PipeChat Digest #4045 - Friday, October 10, 2003
 
Re: Ornamentation in Walther
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: REHEARSING WITH ORGAN AND SINGING FLAT
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Challenge grant
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Re: Ornamentation in Walther
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
RE: Ornamentation in Walther
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Ornamentation in Walther
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Ornamentation in Walther
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Kyrie by Rustichelli
  by "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net>
Re: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
OHS 2005 correction
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Popular music played on non-theatre organs
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Popular music played on non-theatre organs
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Today's Organ
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: Today's Organ
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Jose Lidon
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
small romantic organs
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Jose Lidon
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
re: singing flat
  by "Steve Gilson" <sgilson@sympatico.ca>
Re: SINGING FLAT
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com>
Re: Jose Lidon
  by "AJ" <AJ1995@cox.net>
Concert or recital
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Walther From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 13:35:39 EDT   In a message dated 10/9/2003 12:09:15 PM Central Daylight Time, eadams@cinci.rr.com writes: Dear Chatters,   As a young student in the late 60s and early 70s I pretty much put ornamentation in Baroque music where my teachers told me to. I'm aware now (a) a lot of this is subject to personal and/or editorial interpretation = and (b) notions change from one decade to the next as to what is seen as appropriate for the time the music was written.   At any rate, in the process of reconstructing a music library after not playing for a long time, I've come into possession of a collection of J.G. Walther chorale preludes in a late 1940s Concordia edition. This music = looks like someone took handsful of mordants, inverted mordants, trills and = turns and just liberally sprinkled the pages with them. There's no rhyme or = reason I can see to a lot of the placement and in many cases it seems extremely excessive.   I don't have a specific question, exactly--since I'm not actively studying right now I'll probably just use my own judgment and edit a lot of this stuff out. I'd welcome some general discussion of the topic, though. I think you ought to get the new Breitkopf and Hartel edition. If not, = play what you think is right in the Concordia. Edit out, but also feel free to = add ornaments, in an improvisational style-it was common practice in the = Baroque era. good luck, gfc    
(back) Subject: RE: REHEARSING WITH ORGAN AND SINGING FLAT From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 13:46:09 -0400   To make this thread on-topic, what do you all recommend by way of = registration when you must accompany a rehearsal on the organ, and do = you think it's a good idea at all?   Some choirs are more comfortable ending a rehearsal by singing their = upcoming anthem(s) through in the church with the organ. I'm basically = o.k. with that, although it may be a slight waste of time except for a = major event or an especially difficult piece. In this case one would = register and play the organ as it would be for the performance.   But I've always felt that the neither the church nor the organ provide = good conditions for an entire rehearsal and would do all I could to = obtain another place for them to practice, with a piano, even if it = couldn't be a room permanently set aside for the choir.=20   If you must use the organ for an extended rehearsal, what registrational = or other tips can you suggest to make the most out of the situation? It = *seems* to me that brightening up the registration with 2' stops tends = to improve the choir's intonation if they are singing flat. In fact, = I've sometimes told them that if they unexpectedly hear such a = registration (like flute 8' principal 2') in a performance, they should = take it as a warning that they are out of tune and should listen more = carefully.   I also generally accompany the choir more quietly than some organists = would, feeling that (1) the most important thing is that people should = be able to hear the words; (2) alas, I am usually confined to such = mediocre repertoire that the organ part seldom contributes much = musically, anyway. When it does, then, yes, it makes a nice contrast to = solo it out. (3) it's good for the choir to listen to one another more = than to the organ. Sometimes they complain that they can't hear it, and = I might say "good! You're doing just fine without it." And tell the = congregation that one of the advantages of joining the choir is how = variety is the spice of life: you can wish that the organ were louder = instead of softer :-)          
(back) Subject: RE: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 14:06:44 -0400   > That's a fabulous (very encouraging) report. Is the church "downtown" = near busy sidewalks and stuff? Where do all those people COME from? I'm = quite impressed.   Luther Memorial is not in the center of town, like on the capitol square = where grand ol' Grace Episcopal is; but in general terms, yes, it is = downtown, oh, maybe 10-15 min. walk from the capitol. It is on = University Ave, a busy and important arterial to the west, and directly = across this avenue lies the U. of Wis. campus.   It may be even better for a recital series like this than in the very = center of town, because parking is probably easier. (Does the church = have a sizeable parking lot of its own?) Even as a little kid 7-8 years = old living in Madison in the 1950s, I heard that businesses on the = square were having a difficult time. I couldn't understand this at that = age, because the neighborhood always seemed to be bustling with traffic. = Indeed: everyone crawling at 15 mph between traffic lights, and = probably at least half of the drivers circling around forlornly looking = for a place to park.   It was great to move, at age 6, from a mill town of 7500 people to = Madison, which is widely regarded as one of the most exciting cities of = its size in the U.S. I have no doubt that this was true then, as well. = My piano teacher, Mrs. Paxton, was the organist at Luther Memorial in = those days.          
