PipeChat Digest #4131 - Friday, November 28, 2003
 
New Organ for Lausanne - by C.B.Fisk
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: Economy of motion
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
18th cty barrel organ 08
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve>
Economy of Motion
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
IRC Reminder
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
RE: Dedications of Franck's works
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: New Organ for Lausanne - by C.B.Fisk
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: New Organ for Lausanne - by C.B.Fisk
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
wedding fees & motion
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
midisport
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
Country weddings
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Economy of motion
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Time delay
  by "Richard M Washington" <richard@sulgrave.clara.net>
Re: Time delay
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
Re: midisport
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Time delay
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: New Organ for Lausanne - by C.B.Fisk From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 05:40:01 -0500   You may be interested in reading an article from the Lausanne Journal, - go to the following URL;   http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/28/international/europe/28ORGA.html   A new organ, bu an American Organ Builder, indeed   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: RE: Economy of motion From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 08:51:27 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   *Economy* is exactly the reason because organ performers should sit quiet (not stiff!) at the console. My organ instructor didn't say "don't move" = but "don't waste your energy with unnecessary fussing. Put all your energy in playing".   Cheers Andres        
(back) Subject: 18th cty barrel organ 08 From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agun@telcel.net.ve> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 09:25:46 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve   18th cty barrel organ part 08 (last part)   So said. As I mentioned at the beginning, no marks, stickers, labels or inscriptions are conserved. Too many "second criterion restorations" [See the "Intermezzo installment"] had been made, too many cooks had had the hands in the pottage. John R. Watson explains in an excellent and comprehensive essay how every intervention which increases the functional condition of an historic artifact decreases its documentary condition at = the same time [Bibliographic reference below]. We lost contact with Mr. Foussard.   In early 2001 it became clear that the ancient roller was dying. With = every turn, more of the tiny brass pins broke, and the termites had damaged the wood too much. I agreed with Enrique Cupello to manufacture some new = rollers of Mahogany wood, one of them with the original melody (be it a test = melody or an opus from Cosineau, Nademan, Krumpholtz or whoever- but certainly = not from Haydn or Mozart!), and two or three with pieces from Haydn's "Floetenuhr" and some venezuelan tunes- we have a lot of nice waltzes in = our repertoire which would sound fine on a barrel organ or a Band Orchestrion.   There is a problem, however. After all the organ is linked to a clock; and it's supposed that the melody is automatically played at a certain moment. But: when? Every hour, every 12 hours, every 24 hours? - The melody lasts approximately seven minutes. Judging by this it could have been played = once in 24 hours... but this can not be considered a definitive statement until clock movement and organ are linked and working together again. The new rollers are finished, but I won't start to "pin" them (this is a Megaheck = of a work) until I am not sure in advance what is exactly needed. But the restored clock case and movement (the latter mounted on a provisional base board) were brought back to La Casona in early 1998 meanwhile Enrique Cupello got a tech for the barrel organ. At mid 2001 = money began to get scarce and ominous dark clouds started to darken the = political horizon. The black prophecies that our country could become a second Cuba seemed to become true after all. April 13 2002 there was a coup attempt; December 2002 to February 2003 a violent strike. Both had nasty = consequences for our homeland's economy and peace, not to mention the increased = security and access restrictions to the President's Residence since then.   The unique barrel organ stands in a corner of my shop waiting for better days to come. Is it really so unique, however?- Recently I found a photograph of an almost identical barrel organ like "ours" in a 'Past vs. Now' ad of a digital barrel organ manufacturer. New questions arise then: = Is the "Napoleon Clock" Barrel organ an early mass manufacture product?- If: Where was it manufactured, and by whom? Prospective answers would change again the whole history.   Meanwhile from time to time I make a cleanup and set it in motion, = listening to the mysterious melody... wondering if we ever will know for sure if the clock belonged to or was manufactured by Louis XVI; how many court balls, 'affaires galantes' and quarrels it may have witnessed; if Napoleon Bonaparte stood in front of if watching its time; if the organ ever played tunes by Cosineau, Nademan, Krumpholtz, Haydn or Mozart. The most interesting side of restorations is precisely that we never get told everything at once from the devices we are restoring, but every time we = give them a "pass over" or ruffle through the files and records there is a new exciting clue which leads to new and exciting questions... and sometimes = the devices plainly prefer to keep a veil over their past.   The End (for now :) =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Bibliography: John R. Watson, "Performance standards meet museum standards: the conservation of pipe organs" (from: "Towards the Conservation and Restoration of Historic Organs - A Record of the 1999 Liverpool = Conference" [Church House Publishing, UK], page 67 - 84)   Other Bibliographic References: Karl Bormann, "Orgel- und Spieluhrenbau", Sanssouci Verlag, Zurich, 1968 Karl Bormann, "Heimorgelbau", Verlag Merseburger, 1972 Dom Bedos de Celles, "The Art of the Organbuilder" (german transl. by Christoph Glatter-Goetz), Orgelbau-Fachverlag ISO-Information 1977 Laurie Penman, "The Clock Repairer's Handbook", David & Charles, UK 1996 Larry Givens, "Rebuilding the Player Piano", The Vestal Press, NY, 1979 R. Andres Gunther, "The Barrel Organ from the "Napoleon" Grand Father = Clock in the Presidential House 'La Casona' " (unpublished report) ....and the Thick, Heavy Folder in Andres' Gunther's Workshop Archives (hopefully soon available in .ppt format :)      
