PipeChat Digest #4060 - Monday, October 20, 2003
 
Food for thought #2
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: Food for thought #2
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Skyline or vista?
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Disney Hall opens
  by "bnorth" <bnorth@intergate.ca>
Re: Skyline or vista?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Skyline or vista?
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
live "surround sound" performances
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Skyline or vista?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Skyline or vista?
  by "Mark Gustus" <mgustus@msn.com>
Re: Skyline or vista?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Skyline or vista?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: live "surround sound" performances
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Werkprinzip
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
RE: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
AIO convention 05 (last part)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net>
RE: Food for thought
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net>
Re: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
RE: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Werkprinzip
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Interesting Web Site
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
RE: A new job at Christmas?
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: A new job at Christmas?
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Food for thought #2 From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 08:22:34 -0400   Good morning chatters!   Last Thursday my teacher/boss/genius and I completed a small mission = on a organ with a vertical selector style e-p (electro-pneumatic) combination action. The new organist is from the UK and likes UK style combination action. Particularly, he wanted to be able to couple his great and pedal pistons and be able to bring up both with one touch either on the great or on the pedal pistons. So, without any permanent modification of the console, we installed a small reisner 7 circuit 14 contact switch and used it to link up the 6 pedal and great picks for each piston, the other = circuit was also used to make it work. The switch gets it's power from the great/pedal primary tang and does not activate when setting pistons (which is very important, heheheh). The organist is absolutely thrilled (I mean THRILLED) about it, and all with the same console. Then, someday if the organist changes paths away from this organ, we can just yank it right = back out, it is seperately cabled and spread. Now this beautiful e-p console which is absolutely silent from any hisses or leaks can go on longer for more folks to admire. (C:   = -Nate   "The apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: Food for thought #2 From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 07:31:23 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   There are moments in life when one is faced with the startling revelation that ignorance is indeed bliss.   Does anyone know what "Nate the sparky" is talking about?   It's a good enough reason to stay with tracker.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Bigaquarium <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> wrote:   > So, without any permanent > modification of the > console, we installed a small reisner 7 circuit 14 > contact switch and used > it to link up the 6 pedal and great picks for each > piston, the other circuit > was also used to make it work. The switch gets it's > power from the > great/pedal primary tang and does not activate when > setting pistons   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Skyline or vista? From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:53:13 -0400   I can't help wondering what Colin had to eat that inspired such surrealism! Anyway, aren't orchestras, and choirs for that matter, terraced so that the people in the back can see over the heads of those in front?   David Baker    
(back) Subject: Disney Hall opens From: "bnorth" <bnorth@intergate.ca> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 08:14:57 -0700   www.latimes.com, todays edition features the opening of the new Disney = Hall. A collection of articles can be found about half way down the = title page, look for "Let it Shine"  
(back) Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 11:37:39 -0400   On 10/20/03 10:53 AM, "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> wrote:   > I can't help wondering what Colin had to eat that inspired such = surrealism!   As you can tell from looking at him, he doesn't each much of anything. = It's the DRINK that does it!   > Anyway, aren't orchestras, and choirs for that matter, terraced so that = the > people in the back can see over the heads of those in front?   And put the long horns in the back so they are "in phase" with the short ones in front? (As in a marching band?)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:45:27 -0500   Interesting concept! Historically, it seems that most musicians and performers from ancient Greece ampitheatres to the the present are placed in a single focal group, with the audience facing from one position, or even around the stage.   has it ever been tried where the performers and musicians are 'AROUND' the audience, and the audience is in the center? The closest I can come up with is antiphonal organs and choirs, but the antiphonal sections are still bunched together.   This would be a 'live' version of Surround Sound!   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: David Baker <dbaker@lawyers.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:53:13 -0400 Subject: Skyline or vista?   > I can't help wondering what Colin had to eat that inspired such > surrealism! Anyway, aren't orchestras, and choirs for that matter, > terraced so that the people in the back can see over the heads of those > in front? > > David Baker      