(back) Subject: Challenge grant From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 14:55:25 -0400   I mentioned a while back that Tom Murray was going to play a recital at St. Ann & the Holy Trinity in Brooklyn Heights, NY. He has done so, to the usual acclaim. I wasn't present, but it was Tom Murray and nothing more need be said, I'm sure. Since then I have been informed that the tuba en chamade on that instrument ( E. M. Skinner) was originally in the expressive solo division before being placed on top of the chamber. It has now been restored to the Solo division.   Anyway, I am informed that as a result of the recital, a $10,000 challenge grant has been given to the church for restoration of the instrument. It is a wondrous beast and most worthy of full restoration, for sure, and if any list members are interested in contributing or more information, email me privately. The present curator has taken care of the instrument for at least 25 years, so we talking true restoration, not "restoration"; you know what I mean.   David Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Walther From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 15:15:44 -0400   At 01:07 PM 2003-10-09 -0400, you wrote: >Dear Chatters, > >As a young student in the late 60s and early 70s I pretty much put >ornamentation in Baroque music where my teachers told me to. I'm aware = now >(a) a lot of this is subject to personal and/or editorial interpretation = and >(b) notions change from one decade to the next as to what is seen as >appropriate for the time the music was written. > >At any rate, in the process of reconstructing a music library after not >playing for a long time, I've come into possession of a collection of = J.G. >Walther chorale preludes in a late 1940s Concordia edition. This music = looks >like someone took handsful of mordants, inverted mordants, trills and = turns >and just liberally sprinkled the pages with them. There's no rhyme or = reason >I can see to a lot of the placement and in many cases it seems extremely >excessive. > >I don't have a specific question, exactly--since I'm not actively = studying >right now I'll probably just use my own judgment and edit a lot of this >stuff out. I'd welcome some general discussion of the topic, though. > >Emily A.   Emily,   Sounds like you have a very editorialized edition.   I believe that ornamentation should be done in a sane manner, should be comfortable to execute, spontaneous if possible, and done in a manner that =   preserves the melodic or thematic scheme of the piece.   Too many performers do a very contrived style of ornamentation, which is wearisome to listen to. Also performers like Ton Koopman, for all his brilliance, over ornaments, which is distracting.   The problem too, is that scholarship on this subject changes rather frequently. Yesterday's yea yea is today's nay nay.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: RE: Ornamentation in Walther From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 15:27:10 -0400   Arie Vandenberg writes:   > The problem too, is that scholarship on this subject changes rather=20 frequently. Yesterday's yea yea is today's nay nay.   Even as a graduate student, I never felt very knowledgeable or confident = about ornaments. I had owned and consulted Donington's _Interpretation = of Early Music_, which was reputable; but then my teacher, Jerald = Hamilton, was a fan of Frederick Neumann, who often differed. So whom = is one to believe?   Are these two still considered reliable authorities nowadays, or have = others taken their place?    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Walther From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 12:41:51 -0700   "Less is more"   "The good taste of the organist is the final arbiter"   All else is conjecture (chuckle).   The supposedly "urtext" Church Organist's Golden Treasury LITTERS the Walther pieces with ornaments. If they sound good, I play them; if I CAN play them, I play them (grin); if they DON'T sound good, I DON'T play them; if I CAN'T play them (without spending endless hours on a 5-10-minute partita), then I DON'T.   Cheers,   Bud   Emmons, Paul wrote:   > Arie Vandenberg writes: > > >>The problem too, is that scholarship on this subject changes rather > > frequently. Yesterday's yea yea is today's nay nay. > > Even as a graduate student, I never felt very knowledgeable or confident = about ornaments. I had owned and consulted Donington's _Interpretation of = Early Music_, which was reputable; but then my teacher, Jerald Hamilton, = was a fan of Frederick Neumann, who often differed. So whom is one to = believe? > > Are these two still considered reliable authorities nowadays, or have = others taken their place? > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Ornamentation in Walther From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 16:02:07 EDT   Dear Emily:   I think you are on the right track. This is just my pet theory, but we don't play many Organs or Harpsichords tuned to Baroque temperments. Here's what I think. Quarter Comma Meantone was the most common tuning temperment for pipe organs at the time. My logic tells me that ornaments were used to cover perhaps some slightly sour notes, in the key chosen and depended on the direction up or down in that polyphonic part. Ornaments also added beauty and pizzaz to the style. At anyrate it made the music much more interesting to the player and listeners. That's just my educated guess as to the motive behind creating and using them. They may have written much differently in the modern temperments. I really have nothing else to base the practice on besides musical instinct. It is an idea to be strongly considered = though.