PipeChat Digest #4132 - Saturday, November 29, 2003
 
Re: Economy of motion (was Re: Book of fiction about organist)
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Re: Time delay
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4131 - 11/28/03
  by <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com>
Re: midisport
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: Economy of motion LONG
  by "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
To Weave or Not To Weave
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: To Weave or Not To Weave
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Organ shoes and music
  by "Joe Karashani" <jtkarash@coppernet.zm>
Re: Organ shoes and music
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Economy of motion (was Re: Book of fiction about organist) From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 19:58:57 EST   Dear List and to all whom this may concern:   I would like to make a few points in this letter. First I would like to = say that Eric Clapton (whoever that is) is indeed one of those fools that just =   jumps around and plays three chords, like my good friend gregory had = mentioned. Indeed, this has nothing to do with organ music, though whether or not one = can see a persons face has NOTHING to do with music. To hear someone mention people like Todd Wilson, Gillian Wier, Fred Swann, Jane Parker-Smith, and = John Weaver, and say that they would throw away a ticket just because they = didn't move around, its just, well...horrible! If people would only take the = time to sit back, close their eyes (if necessary) and listen, and I mean LISTEN, = to the music, then whether or not the performer moves around like they are going = to take off like an airplane, will not matter. I must say that indeed the = economy of motion is very important, as previously mentioned by many list members. = I myself make as little movement as possible when playing. I also remember hearing Fred Swann. This indeed was truly a concert to remember. He did = not move an inch at the console and sat perfectly still. I even watched him = most of the time just to observe, and though he did not move an inch, by God as my =   witness, it was one of the finest musical performances I have ever heard, = AMEN! So, I hope this enlightens a few people, as music has nothing to do with motion of the body. Alas, I am probably just wasting time and breath = because unfortunately to most in America, the organ is an entertainment = instrument. It's a shame that more people couldn't be more musically mature, though that is = just the way it is, I presume. I did not mean to offend anyone, or attack = anyone personally in this message, as this is not directed to one specfic person = or a group or people. I am just saying this, as I know people can misconstrue things, etc. However, I felt very compelled to write it, as stuff like = this just gets on my nerves. I ask that all of you have a blessed Holiday Season = and a Happy New Year as well...and as always, keep practicing!!!   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music and Organist St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017   In a message dated 11/28/03 5:02:17 AM Eastern Standard Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: Subject: Re: Economy of motion (was Re: Book of fiction about organist) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2003 14:28:10 -0500   > > And outside the organ world, has anyone > ever seen Eric Clapton play guitar? One of > the most interesting aspects of a Cream or > Blind Faith concert was that those > thousands of wailing, shrieking, thundering > guitar notes were coming from this guy > standing stock-still on stage moving just > about nothing except his fingers. MAF > Hello Michael, Your example ignores the fact that the audience can see Clapton's face. The emotion of the music need not be contrived or exaggerated. Most organ performance denies the audience the performer's face, so we depend upon body movement and posture for those signals, no mater how subtle. I can't argue with economy of movement because I'm not an organist. As an audience member, I can tell you I appreciate expressive performers provided it's done with good taste. I have seen Felix perform many more times than any other organist because he creates a far more satisfying musical experience than any other performer I've heard. My home turf is Severance Hall where I've held season tickets to the organ series for the past 3 years. Severance attracts world class performers the likes of Tom Murray, Fred Swann, John Weaver, Simon Preston, Gillian Weir, Jane Parker-Smith, James O Donnell, and Curator, Todd Wilson. Yet I've been known to give away my tickets to go hear Felix play a small tracker 120 miles away. You can argue my reasons all you want, but Felix's stage presence and personality always guarantee I will come away far richer. So, keep your movement economical if you must, but don't delude yourself that you are doing the audience any favors. And be prepared to be pigeon holed on the popular recitalist list, particularly if you can't seem to keep your dance card filled. When I pull the wishbone today, I will not be wishing for more wooden, expressionless, passionless recitalists.   Happy Thanksgiving Mike Gettelman    
(back) Subject: Re: Time delay From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 16:59:22 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Our aural perceptions are remarkable, and work with pin-point accuracy. If I recall my psychology correctly, hearing takes up a quite large area of the brain, and the "signal processing" is extremely sensitive and complex. (I want to come back as a dolphin!)   More importantly, we "hear" selectively. Think of the crowded room syndrome, where there are glasses chinking together, people babbling away (both near and far) and perhaps music thrown in for good measure. Then in comes someone we know well and speaks in a normal tone from across the room. We recognise the voice straight away.   This, I believe, is called cognitive hearing.   As musicians, we use the same skills when we play an instrument, but there is a learning curve. One of the real horrors of giving recitals, (as I used to do quite frequently when they were more popular) is to arrive late after a delay, have just enough time to try one or two things through, and then attempt to give a performance. I have one of these on tape, and it is interesting listening.   