(back) Subject: live "surround sound" performances From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 09:07:32 -0700   As I recall, the forty-voice (!) Tallis motet "Spem in alium" is usually done that way, at least in recording sessions ... the groups ranged round the room with the conductor in the middle. I presume it's been done that way in performance as well, at least in the UK, where the churches and cathedrals are perhaps more amenable to that sort of thing.   It's been more than thirty years since I visited St. Mark's in Venice, so I don't remember if the triforium runs around the entire perimeter or not, but there are pieces in the Gabrieli repertoire that go up to as many as sixteen parts, so presumably they WOULD have had to put the extra groups someplace other than the two choir/organ galleries on either side of the Sanctuary, since those are rather small by our standards.   Of course, it's likely that Gabrieli (like Palestrina) performed his music with one or two singers and one instrument on a part. We know that Palestrina did; the scores in the Sistine library have the names of individual singers written on them.   Cheers,   Bud   David Evangelides wrote: > Interesting concept! Historically, it seems that most musicians and > performers from ancient Greece ampitheatres to the the present are = placed > in a single focal group, with the audience facing from one position, or > even around the stage. > > has it ever been tried where the performers and musicians are 'AROUND' > the audience, and the audience is in the center? The closest I can come =   > up with is antiphonal organs and choirs, but the antiphonal sections are =   > still bunched together. > > This would be a 'live' version of Surround Sound! > > David E > > David Evangelides > Colorado Springs, Colorado > > > -----Original Message----- > From: David Baker <dbaker@lawyers.com> > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:53:13 -0400 > Subject: Skyline or vista? > > >>I can't help wondering what Colin had to eat that inspired such >>surrealism! Anyway, aren't orchestras, and choirs for that matter, >>terraced so that the people in the back can see over the heads of those >>in front? >> >>David Baker > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 12:44:54 -0400   On 10/20/03 11:45 AM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> = wrote:   > has it ever been tried where the performers and musicians are 'AROUND' > the audience, and the audience is in the center? The closest I can come > up with is antiphonal organs and choirs, but the antiphonal sections are > still bunched together. > Oh, my, yes, by all means. We don't have the resources to do a lot of Gabrieli, but occasionally we've chased the paid quartet up to the = gallery, sometimes with a pair of trumpets, and tossed it forth and back a bit. = Even in our little church, it's A DANDY.   Then we had (at St. Luke's) a performance a couple years ago of the Monteverdi Vespers of 1610. At the end of the first half, the choir of 70 moved down the side aisles, leaving the organ, orchestra, and soloists up front; those 70 then filled in also the entire back wall of the room, so = we were totally surrounded. Not describable! (I'd been seated in a = near-back pew, but simply stood up and walked half-way down the center aisle and = took it all in; I wasn't about to miss THIS!)   Then there was the performance of the Berlioz Requiem I heard some years = ago at Carnegie Hall, in which brass quartets (of various ranges) were posted = in the far back corners of the second and third balconies to do their well-chosen things! Wow! (I'm sure that's not unique--I think Berlioz planned it that way, but it sure was fun.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? From: "Mark Gustus" <mgustus@msn.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 16:49:47 +0000     Hi Chatters,   Oh, yes! Last June I heard Jan Garbarek and The Hilliard Ensemble perform =   "Mnemosyne" at St. Paul's in London. All the performers moved about the church singly or in small groups. Home plate was a small platform at the foot of the choir steps. The sonic effect was was out of this world, though the music was a bit too new age for my taste.   -Mark   >From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? >Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:45:27 -0500 > >Interesting concept! Historically, it seems that most musicians and >performers from ancient Greece ampitheatres to the the present are placed >in a single focal group, with the audience facing from one position, or >even around the stage. > >has it ever been tried where the performers and musicians are 'AROUND' >the audience, and the audience is in the center? The closest I can come >up with is antiphonal organs and choirs, but the antiphonal sections are >still bunched together. > >This would be a 'live' version of Surround Sound! > >David E > >David Evangelides >Colorado Springs, Colorado   _________________________________________________________________ Add MSN 8 Internet Software to your current Internet access and enjoy patented spam control and more. Get two months FREE! http://join.msn.com/?page=3Ddept/byoa    
(back) Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:00:36 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   You should know that only American and German choristers actually watch the conductor!!   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK     --- David Baker <dbaker@lawyers.com> wrote: > I can't help wondering what Colin had to eat that > inspired such > surrealism! Anyway, aren't orchestras, and choirs > for that matter, > terraced so that the people in the back can see over > the heads of those > in front?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Skyline or vista? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:04:46 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I think its been done at the Globe Theatre, but by whom I cannot remember.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- David Evangelides <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote: Historically, it seems that > most musicians and > performers ........are placed > in a single focal group, with the audience facing > from one position, or > even around the stage. > > has it ever been tried where the performers and > musicians are 'AROUND' > the audience, and the audience is in the center?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: live "surround sound" performances From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 14:19:40 -0400   On 10/20/03 12:07 PM, "quilisma@cox.net" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > As I recall, the forty-voice (!) Tallis motet "Spem in alium" is usually > done that way, at least in recording sessions ... the groups ranged > round the room with the conductor in the middle. I presume it's been > done that way in performance as well, at least in the UK, where the > churches and cathedrals are perhaps more amenable to that sort of thing.   Bud, you, of all people, must have heard Healey Willan's "Apostrophe to = the Heavenly Host" (for more voices than I remember--it seems to me it must be 32, but maybe it's 'only' 16) done that way as well. Fabulosissimo!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 13:23:48 -0500   Yes -- it could still be werkprinzip. The term has as much to do with tonal structure as physical layout, but typically, and ideally, the layout would be vertical, not horizontal. Larry Wheelock   On Monday, October 20, 2003, at 04:01 AM, PipeChat wrote:   > If a baroque, 18th century werkprinzip organ were > stretch out horizontally across a floor, would it > still by werkprinzip?    