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Kyrie by Rustichelli From: "John & Fran Meyers" <jack-fran1@cox.net> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 15:14:13 -0700   A Lutheran minister gave me a CD by Placido Domingo called "Sacred = Songs" Deutsch Grammophon. The second selection is a Kyrie composed by = Paolo Rustichelli arranged for tenor, choir, guitar, piano and = synthesizer. It is hauntingly beautiful arrangement. I would like to = find the sheet music for it. Our Dir of Music is a classical guitarist = and we have MIDI synthesizer in addition to organ. Would be so useful = for our choir repertoire. Anyone know of it? I have tried the internet = Google several times. There are Rustichelli pages for CD's, but nothing = on sheet music publishers. Thanks. Fran Meyers  
(back) Subject: Re: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 17:32:40 -0500   Alan,   This is the only Noon recital in the area. It's free. (Does the word "recital" indicate that its free? I don''t know the difference bewteen recital and concert) It is in the city. Not in the heart of the city, = rather in the heart of UW Madison. So attendance consists mostly of students and professors. 95% is foot traffic. And the sidewalks are FULL during in between classes. I think the recital time coincides with class schedules, = so students that have a break during that hour can attend. I'm not sure if music students are required to attend some of these, but I would guess = they get some sort of credit for it. Bruce put up a sidewalk marquise (for lack =   of a better term) that has "Noon Organ Recital today" on it. Very professional and classy looking. A sign company made it, I believe. I = think that many more would attend but parking is a problem down there, and it is =   about 10 blocks away from the Capitol and Business district. You can park = in the underground garage at the church (in the 'members only' spaces), but there's only about a dozen spots and its usually full if you get there = late. There is an overflow lot about a block away, but since there's major construction going on on the next street over (the street is CLOSED, major =   headache right now!) that parking lot is inaccessible. It is advertised in =   the daily paper here, under weekly activities (editorial not advertising, = so its free) in our entertainment section, under things to do during the = week. (If you go to madison.com, click on entertainment on the left side, then click on Rhythn calender, its usually in the Wed slot. Updates every = Sunday so no Wed listing yet.)   The Overture Center should help attract the business/government crowd, = being only 3 blocks away from the Capitol and professional/state office = buildings. They are installing a Klais by the end of 2004 and plan on having weekly recitals there. I would imagine there would be a admission fee for that.   I forwarded you email to Bruce, who plans on replying (if he hasn't already).   Thanks for your reply and comments! It's nice to hear from others, especailly a busy city like New York!   Keep in touch!   Mike Franch Madison, WI   _________________________________________________________________ Share your photos without swamping your Inbox. Get Hotmail Extra Storage today! http://join.msn.com/?PAGE=3Dfeatures/es    
(back) Subject: OHS 2005 correction From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 18:36:03 -0400   Hello, apologies, the Co-Chair of the Southeast Massachusetts 2005 OHS is Matthew Bellochio, not Michael. Dates are July 12 to July 19, 2005. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Popular music played on non-theatre organs From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 19:46:18 EDT   Greetings, In my personal collection I have:   1. Louis vanDyke "Playing the Beatles" on a tracker Flentrop in Holland,   2. Hannes Meyer "Stars and Pipes Forever" playing 13 definitely = non-classical literature such as Michelle, Malaguena, Ravel's Bolero and The Stars and Stripes Forever on assorted cathedral organs in Europe.   3. Anders Paulsson (sax) and Harry Huff at the Katarina Church pipe organ (Stockholm); album titled "In A Sentimental Mood, A Tribute to Duke = Ellington."   These are among my most played CDs. Awe inspiring! Acturally, playing = popular music on romantic organs such as Austin and Skinner proves to be a much greater challenge and more rewarding than playing this literature on = theatre organs. These manufacturers actually VOICED their organs to blend = properly.     