PipeChat Digest #4034 - Wednesday, October 1, 2003
 
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hymn Tunes
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: Scary phone call
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net>
Quick! Help! Please!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Pedalling and Compton's
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Quick! Help! Please!
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Emanule Cardi in Lancaster PA
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Emanule Cardi in Lancaster PA
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
Re: Scary phone call
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Charles Wesley/1812 Overture
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
DENNIS JAMES - ANNUAL AUTUMN NORTHWEST TOUR
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Test
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Charles Wesley/1812 Overture
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Quick! Help! Please!
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Quick! Help! Please!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Celeste
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 04:57:11 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I'm going back a bit, but I had a fine Mk2 XJ6 with a 4.2 until it got hit by big Rover. The Rover was destroyed and the Jag drove away!   Actually, the thought of speaking Spanish in the jungle, whilst being chased by a big cat somehow doesn't ring true.   Unless of course it was, "Jagu.......aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh!"   Regards,   Colin   --- MusicMan <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> wrote: > Hi, Colin, > > ....... and I've just bought one ......... and the > "gas-guzzler" 4 litre at > that !" > > But at least we pronounce the word Jaguar the way it > should be (for the car, > that is - maybe, in the depths of the jungle, a > touch of Spanish might be > acceptable as the feline version approacheth). > How can 'our American brothers' get SO many words > 'tongue-tied' ? From > oregano to tomato / potato. > No wonder 'their' diapasons can sound different to > 'ours'. > > Harry > [a.k.a. musicman] > > -----Original Message----- > From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: 29 September 2003 16:45 > Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" > > [Edited] > > Hello, I once had a Jaguar! (Colin Mitchell) > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Tunes From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 07:00:20 -0500   Good Morning, David, et al: Thank you for compiling the lists of favorite hymns and hymn tunes. I pulled the materials together in one list and printed them. My wife is one of the secretaries in our church music department and she will present these to the rest of our music staff this morning. Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt Dorian ORgans ..  
(back) Subject: RE: Scary phone call From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 10:03:43 -0400   Andres Gunther agunther@cantv.net   > "Does the pastor realize you need canons firing off in church > to complete the score?" > > How about a creative alternative to canons?   If the organ has an Orage, no problem :)   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.            
(back) Subject: Quick! Help! Please! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 09:59:02 -0500   I can't find my copy of "O taste and see" by Vaughan Williams. I usually leave it near the computer for unknown reasons, but cleaned up the armoire and put it in a safe place. Now I can't find it.   I may actually have put it in the music cabinet, where it belongs, but that is a scary thought. Can anyone give me the text real quick? I know, it's short and I should know it off the top of my head, but I go blank so quickly these days.   Thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: Pedalling and Compton's From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 10:06:18 -0500   Do you mean like 3-inch tiny-diameter heels?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Walter Greenwood   Hi, all. Exactly, John. I just spent Sunday and Monday evenings with Dame Gillian, and she made ample use of both heels in all the Bach she played, including trio sonatas, the Vivaldi/ Bach a minor, and even the Adagio from the C major T,A,&F. Monday evening she was wearing spikes! Her presentation for the guild meeting was all about rhythm, attack and release, staccato and legato, and how balancing these makes all the difference between exciting music and deadly-dull.        
(back) Subject: Re: Quick! Help! Please! From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 12:59:51 -0400   O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: Blest is the man that trusteth in him. Ps. 34, 8   Is there any piece of music more beautiful than this?   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   On 10/1/03 10:59 AM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > I can't find my copy of "O taste and see" by Vaughan Williams. I > usually leave it near the computer for unknown reasons, but cleaned up > the armoire and put it in a safe place. Now I can't find it. > > I may actually have put it in the music cabinet, where it belongs, but > that is a scary thought. Can anyone give me the text real quick? I > know, it's short and I should know it off the top of my head, but I go > blank so quickly these days. > > Thanks. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Emanule Cardi in Lancaster PA From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 13:07:15 -0400   Italian organ Emanuele Cardi will appear at Grace Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA, on Sunday at 4 p.m. His program includes mov'ts 1, 5, 6, and 7 of Symph 8 by Widor; Mendelssohn Sonata 4 in B-Flat; Bach Prelude and Fugue in G, ("Great"), BWV 541; Fantasie in F, K. 594, and Andante in F, K= .. 616, by Mozart, and two Sch=FCbler chorales.   The organ is a 3/54 Schlicker of 1967 with new principal chorus (wider scale, better pitch definition, etc.,) in the Great and digital (Walker) 16= ' and 32' Bourdons in the pedal. Hermann Schlicker would hardly recognize th= e sound, save of the R=FCckpositiv, which is original and wonderful. It's one of the better organs and organ-music venues in this area of Pennsylvania.   There is a light meal (free) afterward with opportunity to talk with Cardi, who is fairly fluent in English. He concertizes all around Europe, but I do not know to what extent he's played in the United States or Canada= ..   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Emanule Cardi in Lancaster PA From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 13:38:54 EDT   It is interesting that he is not playing any Italian music. Speaking of Italian organists-is anyone familiar with Stefano Innocenti? His playing = is v. fine!    