(back) Subject: Economy of Motion From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 07:46:45 -0600   Hello, PipeChatters: Regarding: > Economy of motion-I think Lemmens was WAY into > that. Follow the lineage. It is a concept that > is applied by the best musicians on all instruments > (except for piano anyway :). ....and the key question: > Why make extra motions and gestures, especially > contrived ones? To put on a show? To make look > like your really doing something hard? It's a > waste of time, and gets in the way of the music, > and can even prevent someome from playing right > notes. I've puzzled about this quite a bit, and landed on one theory that might make sense. When a woodwind, reed, string, or brass player moves his body gently with the rhythm of the music being played, there subtle doppler shifts in the pitch of the notes. This adds a certain amount of movement to the tone, something our ears perceive and our brains seem to enjoy, especially more than an absolutely straight tone. Perhaps the objection is "excessive" movements added to the presentation of music by players with those instruments. A pipe organ or E-org does not move like that, except for the Leslie and Allen roto speakers. Pianos do not move. Celestas and harps do not move, but instruments held by individual players can certainly create these subtle tonal transitions with the random motion of the player. One fellow jokingly said, "The use of an occassional arm movement to drop onto a large chord makes me appear more spiritual." Then he grinned to confirm his jest. Can't offer any reason for the frantic movements of rock and roll players/singers on stage. <grins> F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: IRC Reminder From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 07:59:40 -0600   Just a quick reminder that the PipeChat IRC group will be meeting this evening, as ti does every Monday and Friday evening, beginning at 9:00 PM EASTERN time.   If you need instructions on how to connect with the group please go to http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   Hope to see some of you there tonight   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Dedications of Franck's works From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 08:45:50 -0600   Franck was sort of like Elgar in his name-dropping, eh?   The Dover is a facsimile of a Durand edition - which?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Andr=E9s G=FCnther   Bud told some things which I really didn't know. I have the "landscape" Durand- my instructor told me "Franck in Durand only, please- it's the *original* edition!" As for the dedications, they are a "who is who" of Franck's most influential contemporaries in the french organ world...        
(back) Subject: Re: New Organ for Lausanne - by C.B.Fisk From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 11:40:11 -0500   on 11/28/03 5:40 AM, Bob Conway at conwayb@sympatico.ca wrote:   > You may be interested in reading an article from the Lausanne Journal, > - go to the following URL; > > http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/28/international/europe/28ORGA.html > > A new organ, bu an American Organ Builder, indeed > > Bob Conway     It's also in the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/28/international/europe/28ORGA.html     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: New Organ for Lausanne - by C.B.Fisk From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 13:08:05 -0500   Sorry, that was really stupid for me to have posted the NY Times url a second time, after Bob Conway already did! Anyway, it is a great story.   With egg on my face,     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: wedding fees & motion From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 13:04:12 -0600 (CST)   If an organist is lucky enough to have a position where the church pays wages that are fair and comparable to say what a florist gets for their services, I can see not being paid for weddings of parishioners. However, most organists are not paid as much as say a plumber and certainly not in accord with what a florist charges, or what couples pay for the limo to drive them to the reception. Too often churches have not developed adequate stewardship in their members and do not pay fair wages. The grave underpayment of organists is the reason for wedding stipends. Also, how many couples take the music or even the ceremony as seriously as the details of the reception? Maybe a hefty music fee would help change that...just a thought.   Second topic. I do not appreciate being distracted by unnecessary motion by any musician. Too often I've seen excessive movement give the illusion of musicality. In such cases, I've avoided watching players to concentrate on what really is happening in the music. Certainly some movement makes sense if it physically helps the instrumentalist. In the case of organists, there is no purpose served in extraneous movement...flaying arms will not make the organ play louder :) Sure, stay relaxed and be comfortable - even look like you're enjoying the music. But again, "bobbing and weaving" only fools the player and, most importantly, the audience into thinking something musical is happening.    