At first a bit lacking in co-ordination, the whole thing gets better and better as time goes on, until by the end, it is quite coming together. This was on an instrument with a decrepit pneumatic action, in which the larger off note chests spoke much slower than the rest, and where the pedals were literally "all over the place". To make matters worse, none of the four manuals reacted even remotely similarly, and that caused its own special problems. Add to this, the nightmare scenario of an action which worked more promptly at the treble end than it did at the bass end of each keyboard, and you begin to get the overall picture.   So how did I manage to co-ordinate it all?   The answer is, I have no idea! However, it is clear that, as we "learn" an acoustic, and learn an action, we can make compensating movements given time....this is why the recording is so interesting.   Now take another nightmare scenario, a large, romantic west end organ, and a large all male choir a city block away at the east end. This is what I once faced regularly when accompanying daily evensong and Sunday services alike; sometimes with a congregation of a few at the east end, and sometimes with a nave quite full.   Because I knew the organ, the acoustic and the delays involved, we could perform quite complex accompanied music, and for anyone in the nave area, it all sounded perfectly co-ordinated. The reality is, I accompanied as much as a full measure ahead of the choir sound which fed back to me, but somehow, we met in the middle of the church quite happily.   Good hearing is a wonderful thing, but cognitive hearing is nothing short of miraculous!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Alicia Zeilenga <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> wrote: > Richard, > I understand your problem completely. I was a > pianist for 14 years > before switching to organ and I used to find it > difficult to cope with > the delay also. I think it just takes time to get > used to it   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now http://companion.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4131 - 11/28/03 From: <OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 20:07:46 EST   I must say that I have not been following this posting, however the Wayne Leupold edition is a facsimile of the Durand edition, and it also contains = a wealth of other helpful information, from the layout of the console to the =   specification and much, much more. Hope this helped!   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music and Organist St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017   In a message dated 11/28/03 8:00:15 PM Eastern Standard Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes: Subject: RE: Dedications of Franck's works From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 08:45:50 -0600   Franck was sort of like Elgar in his name-dropping, eh?   The Dover is a facsimile of a Durand edition - which?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com    
(back) Subject: Re: midisport From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 18:26:33 -0800   I'm also running Finale 2003 while booted into X, using the OS 9 shell. I have a Roland MIDI/USB doohickey, and it works just fine. I'm looking forward to Finale 2004 for OS X, though!     On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 03:03 PM, Russ Greene wrote:   > I'm using Finale 2003 in OSX running the OS9 shell with a MidiSport > 2x2 - no problems at all. Now I can't say the same for my Mark of the > Unicorn programs! > > Russ > > I > On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 01:05 PM, Larry Wheelock wrote: > >> Most important -- perhaps you already know this -- you MUST boot OS9 >> -- you cannot operate Finale in OSX running the OS9 shell. You >> actually need to go to system preferences and select 'start-up disk' >> and choose the icon representing system 9 and then re-boot. Only then >> will finale operate successfully. (note -- you should be in system 9 >> when you do your installation and set-up) > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Economy of motion LONG From: "Douglas A. Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2003 21:39:58 -0500       On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 13:35:33 EST Gfc234@aol.com writes: You read my mind-sort of. If you really want to take it further-look at all those idiotic pop guitar players who play the guitar (and other instruments) really hard, arms flying around to pluck the strings, jumping etc...to make people think its really something, when it reality, they are playing 3 chords over and over, and a pentatonic scale (they only know one or two of these at most), and have NO command over the guitar at all. Then take a look at Wes Montgomery, Grant Green, John Coltrane, Elvin Jones (drummer), all the great classical guitarists too....these people are playing mind blowing music-and are just sitting there, sqare and calm-cool as a cucumber, almost as if they are meditating. They make it look easy. There need not be anything theatrical about it-its music, not acting class.     In regards to the playing of Felix Hell.............Felix is quite animated when he plays. For those of you who have never been to one of Felix's concerts -- there is no justification / explanation I can give. For those of you who HAVE seen (and heard) Felix play -- there is no explanation necessary !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: To Weave or Not To Weave From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 00:31:37 -0500   Dear Chris and List,   While this topic has perhaps got a bit drawn out, with rather polarized = points of view, I would like to throw in some thoughts from my = experience. First, I need to confess that I am a weaver. (Sorry John! - = no relation.) I don't contrive to do it, and certainly not for any kind = of effect - it just happens, although certainly not in the extreme.   My first Organ study was with an Oberlin student who wanted to try his = hand at teaching. I was not enrolled in the Conservatory, but I was = studying piano with the saintly Emil Danenberg, and was around the = practice rooms quite a bit. (The place had 111 Steinway grands in those = days.) The student was very earnest but neither inspired nor inspiring, = so after a year of him, I explained that I had really appreciated his = efforts, and he had so inspired me that I had decided to register for = Organ performance in the Conservatory. My teacher was to be Fenner = Douglass, but he would be away on sabbatical for a semester, and I would = be studying with a very good man called Richard Hudson. One of his = missions seemed to be to do something about rigid, unmusical = performances, and to that effect, he started his students not at the = Organ, but sitting in a chair with score in hand. While we were studying = the score, we were asked, as we scanned the music, to react physically = to it in an almost balletic manner. He played this way, very beautifully = in fact, and that may have started me moving in reaction to the music, = or it might have been something I would have done anyway - I don't know. = When Fenner returned, I really don't think he had much if anything to = say about physical motions, but when I got to Juilliard and Vernon de = Tar, I heard lots! He discussed much of what we have heard in various = postings over the last few days - a concern for unnecessary movements. I = believe I did manage to cut down on movement quite a bit, but I suspect = there may be still more left than some would like.   