thanks to those who emailed me suggestions for a new = Advent Introit. I have a whole file to choose from now, thanks to you!   Fran Walker (fwalker@northwestern.edu) Organist, North Shore United Methodist Church Glencoe, IL 847-835-1227 http://www.gbgm-umc.org/northshoreumc/    
(back) Subject: RE: A stupid question re Franck From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 18:37:32 -0600   Andres, thanks but I already knew that much (sounds as if Franck had trouble deciding to whom to dedicate, doesn't it?). I guess I was wondering whether these guys cross-dedicated to each other, thereby sending messages or secret jokes (something I would probably do if I composed very much). I could imagine Gigout and Franck sharing a secret laugh over, or with, L-W, or the like. So I was wondering if there was any documentation, i.e., past diaries or letters, intimating such.   Who was Augusta Holmes?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Dedications of Franck's works From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 16:54:54 -0800   Actually, no, Glenda ... the original Durand edition (the "portrait" one) had the dedications as Franck wanted them. For reasons I forget now, Durand (or somebody) CHANGED them in the newer ("landscape") edition, which most of us play from, unless you're lucky enough to have the original. A number of note errors also crept into the new printing .... I still have David Craighead's errata sheets clipped in the front of one of my volumes.   Cheers,   Bud   Glenda wrote:   > Andres, thanks but I already knew that much (sounds as if Franck had > trouble deciding to whom to dedicate, doesn't it?). I guess I was > wondering whether these guys cross-dedicated to each other, thereby > sending messages or secret jokes (something I would probably do if I > composed very much). I could imagine Gigout and Franck sharing a secret > laugh over, or with, L-W, or the like. So I was wondering if there was > any documentation, i.e., past diaries or letters, intimating such. > > Who was Augusta Holmes? > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Franck p.s. From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 17:06:10 -0800   The DUPRE edition of Franck is ok if you want to copy fingering or pedalling from it ... I use Dupre's pedalling for the pedal runs at the end of Grand Piece Symphonique ... but pay NO attention to Dupre's registrations. He and Langlais had a great battle about that once upon a time ... Langlais had the registrations from Tournemire, who had them from Franck himself, and Langlais was RIGHT; Dupre was WRONG (chuckle).   In defense of Dupre, though, it could be argued that Franck WOULD have used some of the sounds Dupre indicated if he'd HAD them at Ste. Clothilde ... the Ste. Clothilde organ in Franck's time was not very large or very complete by Cavaille-Coll standards; and we know that some things ... Piece Heroique, Grand Piece Symphonique WERE registered for the larger organ at the Trocadero.   In particular, Franck's Recit and Pedale were weak ... there was no 8' Diapason in the Recit ... that accounts for him constantly calling for the Fonds et Hautbois in the Recit. Evidently there wasn't enough Pedale 16' ... that's why he calls for coupling the 16' stop of the Grand Orgue to the Pedale.   Tournemire (I believe it was) had the organ enlarged, only to discover to his utter HORROR that stuffing those additional reed stops into the Recit box caused them to fight and cancel each other out ... I'd guess the work was done by Mutin, C-C's successor ... he SHOULD have known = better.   So ... that brings us back to the question: do we do what Franck SAYS, or do we do what he's likely to have been hearing in his head?   Not quite the same question as "If Bach had a Tuba, would he have used it," (grin), since those sounds DID exist in larger C-C organs all over Paris.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: A Hybrid Encounter in Michigan (long and xposted) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 20:13:29 -0500   Good day to All, I titled my subject line as such for 2 reasons. First, to courteously deter those who find digital sound abhorrent, from even opening this report. Secondly, to establish what made this experience unique for me. I have heard live performances of instruments that contained digital pedal ranks before, but had never heard one that contained a mix of digital voices and pipes in all the main divisions, plus one complete division of all digital voices. It would be safe to say I was prepared not to like such an instrument due in large to what I have learned on this, and other organ chat lists, but the fact that Felix Hell would be at the console of this hybrid gave me far greater incentive to satisfy my curiosity, and justify the 350 mile round trip it would require to hear it.. St. John's Armenian Church in Southfield Michigan has a striking yet rather stark sanctuary that is an