(back) Subject: midisport From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 13:05:16 -0600   Thurletta;   I am running a 700mhz G4 iMac with system 10.3.1 (panther)(but I used the same setup on Jaguar too)   I am successfully using the midisport 1X1 with Finale (and before that, Allegro) and OMS software for the studio set-up. I'm using a Kawai MP9000 keyboard.   One problem that I experienced was, I somehow managed to install 2 copies of the OMS software and drove the Mac (and myself) crazy for a week before I deleted both and installed a clean OMS copy. Use the Studio-setup wizard for OMS and do not check either 'modem' or 'printer' when it asks -- just continue.   Most important -- perhaps you already know this -- you MUST boot OS9 -- you cannot operate Finale in OSX running the OS9 shell. You actually need to go to system preferences and select 'start-up disk' and choose the icon representing system 9 and then re-boot. Only then will finale operate successfully. (note -- you should be in system 9 when you do your installation and set-up) When you are finished -- if you want to return to OSX -- you need to go to the 'apple icon' on the menu bar and chose 'control panels' and then 'startup disk' and choose the icon for system X and re-boot again.   This is a pain-in -the-a**, but the folks at SmartMusic promised me that this would be solved in their new version for OSX which is to ship December 25.   Best of luck. If you have more questions you can email me directly and I will help you IF I CAN. I really a much better organist than computer-geek, but I manage...     Larry Wheelock Director of Music Ministries Kenwood United Methodist Church Milwaukee, Wisconsin musicdirector@kenwood-umc.org  
(back) Subject: Country weddings From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 13:59:15 -0600   Ah, the smell of country weddings!   Last week while making my rounds at the courthouse I ran into a good friend of mine, another attorney with whom I have passed acquaintance since high school days. His name has recently gone up with three others (two others who are also friends) as nominees to the governor for the imminent vacancy in the local circuit judgeship.   After exchanging pleasantries and information about the status of the governor's appointment process for the judicial position, he surprised me by asking me how would I like to play a wedding the day after Thanksgiving. "Yeah, sure, I have nothing better to do over the holidays," was my joking reply.   Turned out he was serious - one of his cousins (and this man has more cousins than the Pope has bishops) with whom we had both gone to school was getting married, her second. She wanted him to sing Malotte's 'The Lord's Prayer', and otherwise a traditional service, replete with Wagner and Mendelssohn, to which the minister had no objection. Wedding was to be at "the Presbyterian church" at 2:00 p.m. on Friday.   I said OK, not a problem, then forgot about it. I had played the Malotte many times in my youth. But then Sunday I went to my music armoire and started plundering. I had always played the Malotte in D flat major for soprano types, never for a baritone/bass. And I did not know whether she wanted the processional/recessional music on the organ, although she requested soft piano music for prelude.   Monday during a break in the action of a CLE course in Pensacola, I made my way to a music store and found a book with TLP in every published key, for organ or piano. What a find, I thought. The sales clerk informed me that there was such a book for the 'Ave Maria's and 'O Holy Night'. I should have asked if it was available for the 'Panis Angelicus'.   As an aside, I also took a few minutes Monday afternoon to drop in at Trinity Presbyterian Church, Pensacola, to see the new Taylor and Boody organ being installed. They had just played their first service on it the day before. Only about half the stops were installed and working, but it had a pretty oak case and swell shutters, and looked nice in the room. Otherwise, at this point in time it was hard to judge - I'll get to see and hear it about May.   Tuesday afternoon before closing I thought that maybe I should go over to the Presbyterian Church and see if I could gain access to the organ and mark registration. I knew the church had a two-manual Rodgers in a cavernous room. So I called over, and what to my surprise when I found out there was no wedding scheduled on Friday at 2:00. However, there was a wedding down at the Valley Presbyterian Church for Friday at 11:00.   I called my friend and asked him to verify location and time, and as of Wednesday evening I hadn't heard from him. Oh, well, I thought, maybe I won't have to do this.   I cooked the Thanksgiving Day meal for a grand total of 3 - my mother joined Rick and me. We did smoked turkey, mashed potatoes, steamed broccoli and cauliflower, baked sweet potatoes, and cranberry sauces with rye bread. I cheated and did Stove-Top Stuffing and Boston Market gravies - hey, I was tired.   I had finally packed my mother off home with leftovers, washed dishes and sat down in the loft resting, when the phone rang. It was my friend - the Valley church was open. Did I want to meet him to do a run-through? It was 3:50, and I promised to meet him there at 4:30. (How does the movie "Auntie Mame" end? I missed it.) By the way, the wedding was at 11:00 the next day.   The Valley Presbyterian Church was organized in 1828 in the heart of Walton County, a community called Eucheanna and the original county seat. The church replaced its original log building with a new edifice around 1848, described in historical records as a large frame building, 50' by 100', with large and commodious inside galleries on either side, and seating 400-500 people. Sometime this century the building was razed and replaced by a small unassuming squarish wooden building, sans galleries and other quaint architectural features. I don't know if there is any record of past organs.   