(back) Subject: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 13:16:10 -0500   WEDNESDAY NOON RECITAL   LUTHER MEMORIAL CHURCH Madison, Wisconsin   Bruce Bengtson - organ   October 1, 2003   Fantasia sexti toni Christian = Erbach Fuga secundi toni (c. 1570-1635)   God with us / eleven pieces for organ Emma Lou Diemer (published 1994) Precious Lord, take my hand What a friend we have in Jesus Amazing Grace   Messe Basse Louis Vierne V. Communion (1870-1937) VI. Sortie   _________________________________________________________________ Instant message during games with MSN Messenger 6.0. Download it now FREE! = http://msnmessenger-download.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 13:36:20 -0500   I suppose that a few cannons during advent would remind everyone that the Prince of Peace is still in the coming! Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:56:48 -0400 Subject: Re: Scary phone call   > I like Bud's idea, - but does the organ have cannons? > > Now if he could find a couple of starters pistols and let them go at > the > appropriate moment he might be in business. (Or out of a job!) > > Or perhaps a couple of well timed fireworks might do the trick! The > mind > boggles at all the possibilities! > > Bob > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: <quilisma@cox.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2003 3:49 PM > Subject: Re: Scary phone call > > > > Just play a verse or two of "God the Omnipotent" (Russian Hymn) on > the > > full organ, and aim the cannons at the pulpit <EG>. > > > > Bud > > > > Charles Peery wrote: > > > > > Your advice, please?! > > > > > > On my answering machine is a message from our new associate pastor. > > > Early 30's, smart, likes classical music. This summer he switched > over > > > from Church of the Nazarene to our United Methodist conference, and > was > > > appointed to us by the Bishop. The message concerns his desire for > me > > > to play the 1812 Overture on the organ in conjunction with a sermon > he > > > wants to do in November. Or December. (which made me wonder if he > knows > > > that's ADVENT.) > > > > > > Is there an organ transcription of this piece? I don't own one, > and if > > > there's no published arrangement, that might be my out. If I say I > > > don't play secular stuff in church, then what if he hits me with > > > Lohengrin and Midsummer Night's Dream? Or, could I say that the > > > dramatic effect of trying to do this on the organ would be comedic > and > > > is that what he intends during worship? > > > > > > What would you do? What should I say? Thanks in advance. > > > > > > Chuck Peery > > > Cincinnati > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Charles Wesley/1812 Overture From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 15:06:58 -0400   The plot thickens. I summarized the points people made and presented both the positive and negatives. To those of you who said "Do it, a little comedy never hurt": he wasn't thinking comedy. He was thinking Cecil B. DeMille. He was thinking of the emotional impact of the music with no knowledge of what is actually happening in the piece programmatically. (Battle scenes? competing national anthems?... this hadn't even entered his mind). His point was that if HE didn't think of anything except the rising triumphant tide of the emotions, nobody in the congregation would either. And then he said, "When Charles Wesley et. al. put Christian lyrics to known folk tunes, was the effect on the listeners/singers productive in turning their hearts to Christ through familiar connections, or counterproductive in turning their minds to the tavern piano and their tastes to their ale?" Now, I know that it's commonly said that Martin Luther used drinking tunes for his hymns (an anecdotal fluffery that does not pan out when one checks it out.) But what about Charles Wesley? I mean, I don't know my history well enough to say for sure.. but... is this also one of those myths?   Chuck Peery Cincinnati    