octagon. It has 8 equal sized bays formed by the supporting interior arches which are the foundation for a massive rounded dome which is painted gold on the outside, and is visible for miles around. I would estimate the height from floor to top center of the dome to be around 60 feet. There is not a bit of padding anywhere. The floors are marble, the arches concrete, and the outside walls are concrete block left stark and visible. The acoustic is most generous. One of the bays houses the main alter, and the 2 flanking bays hold the clergy and choir rooms above whose roofs are mounted exposed, most of the organs flue work in tiered flower box fashion. It is visually striking. If you are looking for them, one can also see parts of the speaker boxes mounted behind the pipe work peeking through. They look to be plentiful and large. There is also at least one expression chamber behind the right bay pipe work, though I did not notice the shutters moving until well into the second half of Felix's program. The console is situated to the right side of the alter bay at floor level such that the performer is literally amongst the pews. Those who sat in the pews directly behind Felix got the opportunity to witness his marvelous technique up close, but had to sacrifice hearing the organ from its best acoustic position. I met up with Hans Hell before the concert, and he quickly clued me in on the best place to sit, about half way back on the center isle. I'm sorry I cannot offer you the exact specifications for this organ. It is not for lack of research that I have not found it anywhere on the net or otherwise. A general description includes the original 1969 Tellers 2/24 pipe organ which was augmented several years ago with a Rodgers console increased to 3 manuals, the third controlling a new Choir Division which is completely digital. The additional digital stops are reported to have increased the stop count 3 fold. It is interesting to note also that Lance Luce, famed theatre organist and organ consultant, was directly responsible for this instrument through its installation and finishing. I was happy to have the opportunity to meet him, and I thanked him sincerely for the fine work he did here. I must report with all candor that this instrument sounds superb to me. I quickly found myself putting all digital prejudice aside, and simply enjoying the fine sonic experience that Felix created. This was my first time hearing Felix's "Barber Adagio for Strings" in live performance, and must admit to wet eyes during his rendition. It was beautiful beyond words, and the string tone coming from the digital Choir was more convincing than any pipe string tone I had ever heard. I heard violins, violas, cellos, and basses in chorus with the pipes, and the experience was sensational. Felix brings such sensitivity to this wonderful piece, and this organ played its part with equal passion. I was deeply moved. Anyone who has attended a Felix Hell concert knows he programs his performance masterfully. He began with the familiar Bach "Prelude and Fugue D Major to establish his ground, and quickly moved into "O Mench bewein dein Suende gross" to sort of soothe us before the next 2 major concert pieces. Felix Mendelssohn "Sonata No. 1, F Minor is a gigantic work, yet Felix tosses it off with well rehearsed skill and form. If you had not heard him play it before, you might wonder how it could ever be eclipsed, yet he immediately moved into the Franz Liszt "Consolation D flat Major" and "Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H". Thus ended the first half of the program, and the audience (who had been reined in to hold applause until that point by the clergy) erupted immediately into an standing ovation that required Felix to take 2 curtain calls, and it was just half time. As is my habit at Felix's concerts, I enjoy circulating through the groups of audience members during intermission to eavesdrop on the conversations. I heard one senior member of the church ask his partner when did they add all the extra stuff to the organ, because he had never heard it sound like that. Another proclaimed loudly that this was the first time the organ had ever really "stood up", and it wouldn't stand up like that again until Felix came back. The CD sales were brisk during the intermission. Felix began the second half with Mozart's "Fantasy F Minor" to dazzle us again, and then moved into the Samuel Barber "Adagio for Strings" which I previously described my rapture for. The final work on his program this night is near and dear to me, for I heard the Guilmant "Sonata No. 1 D Minor" as an organ symphony in Hamilton Ontario during the Brott Music Festival with Felix at the console accompanied by a complete symphony orchestra. I have since heard Felix perform the Organ Sonata version several times on different instruments, and I never fail to be amazed at hearing all the organ and all the orchestra parts being performed by a single