(back) Subject: RE: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 13:33:09 -0500   David,   =20   I'll be in DC November 5-9. Wha's happenin'?   =20   Peter   =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of DudelK@aol.com Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2003 7:55 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post   =20   There's an interesting piece about the hall by the Washington Post's architecture writer Benjamin Forgey at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A42062-2003Oct17.html      
(back) Subject: AIO convention 05 (last part) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 15:17:42 -0400   Andres Gunther agunther@cantv.net   AIO convention 2003 part 05: CONCLUSION   More than a week has gone by since I came back from the convention. I have finished "All the Stops" and are studying a more sholarly work (Orpha Ochse's History of the Organ in the United States) right now. Now a lot = of names and places are becoming a totally new significance for me when somebody on the List talks about them. I find US-american organ culture = very different - and fascinating.   Last saturday a former pupil, now junior colleague came to dinner and was hooked on with the Nichols & Simpson at St Augustine's (Kalamazoo, Michigan), the Aeolian-Skinner at Mother Church and the bunch of pictures, handouts and prospectusses I brought from the Convention. At last I put on "Sonic Bloom" to have him listen to a Theatre Organ (in Venezuela there never was one). At first he laughed aloud: "Imagine that in the German Lutheran Church". I put on the Callanwolde organ record. He became thoughtful. After dinner he told me: "do you have another Theatre Organ record there?"- Oh yes, I have: Scott Foppiano playing the Detroit = Senate's Mighty Wurlitzer. Fortunatedly my neighbors are tolerant people!   I want to express some toughts although perhaps as a newcomer I still lack some perspective or have overseen some backgrounds. Anyway:   1.- Changing music tastes in liturgy. This is a worldwide hard challenge = for us liturgical organists, but USA organ culture has a big advantage: a = fairly large organ music tradition from the times when musical entertainment and performance was done on organs at a surprisingly broad basis. Incidentally the interest in this organ culture branch is re-awakening; at least I was told so. Just on time given the conditions, I venture to say: from this we can take advantage and get some techniques and skills to apply in modern liturgical chants-- I know. The neobarroque and sholastic tendency didn't = go by without deep traces. It was of great benefit for organ culture level. = But now we must grit our teeths and bridge over the hard times... otherwise = the Praise Band could push the King of instruments into oblivition like it happened in my country 40 years ago when organists refused to adapt to modern times - and were fired.   2.- Increasing demand for relatively small organs (2 manuals). A = first-line german organ builder told me years ago: "We keep always small organs ready in stock for clients who want to get one, and fast. This is our bread- the mid-sized to large, artistic valuable instruments we build is only the butter on the bread". What about a stock of such "bread" instead leaving fast availability to = the E-competition? When I made my first trip to the US in 2001 I saw hundreds = of small churches and chapels- too small for III/40ers; even II/30ers. But = they are potential clients. (I don't know however to which point such stocks = are subjected to extra taxes or overhead costs in America!)   3.- It's said that the golden years of the American Organ are over. Are they really? Or could they come back in other fashion if properly encouraged ? Modern cinemas wouldn't get a pipe organ and very few people could afford a home organ like Callanwolde's. Right. But there are other places... the malls for example. I heard about organs in Pizza places. Further we have a relatively recent technical advantage: With digital electronics aid pipe organs both for church / concert or entertainment are easier to build and less bulky / expensive (nevertheless the rather short lifetime of such devices in comparison to other pipe organ components, = which remain as my technical concern nr 01). "History repeats itself" is a most true saying. It's hard for me to = believe that a so deep rooted interest of a people in the King of Instruments is definitely buried. If it is only asleep and has to be re-awakened I only = can join Richard Houghten's remark at the end of the AIO report: "Roll up = those sleeves!"   The End (which means: "the beginning" :) Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: RE: Food for thought From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 15:18:51 -0400   Andres Gunther agunther@cantv.net   Hmmm... If the "toaster mechanism" :) is 15 years old it could be = obsolete. A new one perhaps?   ----- Original Message ----- From: Bigaquarium <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2003 9:30 PM Subject: Food for thought     > Hello chatters! > > There is a certain Moller that was toasterized about 15 years ago or = so > that I get to tune a few times a year. It seems that a certain glitch = has > appeared in this organ (SNIP ETC)          
(back) Subject: Re: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 14:48:37 -0400   The only major thing I'm aware of is that the Cathedral Choral Society is = doing the Berlioz Requiem at the Big Top on Nov. 9 at 4 pm. I've heard it = there and it can be rather thrilling, esp. when all the brass go off up = and down those huge pillars at the crossing. You can link to them at = www.cathedral.org. There's usually not a whole lot during the week, and I = don't think the symphony is playing that day. You can go to the = entertainment section at www.washingtonpost.com and browse a bit too.   I think the big choruses make some attempt not to have overlapping = concerts on the same day. John Scott's kiddie choir from London was here = last night but I didn't make it up to hear them.   I'll keep your message and if I hear of anything interesting in the = meantime I'll let you know.   Cheers, David  