(back) Subject: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 15:38:13 EDT   Scott Smith writes today:   >My point is that we need to focus on putting the music FIRST. To dyed-in-the-wool types, the concerts are either about the organ, or the = performer, (or the cookies) and the music is oftentimes incidental. We promoted and = produced this event knowing full well what the outcome would predictably be. Still, = we did it, hoping we could draw some new faces to the Grand Ledge Opera = House   Hi Scott,   Just read your post about the opening concert at the Grand Ledge and = thought I'd write first to mention I'd stopped by to see the installation a few = weeks ago when I was in the area to play a 4 performance run of my organ & = orchestra PHANTOM OF THE OPERA silent film show with the Detroit Symphony at the Detroit Opera House. I was in Grand Ledge because my brother, Rodger = James, lives there and mentioned to me that the Michigan Theatre Barton ended up in his =   town's preserved opera house. It certainly looks like a marvelous = installation and, considering your post today, one that is quite well supported.   Since theme programs without emphasis on the player seems to be what = you're series programmers are looking for, I thought I'd mention my latest = touring "Theatre Organ Jazz!" tribute program. I play authentic note-for-note transcriptions of historic recorded arrangements by such famous theatre = organ players as Fats Waller, Milt Herth, Shay Torrent, Don Baker, Al Bollington, and Lew White plus my own organ & piano arrangements of jazz pieces by Bix = Beiderbeck, Zez Confrey, George Gershwin, Jelly Roll Morton and Willie 'the Lion' Smith. Available for media-equipped sites are slide and/or 16mm film = illustrations as extra options to enhance the program presentation.   "Theatre Organ Jazz!" will debut at the Auditorium Theatre in Rochester, = NY on March 13, 2004, and I'm recording elements of the program shortly = afterwards for the Fox Theatre (Atlanta) management for their latest CD project featuring the Moller. I'm booked next season already to present the = concert program at the Wurlitzer at the Phipps Center in Hudson, WI in the 2004-2005 = season with the date still to be selected (a fine opportunity to coordinate = travel for a program at the Grand Ledge Opera House next season). I'll also be = presenting it during my Australia (Perth, Adelaide and Sydney) & New Zealand = (Auckland and Christchurch) tour in late 2004.   If you'd like to book it in for the Grand Ledge series, let me know. = It'll be great to play the Barton in its new home- you'll recall our last presentation together of PHANTOM OF THE OPERA when it was still at the = Michigan Theatre in downtown Lansing!   Dennis James 7095 Hollywood Boulevard, #483 Hollywood, CA 90028-8903 USA Phone: 323-883-1514 E-mail: muscur@aol.com          
(back) Subject: DENNIS JAMES - ANNUAL AUTUMN NORTHWEST TOUR From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 15:38:16 EDT   Dennis James and his Silent Film Concerts will be on his annual autumn = tour in the Northwest throughout October and on into November. These authentic =   programs utilize archival 35mm theatrical prints of each film whenever = available. These are shown at the original historical exhibition projection speeds, = in appropriate image formats and with he surviving complete original scores = or recreation scores utilizing historical scoring materials.   October 7- 7:00 p.m. Everett Theatre 2911 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 425.258.6766 2003 Mystery Series: John Barrymore in DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE   October 13- lecture at 7 p.m., film at 7:30 p.m. Paramount Theatre 911 Pine Street Seattle, WA www.theparamount.com Silent Movie Mondays series: Paul Leni's THE CAT & THE CANARY starring = Laura La Plante   October 14- 7:00 p.m. Everett Theatre 2911 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 425.258.6766 2003 Mystery Series: Paul Leni's THE CAT & THE CANARY starring Laura La Plante   October 20- lecture at 7 p.m., film at 7:30 p.m. Paramount Theatre 911 Pine Street Seattle, WA www.theparamount.com Silent Movie Mondays series: Louise Brooks in PANDORA'S BOX   October 21- 7:00 p.m. Everett Theatre 2911 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 425.258.6766 2003 Mystery Series: Louise Brooks in PANDORA'S BOX   October 26- 2:00 p.m. Everett Theatre 2911 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 425.258.6766 2003 Mystery Series: PHANTOM OF THE OPERA   October 27- lecture at 7 p.m., film at 7:30 p.m. Paramount Theatre 911 Pine Street Seattle, WA www.theparamount.com Silent Movie Mondays series: PHANTOM OF THE OPERA   November 3- 2:00 p.m. Everett Theatre 2911 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 425.258.6766 2003 Mystery Series: Buster Keaton in SHERLOCK, JR. plus Laurel & Hardy in = DO DETECTIVES THINK   For more information, contact:   Dennis James - Silent Film Concerts 7095 Hollywood Boulevard, #483 Hollywood, CA 90028-8903 USA Phone: 323-883-1514 E-Mail: muscur@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Test From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 16:01:02 -0400   Disregard:   Running AOL Mail anywhere 4.5 to correct problems with pipe chat. I have loaded netscape 7.1 for this e-mailing.