I have seen performers who are totally still, and therefore most = efficient, but whose playing strikes me as terrifically musical. I have = also seen efficient but deadly dull players. One of the former types = struck me particularly at the OHS convention in North Carolina a couple = of years ago. That was Bruce Stevens, whom I had heard many times, but = always off in a balcony somewhere and totally out of sight. He played in = that convention on a console front and center. From this absolutely = still person, hardly a motion, came playing of the most glorious = musicality. It was a wonderful performance. And there is, as has been = mentioned, Felix, who does move as he plays, and the way he does it = really paints a visual picture of the values, tensions and releases of = the music he is playing, and I do believe that often, it does help = people to "get it." I don't believe he has made a conscious choice about = movement, but is, rather, doing what happens to him naturally. So, in a = way, I guess the answer is that there really is no answer - only what is = right for the player.   As for those gyrating rock musicians . . . . .   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com =20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: OrgelspielerKMD@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 7:58 PM Subject: Re: Economy of motion (was Re: Book of fiction about = organist)=20     Dear List and to all whom this may concern:   I would like to make a few points in this letter. First I would like = to say that Eric Clapton (whoever that is) is indeed one of those fools = that just jumps around and plays three chords, like my good friend = gregory had mentioned. Indeed, this has nothing to do with organ music, = though whether or not one can see a persons face has NOTHING to do with = music. To hear someone mention people like Todd Wilson, Gillian Wier, = Fred Swann, Jane Parker-Smith, and John Weaver, and say that they would = throw away a ticket just because they didn't move around, its just, = well...horrible! If people would only take the time to sit back, close = their eyes (if necessary) and listen, and I mean LISTEN, to the music, = then whether or not the performer moves around like they are going to = take off like an airplane, will not matter. I must say that indeed the = economy of motion is very important, as previously mentioned by many = list members. I myself make as little movement as possible when = playing. I also remember hearing Fred Swann. This indeed was truly a = concert to remember. He did not move an inch at the console and sat = perfectly still. I even watched him most of the time just to observe, = and though he did not move an inch, by God as my witness, it was one of = the finest musical performances I have ever heard, AMEN! So, I hope = this enlightens a few people, as music has nothing to do with motion of = the body. Alas, I am probably just wasting time and breath because = unfortunately to most in America, the organ is an entertainment = instrument. It's a shame that more people couldn't be more musically = mature, though that is just the way it is, I presume. I did not mean to = offend anyone, or attack anyone personally in this message, as this is = not directed to one specfic person or a group or people. I am just = saying this, as I know people can misconstrue things, etc. However, I = felt very compelled to write it, as stuff like this just gets on my = nerves. I ask that all of you have a blessed Holiday Season and a Happy = New Year as well...and as always, keep practicing!!!   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter, SPC Director of Music and Organist St. Paul's Lutheran Church Bethlehem, PA Cell: (610) 462-8017    
(back) Subject: Re: To Weave or Not To Weave From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 01:55:18 EST   I agree with Malcolm:   First and foremost when listening to a live concert, my first judgment is to listen for musicality. Next comes technique. If musicality and technique are in balance and secure, I let the music carry me away. If they are not secure, I'm on edge. It makes little difference to me whether the performer moves or not. I judge how the music flows, and it's essential beauty.   Those who past on organ playing technique to me through the line begins in France with J. Lemmon, who taught, Lynwood Farnum, who taught Clarence Mader, to Ladd Thomas, To Esther Jones, to me. We don't move anymore than is necessary. There are also those who do move. I personally see no particular reason to criticize whether the performer moves or not. The question is, do they make music, is it beautiful and does it move your soul. That's really all that really matters.   The performer brings to the music his/her personality which hopefully is beyond center away from ice to fire. Some people are naturals, others work much harder or seem to. The genius paints with all colors and brushes producing subtleties, and nuances in the music beyond even the written score.   Sincerely,   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Organ shoes and music From: "Joe Karashani" <jtkarash@coppernet.zm> Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 09:21:24 +0200     Dear list members   I have been a lurker for the most part but enjoy very much reading the various postings. I am visiting Washington DC in the coming week (for a medical conference) and would like advice on where I can purchase (1) Organmasters shoes (and the approximate cost) and (2) Gleason's organ = tutor and other organ music books.   Joe Karashani Cathedral of the Holy Cross Lusaka, Zambia      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ shoes and music From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 02:34:24 EST   Contact http://www.organmastershoes.com   I imagine they can work out something for you. They are incredibly = wonderful folks.   I defer to the others on the list for information on purchasing books.   Neil Brown