(back) Subject: RE: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 13:56:06 -0500   Thanks!   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of DudelK@aol.com Sent: Monday, October 20, 2003 1:49 PM To: "PipeChat" Subject: Re: Disney Hall Article in Washington Post   The only major thing I'm aware of is that the Cathedral Choral Society is doing the Berlioz Requiem at the Big Top on Nov. 9 at 4 pm. I've heard it there and it can be rather thrilling, esp. when all the brass go off up and down those huge pillars at the crossing. You can link to them at www.cathedral.org. There's usually not a whole lot during the week, and I don't think the symphony is playing that day. You can go to the entertainment section at www.washingtonpost.com and browse a bit too.   I think the big choruses make some attempt not to have overlapping concerts on the same day. John Scott's kiddie choir from London was here last night but I didn't make it up to hear them.   I'll keep your message and if I hear of anything interesting in the meantime I'll let you know.   Cheers, David "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 15:01:21 EDT   Hey Larry:   I'm beginning to understand Colin's concept, enchamade the flues and vertical the reeds. Maybe that's what his sureal moment was. I don't think it will sell real well. We could call it suspended Werkprinzip I suppose. It sure would be an eye opener to see those 16' Montre's sticking straight out at you. Now why didn't the Disney archetect think of that? It would be even more shocking than it is already, and would seem to go with the "concept."   I better quit while I'm ahead. <G>   Ron    
(back) Subject: Interesting Web Site From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 14:29:51 -0500   Stumbled on an interesting web site of organ definitions that may be of help to us:   http://www.rosskingco.com/CommitteeBook/glossary.htm     David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado      
(back) Subject: RE: A new job at Christmas? From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 14:51:50 -0500   When I lived in Miami, we attended a Christmas Eve service at Trinity Cathedral at 11 PM one year. None of the listed prelude music was performed, however, as apparently the organist was still "behind the barn." He eventually appeared and struggled through the carols that were to be sung. Not a pretty picture.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Glenda Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 7:38 PM To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: A new job at Christmas?   Bud is right - people are at home with family on Christmas Eve and Christmas in the South. There are very few services to be had.   These same people only drink behind the barn.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who as a child wondered where all the cheap whiskey bottles under the barn came from)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of quilisma@cox.net   My mother's church never did ANYTHING ... no services Christmas Eve OR=20 Christmas Day.   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote:   > So then what do they do for Christmas? (I don't think they get drunk, do > they?) >=20       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: A new job at Christmas? From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 13:03:32 -0700   Hmmm ... depending on when that was, the rector of Trinity CHURCH (before it became the cathedral) was enough to drive ANYONE to drink (chuckle) ... wish I could remember his name ... "Dr." (NOT "Fr.") Somebody-or-other. He was a REAL terror.   As I recall, an early Dean of the Cathedral was an organist, whom I had succeeded at St. Paul's in Winter Haven ... George N. ... can't remember HIS last name either.   Cheers,   Bud   Storandt, Peter wrote:   > When I lived in Miami, we attended a Christmas Eve service at Trinity > Cathedral at 11 PM one year. None of the listed prelude music was > performed, however, as apparently the organist was still "behind the > barn." He eventually appeared and struggled through the carols that were > to be sung. Not a pretty picture. > > Peter > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Glenda > Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 7:38 PM > To: 'PipeChat' > Subject: RE: A new job at Christmas? > > Bud is right - people are at home with family on Christmas Eve and > Christmas in the South. There are very few services to be had. > > These same people only drink behind the barn. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > (who as a child wondered where all the cheap whiskey bottles under the > barn came from) > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > quilisma@cox.net > > My mother's church never did ANYTHING ... no services Christmas Eve OR > Christmas Day. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Alan Freed wrote: > > >>So then what do they do for Christmas? (I don't think they get drunk, > > do > >>they?) >> > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 16:06:43 EDT   The prevailing concept of "werkprinzip" to which Americans have = tenaciously clung for a half a century is essentially 20th century in origin, and far = more rigid, limiting, and divorced from the authenticity of the Baroque organ = than we care to discover.