It is the type church one would expect to find a respectable Moller or Erben. Alas, it was not to be. I already knew this, for I had been called on to "consult", for lack of better word, when the church was trying out a Rodgers electronic a couple years ago. Church members requested that I play for them so that they could judge whether they wanted to buy this organ. Being a somewhat competent and flamboyant organist at the time, I played Mendelssohn Sonata I, some Schumann and Bach, and the consensus was that everything was "too loud". I tried several hymns and soft pieces - Whitlock, Bach, Reubke, don't remember what else - but the organ was not to their liking, even at its softest settings. I didn't like it either (this place needed a pipe organ, or something that sounded better than what I was playing - this instrument could not be matched with the building and acoustics). My playing was probably not their usual recipe, but it was well known at that time that my music cabinet was not much in the line of Southern Protestant. I suggested that they try several other brands before buying, and gave them contact numbers and offered my future assistance if needed.   On my drive down to the church to meet my friend, I hoped that they had decided on an organ of some sort. However, they had stuck with their old 1960s parlor Wurlitzer, no full manuals or pedalboard, and little buttons to push for "sounds". I thought, "This is worse than the Hammond at the 1928 prayer book church for the wedding I did a couple years back," and my price tag for this gig was about to shoot from $0 to $500. I was on the verge of offering canned music. The alternative was a little Baldwin spinet piano on the other side, and we decided to play everything on that.   The fellowship hall had a brand new Yamaha of fine timbre, but I had guessed that the Wurlitzer and the Baldwin were gifts of a sacramental nature, and would probably only be removed from the church by a blazing conflagration. In fact, a parishioner told me that it was a major battle just to have centralized heat and air conditioning installed, and one or two old members quit over the fracas.   Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus, and yes, Shelley, I played the Pachelbel 'Canon in D', one of my most hated pieces. I also did the standard lay favorites: 'Jesu, joy of man's desiring', the Wagner and Mendelssohn. I threw in the centerpiece of Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu No. IV (knowing they would throw me out as being pretentious if I did the whole thing), and had more Chopin and Sibelius lined up in case the bride was not timely (make 'em suffer by feeding them classical music - if I had more advance warning, I would have polished up the Rachmaninoff and Ravel and Debussy). During the lighting of the blasted unity candle, we did the Malotte, which went well, although I had to concentrate to keep my fingers playing in B-flat and not revert to their comfortable rote of the D-flat. My soloist also speeded up on me in performance, which made for great fun. However, he is a fine singer.   Afterward I was given an envelope full of crisp $20 bills. A little in shock, I felt as if I had just completed some kind of crack cocaine deal, but was pleased that I had done a friend a favor and at the same time concluded a second paying gig this year. Politely declining the invitation to the wedding luncheon while pictures were being snapped, I headed home to a turkey sandwich, wondering how I managed to score these times of innocuous intrigue. Fun in the big city.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Economy of motion From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 20:29:44 +0000 (GMT)   You may not have read the review I wrote last week of Nicolas Kynaston's recital in Athens - or skippped through it! Nicolas Kynaston was a student of Fernando Germani and Ralph Downes (as was I of the latter.) They both insisted on economy of motion. To quote my review - "Unquestionably one of the world=92s leading organists, Mr Kynaston combines complete mastery of his instrument with innate musicianship, attention to detail, and a virtuoso keyboard and pedal technique, whose true manifestation is a total elimination of unnecessary movement." This article of faith has a long history amongst most truly great instrumental players - though Fats Waller used to move around a bit! John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Line from Plati Kippers   ________________________________________________________________________ Download Yahoo! Messenger now for a chance to win Live At Knebworth DVDs http://www.yahoo.co.uk/robbiewilliams  
(back) Subject: Time delay From: "Richard M Washington" <richard@sulgrave.clara.net> Date: Wed, 1 Jan 1997 01:59:54 -0000   Hello,   I've been following the list for a week or three now, and thought it was = about time to contribute. I'm starting with a question. In fact, = questions will be a common theme I think, as you shall see.   I am really a pianist at present, but have recently had the urge to try = my hand at the organ. I have arranged regular practise time on a 32 stop = 3 manual 1875 Gray and Davison organ with 1953 remote electric console = added by I forget who. Tonally, I believe the instrument remains largely = true to the original design. The organ, as far as I can gather, doesn't = seem to get any other regular use, and is consequently rather the worse = for wear. No matter, I still enjoy its sound, and perhaps I will be able = to persuade the owners to lavish a little more maintenance upon it, one = day.   That is the background - now for my question. While the organ is located = in the gallery on the west wall of the church, the console resides more = to the east. Consequently there is a very distracting time delay between = playing the notes and hearing them. I would be grateful to any list = members who could shed light on a speedy way to overcome this problem, = although I rather suspect lots of practise is the answer.   Another possibility that comes to mind would be that of using a = (generally redundant) MIDI synthesiser of mine, routed through my PC = somehow to simulate the delay. I could therefore put in extra practice = at home to help overcome my difficulties. Does anyone here know if this = can be done?   Thanks to anyone for their help.   Regards,     Richard Washington UK.  