IMHO, of course :-)   Musically, Stan Krider   In a message dated 10/09/2003 5:03:12 AM Eastern Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   > Subject: Re: Funny letter, Cinti Museum Center > From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> > Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2003 20:40:54 -0400 > > Hi chatters, > > Does anyone have/know of recordings of more popular music being played = on > non-theatre organs? I'd be interested to hear what it sounds like. > > > -Nate > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Popular music played on non-theatre organs From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 16:52:08 -0700 (PDT)   There is a CD of Douglas Major playing a collection of marches on the Washington Cathedral Organ (e. g., Sousa's Washington Post March, and The Stars and Stripes Forever....)with annotations by Paul Hume and Mr. Major...   Best wishes to all,     Morton Belcher         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Wed Noon Recital: Madison, WI From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 17:16:30 -0700       Mike Franch wrote: > > Alan, > > This is the only Noon recital in the area. It's free. (Does the word > "recital" indicate that its free? I don''t know the difference bewteen > recital and concert)   While these two words are sometimes used interchangeably, if one is being specific, recital is by an individual, or individual plus accompanist or a string of individuals.   A concert is by a group - orchestra, choir, etc.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Today's Organ From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 20:44:21 -0400   Greetings!   Today I had the extreme extreme pleasure of tuning a beautiful 1924 Casavant in Meriden, CT. This particular organ is 3m but is still pretty small. This organ drove home the point to me that it isn't necessarily = the quantity of stops that matters but the quality. Entering it's 80th year = the organ is getting tired, it has ventil chests and there are quite a few = dead notes and the chambers are very dusty. Never-the-less all of the reeds = were playing and took their proper pitch without fuss, and it is just a = gorgeous sounding instrument, a handsome console to boot!   The Choir features: 8' Dulciana 8' Melodia 4' Open Flute 8' Clarinet   The Great features: 8' Diapason 4' Octave 2' Super-Octave 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Trumpet   The Swell features: 8' String 8' Voix Celeste 8' Flute 4' Flute 8' Trumpet 8' Oboe 8' Vox Humana   I forget what the pedal contains but it does have a 16' Bourdon that is so well-voiced and so pure it rumbles the guts out of ya! The organ also sports a full selection of unison sub and octave couplers for all manuals and pedal. I really hope it gets restored (especially if I get to do it, ha!), it really is a wonderful instrument, so if anyone happens to be in Meriden, = CT check out the Casavant at St. Laurent!!   = -Nate      
(back) Subject: Re: Today's Organ From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 20:58:33 EDT   Hey Nate:   That organ is just a bit smaller than the one Dom Paul Benoit played in France. With great acoustics it should sound wonderful. Only thing missing, Nazard and Tierce Sw. and Fl. Harm. 8' Great. All the essentials are there. Dom Paul Played a Cavaille Coll of 21 ranks and three manuals.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Jose Lidon From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 19:43:22 -0500   Today on my way to court I was listening to a Decca remake of several recordings by St.John's College. Included was a 1959 recording by George Guest of Lidon's Sonata of the 1st Tone.   Does anyone know how to find the music score for this? I own the recent (1993) "Obras completas para organo, Fasciculo 1", which contains the 6 piezas sueltas and 4 piezas para la Misa, but no Sonatas. I checked the Schola Cantorum website (publisher for Guy Bovet's edition), but was not able to locate it if it was listed. I think I own some other Lidon, but was not able to lay my hands on it.   Any help would be appreciated.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: small romantic organs From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 18:23:45 -0700   The specification of the Cavaille-Coll organ at the Abbey of St. Maurice et St. Maur, at Clervaux, in Luxembourg as given on the Benoit webpage:   http://pws.prserv.net/usinet.danance/dpb/index.html   1st manual - Grand Orgue   16' Bourdon 8' Montre 8' Flute harmonique 8' Bourdon 4' Prestant     2nd manual - Positif   8' Salicional 8' Cor de nuit 4' Flute douce 2 2/3' Nazard 2' Flautino 8' Cromorne     3rd manual - R=E9cit   8' Flute 8' Gambe 8' Voix c=E9leste 4' Flute octaviante IV Plein-jeu 8' Trompette 8' Hautbois     P=E9dale   16' Soubasse 8' Basse   "The organ for which Dom Paul Benoit wrote is a 23 rank three manual Cavaill=E9-Coll, dedicated in 1907 by Alexander Guilmant at the Paris Exhibition, possibly located in a structure known as the "petit Trocadero", and later moved to the Abbey at Clervaux after its construction in 1910. The 3 manuals have a compass of 56 notes each and the pedalboard is of 30 notes."   