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: Charles Wesley/1812 Overture From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 16:25:06 -0400   "When Charles Wesley et. al. put Christian lyrics to > known folk tunes, was the effect on the listeners/singers productive in > turning their hearts to Christ through familiar connections, or > counterproductive in turning their minds to the tavern piano and their > tastes to their ale?" Now, I know that it's commonly said that Martin > Luther used drinking tunes for his hymns (an anecdotal fluffery that > does not pan out when one checks it out.) But what about Charles > Wesley? I mean, I don't know my history well enough to say for sure.. > but... is this also one of those myths? > > Chuck Peery > Cincinnati >   It is a myth in both instances. Read on: From: http://www.wfn.org/2002/08/msg00102.html   From the Worldwide Faith News archives www.wfn.org ------------------------------------------------------------------------   Music expert debunks myth that Wesleys used drinking songs ------------------------------------------------------------------------ From NewsDesk <NewsDesk@UMCOM.ORG> Date Tue, 13 Aug 2002 14:19:30 -0500       Aug. 13, 2002 News media contact: Linda Green7(615)742-54707Nashville, = Tenn. 10-71BP{365}   NOTE: An artist's rendering of John Wesley is available at http://umns.umc.org/photos/headshots.html.   A UMNS Feature By Linda Green*   An oft-heard myth about the Methodist tradition is that founders John and Charles Wesley used drinking and tavern songs as the melodies for hymns.   "The Wesleys did no such thing," says the Rev. Dean McIntyre, director of music resources at the United Methodist Board of Discipleship in = Nashville, Tenn. "Given their aesthetic and theological sense, it would (have been) unthinkable for them to do so."   However, the popular misconception has survived among Methodists, and a similar myth is often heard about Martin Luther, the reformer who was also = a musician. The mistaken belief about the Wesleys often arises when people talk about how the brothers proclaimed the gospel in the public places, where people gathered, according to McIntyre. Pastors, musicians, worship leaders, composers and hymn writers continually voice the misconception.   McIntyre decided to set the record straight after returning from this summer's jurisdictional and chapter convocations of the Fellowship of = United Methodists in Music and Worship Arts. At each event, someone referred to = the "long-held and oft-repeated untruth that John and Charles Wesley made use = of tavern or drinking songs as tunes for their texts," he says.   He adds that some people have used the myth as an excuse for importing secular influences into worship.   McIntyre says the legend began when a seminary or music student became confused over the musical term "bar tune" or "bar form" - a medieval = pattern for poetry consisting of three or more stanzas - which became the pattern for songwriting. Someone with no knowledge of medieval poetry heard "bar form" in connection with John Wesley, and the songs became tavern songs, = he says.   The "bar form" term is still used by songwriters today. The popular "Over the Rainbow" is written in this form, as are all of the classic blues. The bar form is most commonly used in hymns and folk songs, and a number of = bar tunes accompanying text written by the Wesleys and Luther are found in the United Methodist Hymnal. Those songs include:   7 "A Mighty Fortress is Our God," UMH 110. 7 "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," UMH 139. 7 "Come, thou Almighty King," UMH 61. 7 "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross," UMH 298. 7 "Praise the Lord Who Reigns Above," UMH 96. 7 "Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus," UMH 196. 7 "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling," UMH 384.   "I feel called to set the record straight," McIntyre says. "It is not difficult to understand how the musical term 'bar form' also referred to = as 'bar tune,' can be confused in an uninformed person's mind with a barroom tune, drinking song, or some other title to indicate music to accompany = the drinking of alcoholic beverages."   The Wesleys' instructions for singing their songs are found in the front = of the United Methodist Hymnal. The most important, McIntyre says, are = passages that admonish singers to "Be no more afraid of your voice now, nor more ashamed of it being heard, than when you sung the songs of Satan" and to "Above all, sing spiritually."   "Wesley's aesthetic to above all sing spiritually simply would not allow drinking songs to accompany hymn texts," McIntyre says.   "In no hymn book or other publication of the Wesleys can there be found = any example of or encouragement to use drinking songs to sing hymns," he says.   The deeper issue is that people have used the Wesleys as an "excuse for importing the secular music culture into worship," he says.   "Whether Wesley did or didn't use drinking songs is not really the issue," McIntyre says. "Rather, the issue is why Wesley did not did not use them." Noting that Wesley found drinking songs unacceptable, he asks if = worshippers today should use music from the local bar for worship. "If Wesley's reasoning for the Methodists of his time remains valid for our own, then = the answer is no."   He suggests that those who "justify" the use of secular culture and influences in United Methodist worship by repeating the Wesley legend "should be called to account."   McIntyre delves into the issue in the board's online site at http://www.gbod.org/worship/default.asp?act=3Dreader&item_id=3D2639. # # # *Green is news director of the Nashville, Tenn., office of United = Methodist News Service.   ************************************* United Methodist News Service Photos and stories also available at: http://umns.umc.org     ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Browse month . . . Browse month (sort by Source) . . . Advanced Search & Browse . . . WFN Home      
(back) Subject: Re: Quick! Help! Please! From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 16:38:15 -0400   O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: blest is the man that trusteth in him. O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: blest is the man that trusteth in him. O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: blest is the man that trusteth in him. --Psalm 34.8     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu           on 10/1/03 10:59 AM, Glenda at gksjd85@direcway.com wrote:   > I can't find my copy of "O taste and see" by Vaughan Williams. I > usually leave it near the computer for unknown reasons, but cleaned up > the armoire and put it in a safe place. Now I can't find it. > > I may actually have put it in the music cabinet, where it belongs, but > that is a scary thought. Can anyone give me the text real quick? I > know, it's short and I should know it off the top of my head, but I go > blank so quickly these days. > > Thanks. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 19:28:36 EDT   In a message dated 10/1/2003 2:39:59 PM Central Daylight Time, = MUSCUR@aol.com writes: Jelly Roll Morton and Willie 'the Lion' Smith. Available for = media-equipped sites are slide and/or 16mm film illustrations as extra options to enhance = the program presentation. Here is a bit of vulgar trivia-do you know where Jelly Roll got his name from??? hint: -it ain't the pastry    
(back) Subject: Re: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2003 19:37:36 -0400   On 10/1/03 7:28 PM, "Gfc234@aol.com" <Gfc234@aol.com> wrote:   > Here is a bit of vulgar trivia-do you know where Jelly Roll got his name > from??? hint: -it ain't the pastry >=20 OK, I=B9ll bite.   Ah, well, cautiously.   Where did Jelly Roll get his name from?   Still cautiously.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Grand Ledge Opera House - x-post From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 20:07:06 EDT   In a message dated 10/1/2003 6:39:04 PM Central Daylight Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes: OK, I=E2=80=99ll bite.   Ah, well, cautiously.   Where did Jelly Roll get his name from?   Still cautiously.   Alan=20 From the female organ he loved so very much. He played in New Orleans=20 brothels, was known to drink alcohol by the jug, and slept with the working=20 girls-all as a YOUNG man sneaking around his mother's back.    
(back) Subject: Re: Quick! Help! Please! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 17:33:45 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Yes......   Try "Hymn to the virgin" by Britten   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Karl Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> wrote: > O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: > Blest is the man that trusteth in him. > Ps. 34, 8 > > Is there any piece of music more beautiful than > this?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Celeste From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 21:26:59 -0400   Good evening chatters!   If anyone has/knows the location of a soft string and celeste, or Erzahler and celeste, please let me know! (C:   = -Nate   "The traveling apprentice"