(back) Subject: Re: Time delay From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 16:09:36 -0600   Here's an idea, based solely on logic, and nothing else. Is it possible to =   mic the organ up close, and route the sound through headhones. That would eliminate the delay, but may be irritating to hear both the sound from the =   headphones, and the delayed sound outside of the headphones. You wouldn't get any expeirnece in working with a delay, but if you need proficiency in = a pinch, it might work.   Thinking off the top of my head...     Mike Franch Madison, WI     >From: "Richard M Washington" <richard@sulgrave.clara.net> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Time delay >Date: Wed, 1 Jan 1997 01:59:54 -0000 > >Hello, > >I've been following the list for a week or three now, and thought it was >about time to contribute. I'm starting with a question. In fact, = questions >will be a common theme I think, as you shall see. > >I am really a pianist at present, but have recently had the urge to try = my >hand at the organ. I have arranged regular practise time on a 32 stop 3 >manual 1875 Gray and Davison organ with 1953 remote electric console = added >by I forget who. Tonally, I believe the instrument remains largely true = to >the original design. The organ, as far as I can gather, doesn't seem to = get >any other regular use, and is consequently rather the worse for wear. No >matter, I still enjoy its sound, and perhaps I will be able to persuade = the >owners to lavish a little more maintenance upon it, one day. > >That is the background - now for my question. While the organ is located = in >the gallery on the west wall of the church, the console resides more to = the >east. Consequently there is a very distracting time delay between playing =   >the notes and hearing them. I would be grateful to any list members who >could shed light on a speedy way to overcome this problem, although I >rather suspect lots of practise is the answer. > >Another possibility that comes to mind would be that of using a = (generally >redundant) MIDI synthesiser of mine, routed through my PC somehow to >simulate the delay. I could therefore put in extra practice at home to = help >overcome my difficulties. Does anyone here know if this can be done? > >Thanks to anyone for their help. > >Regards, > > >Richard Washington >UK.   _________________________________________________________________ Say =93goodbye=94 to busy signals and slow downloads with a high-speed = Internet connection! Prices start at less than $1 a day average. https://broadband.msn.com (Prices may vary by service area.)    
(back) Subject: Re: midisport From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 17:03:26 -0600   I'm using Finale 2003 in OSX running the OS9 shell with a MidiSport 2x2 - no problems at all. Now I can't say the same for my Mark of the Unicorn programs!   Russ   I On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 01:05 PM, Larry Wheelock wrote:   > Most important -- perhaps you already know this -- you MUST boot OS9 > -- you cannot operate Finale in OSX running the OS9 shell. You > actually need to go to system preferences and select 'start-up disk' > and choose the icon representing system 9 and then re-boot. Only then > will finale operate successfully. (note -- you should be in system 9 > when you do your installation and set-up)    
(back) Subject: Re: Time delay From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 17:13:13 -0600   Richard, I understand your problem completely. I was a pianist for 14 years before switching to organ and I used to find it difficult to cope with the delay also. I think it just takes time to get used to it. Remember to keep hearing what you are playing in your mind, and to KEEP GOING. Eventually you will get used to it, but beware, the next instrument that you play may have a longer or shorter delay that you will have to learn to cope with.   I know this may not be possible, but if you have any way to play on a tracker instrument, it is MUCH easier to start there so that you don't have as many adjustments at once.   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"