I have cited this organ before as an example of good tonal design for a small romantic organ. The Recit is similar to Franck's at St. Clothilde, being built on (presumably) Harmonic Flutes at 8 and 4 plus the Plein Jeu.   One might tinker with the disposition slightly to make it a little more versatile, but the exquisite sound in the room must be taken into account. I've never heard the organ in person, but I'll wager there isn't a single stop on it that doesn't pull its own weight in usefulness.   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hey Nate: > > That organ is just a bit smaller than the one Dom Paul Benoit > played in France. With great acoustics it should sound > wonderful. Only thing missing, Nazard and Tierce Sw. and > Fl. Harm. 8' Great. All the essentials are there. Dom Paul > Played a Cavaille Coll of 21 ranks and three manuals. > > Ron Severin      
(back) Subject: Re: Jose Lidon From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 21:46:05 EDT   In a message dated 10/9/2003 8:04:39 PM Central Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes: Today on my way to court I was listening to a Decca remake of several recordings by St.John's College. Included was a 1959 recording by George Guest of Lidon's Sonata of the 1st Tone.   Does anyone know how to find the music score for this? I own the recent (1993) "Obras completas para organo, Fasciculo 1", which contains the 6 piezas sueltas and 4 piezas para la Misa, but no Sonatas. I checked the Schola Cantorum website (publisher for Guy Bovet's edition), but was not able to locate it if it was listed. I think I own some other Lidon, but was not able to lay my hands on it.   Any help would be appreciated. I have a copy-and actually played it in church a few weeks ago-    
(back) Subject: re: singing flat From: "Steve Gilson" <sgilson@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 21:50:26 -0400   >So, is there a physiological or biological/mechanical reason why we tend >to sing 'flat', and not go 'sharp'? I know it's true that the endency is >for the voices to go down. if we can figure it out, it may help us >resolve it.   Actually, if you sing in equal temperament, and go around the circle of fifths, you WILL end up flat. This combined with poor breath support, is what makes most choirs "drop". Thanksby the way, Sebastien, for the = single rise resevoir! I love it!   As someone else said, you can "ring" a chord acappella, as long as you = keep the intervals true within that chord. A tenor section singning three C's = in a row, one of them the root, one of them the third and one of them the = minor seventh have to sing three different notes. I know I'm splitting hairs = here (or cents!) by if you can teach your sections what their role is in any given chord, they will stay in pitch and ring that sucker like there's no tomorrow! (We used to call it "expanded sound", now we just call it = creating overtones!) As I always repeat to my choir (and I find myself repeating = now <grin>) sharpen the thirds, flatten the sevenths and lock those fifths. Combine this with good breath support and you'll never have to check the pitch at the end of a piece again.   Steve    
(back) Subject: Re: SINGING FLAT From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 20:50:50 -0500   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Jose Lidon From: "AJ" <AJ1995@cox.net> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2003 22:50:07 -0700     Glenda,   The Lidon "Sonata de 1 tono para clave o para organo con trompeta real" is in   Silva Iberica de Musica para tecla de los siglos XVI, XVII y XVIII Band I ED 4215 Schott and Co. Ltd., London   I just purchased this volume in 2003. The Lidon is one of 14 works in this volume.   Audrey Jacobsen     Glenda wrote: > > Today on my way to court I was listening to a Decca remake of several > recordings by St.John's College. Included was a 1959 recording by > George Guest of Lidon's Sonata of the 1st Tone. > > Does anyone know how to find the music score for this? I own the recent > (1993) "Obras completas para organo, Fasciculo 1", which contains the 6 > piezas sueltas and 4 piezas para la Misa, but no Sonatas. I checked the > Schola Cantorum website (publisher for Guy Bovet's edition), but was not > able to locate it if it was listed. I think I own some other Lidon, but > was not able to lay my hands on it. > > Any help would be appreciated. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Concert or recital From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2003 02:22:47 -0400   On 10/9/03 8:16 PM, "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> wrote:   > While these two words are sometimes used interchangeably, if one is = being > specific, recital is by an individual, or individual plus accompanist or > a string of individuals. > > A concert is by a group - orchestra, choir, etc.   I wouldn't want to pound the table about it, but I think that Del's definition fits very well with my own understanding of the words.   Maybe a performance by a small ensemble (string quartet, woodwind trio) could be called a "recital"?   Alan