artist. I suppose the phrase "he owns this piece" might be a bit over used, but I assure you, he owns me when he plays it. The "Final" movement of the Sonata is quite vigorous and grand, so we got the chance to hear everything the organ had to offer. Felix's face was positively alight as he reached for the last unpulled stops, and mashed the crescendo pedal to the metal. The sanctuary was rather dark you see, and the draw knobs on the Rodgers console were of the "light up" variety. I'm sure he was having great time as well. The full organ was quite satisfying and filled the sanctuary with a full and glorious bloom of sound along with the deep rumble of 32' up through the seat of your pants vibrate the whole building kind of ending. The applause began before Felix released the chord, and everyone was on their feet immediately. After several curtain calls Felix returned to the console for his encore which began with the "Adagio" from Widor's "Symphony No. 4 in F Minor" and then the famous "Toccata" played with his usual lightning tempo. Again the audience roared it's approval with all standing. After several more curtain calls, Felix moved off to the church lobby where he greeted everyone who wished to speak with him, and Hans kept busy doing a land office business in CD sales while answering questions like "are you very proud of him?", and "does he get straight As in school?". Since I was standing beside Hans at the point I fielded this last question. Felix will graduate from college in May at the age of 18, and you certainly don't do that if you're a B or C student. As I headed home to Cleveland after receiving my final embrace each from Hans and Felix, (I feel so very lucky to be so honored by them each time I see them) I reflected on my first live experience with a hybrid organ. Perhaps I'm too biased by the joy of hearing Felix perform, but I don't think so. I've heard enough performers play enough different instruments at this point, that I think I have learned sufficiently to determine when an organ sounds good or bad. Let me say simply that the music that came from this particular Rodgers installation was plenty good enough to take the digital prejudice completely out of the picture. I thoroughly enjoyed what I heard, and isn't that after all the measure of a quality musical experience. Granted my ear is not as experienced as some of the harsher critics of hybrid technology, but I am no longer prepared to dismiss an instrument off hand if it contains digital ranks, simply because certain organ folks tell me I should. My agenda is simply music enjoyment, and I no longer care about the package it's wrapped in. If it sounds good, I'll return to it. If it sounds bad, I'll learn from it. But I will never again allow myself to be bullied by politics or labels placed in front of me by those who would portend to instruct me about what I should or should not like. Will I support pipe organs in the future? You betcha. Will I support hybrids in the future? I will deal with that on an instrument by instrument basis. Will I support all digital instruments? That will be a new frontier for me that I am no longer afraid to explore. Thanks to Felix for a wonderful concert experience, and along with Hans, for their warm fellowship. I now can't wait for Spivey Hall and the mighty Ruffatti on December 21. I also wish to congratulate Lance Luce and Rodgers Organs on a splendid installation that is completely sensitive to the Tellers pipe work, while expanding the capabilities of the instrument to best serve the St. John's community and their marvelous church building.   Cheers Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Presbyterian church fire in Exeter Hew Hampshire From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2003 22:05:52 -0400   here is a link to the news about a church fire in New Hampshire http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/2661645/detail.html    
(back) Subject: Re: wedding rehearsals From: <FastToccata@aol.com> Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2003 00:35:32 EST   I know this topic has been finished, but I am behind in reading emails.   Before I meet with the couple to plan the music for the ceremony, I have = them sign a contract and send me a retainer amount. I try and figure out how = much time I will be putting in and add a small cushion. Whatever isn't used, I =   return to them the following week after the ceremony, along with an = itemized statement showing how the monies were used. What I have started to do is = charge a straight fee just for the wedding ceremony itself. The rest including rehearsal time, rehearsing with any musicians, talking with the couple as = to what they would like played for their wedding, etc., I charge them an hourly = rate which they know how much an hour that will be upfront. This has worked = out really well, and the rehearsals don't keep going on and on. They know the = time will cost them money!