PipeChat Digest #4061 - Monday, October 20, 2003
 
Re: Keys with flats
  by "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Skyline or vista?
  by "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
New Book on Albert Schweitzer
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Interesting Web Site
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: Werkprinzip
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
RE: A new job at Christmas?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
One too many
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Werkprinzip
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Multiplex/Combination Actions
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Food for thought (reply)
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Humour - the best relief from tension
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: A new job at Christmas?
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Werkprinzip
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re:
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Food for thought (really!)
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Keys with flats From: "Del Case" <dcase@puc.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 13:45:58 -0700       Paul wrote: > > Someone mentioned that there is no such key as D sharp major? I must > therefore be doing something wrong, because I have been teaching people = that > scale for years!! > > Explain? Maybe I have missed the joke ;-) >   If there were a key of D# Major, it would be spelled D#, E#, F##, G##, A#, B#, C##, D#.   I have never seen double sharps or double flats in a key signature, though I suspect someone has done it just to do it. Since there are only 7 diatonic = pitches, you can have only 7 flats (Cb major) or 7 sharps (C# major) and you run = out.   However, there is a place in the Franck "Final" where he writes in the key of A# major. (The basic key of the composition is Bb major.) There is a section in six sharps and then he starts using double sharps and A# is clearly = established as a temporary tonic. The scale pattern for the section is A#, B#, C##, = D#, E#, F##, G##, A#. The three double sharp notes are, of course, by way of accidentals. The notes in that section are not difficult to play but awkward to read.   Del W. Case Pacific Union College  
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 16:46:47 -0400   On 10/20/03 4:06 PM, "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote:   > The prevailing concept of "werkprinzip" to which Americans have = tenaciously > clung for a half a century is essentially 20th century in origin, and = far more > rigid, limiting, and divorced from the authenticity of the Baroque organ = than > we care to discover.   More on that, from Seb or anyone else, would be of interest to me. I = played with, in, and on neat pipe organs beginning c. 1951. Met my first = Schlicker in 1957. (Loved it.) Visited his factory in Buffalo in 1963. But remain ignorant, and eager to learn more.   Alan, wondering why a "prinz" should know anything about "werk"    
(back) Subject: Skyline or vista? From: "David Baker" <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:08:08 -0400   Regarding: > > You should know that only American and German > choristers actually watch the conductor!! > > Regards, > Colin Mitchell UK   I think you have it backwards. Although it has been quite a while since I was in England, my recollection is that in England the choir director conducts everything, even the hymns. Don't tell me nobody pays any attention to him?? In any event, it's one thing to watch and quite another to actually follow directions; I can't say about Germans, but getting Americans to follow can be, shall we say, stressful. As an exception that perhaps proves the point, I recall the service of Evensong at the Chapel of the Transfiguration at the Community of Jesus during the Region I AGO Convention this summer (2003). It was really quite wonderful. Elizabeth {I can't remember her last name; conductor of the Gloria Dei Singers} conducted the anthems, but the chanting of the psalms was led by two choristers on either side of the divided "chancel"; i.e., the choir led itself! I put the word chancel in quotes because there really is not a chancel, per se; the High Altar is at the "east" end of the church, the choir area about 1/3 of the way down the nave, and congregational seating on both sides. If you don't know the church, it is well worth a trip to Orleans, on Cape Cod. It is a glorious room with an Aeolian-Skinner frankensteined by Nelson Barden from several different opuses (opi?). Tom Murray played a recital during the convention that transfigured us all. David Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:14:24 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/2003 4:13:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes: The prevailing concept of "werkprinzip" to which Americans have = tenaciously clung for a half a century is essentially 20th century in origin, and far more rigid, limiting, and divorced from the authenticity of the Baroque organ = than we care to discover. You mean I have been led down the yellow brick rosy red path? I dont need a 8 prin on 1 and a 4 prin on the next and 2 prin on the 3rd manual? It is not historic? It is not accurate?   While I truly guessed and knew that was the case, it does leave me = wondering if we really have any idea about anything historic? Can I continue to use = five fingers and heels?   Always seeking to learn what I learned incorrectly......   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:38:33 -0400   On 10/20/03 5:14 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > five fingers=20   Dale, you ARE talented! You mean, =B3in addition to the thumb=B2?   (Don=B9t answer; I=B9m just giving you a hard time. As you know.)   Alan        
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 14:47:44 -0700   Um, Dale, about Santa Claus (grin) ...   I have to wonder where the whole rigid werkprinzip came from in the first place, considering that NORTH German organs OFTEN had 8' Principals on more than one manual (and not just in organs that had a 16' Hauptwerk), open and stopped flutes at 8' on the same manual, and (hand to forehead in horror) STRINGS, made either as flue pipes or reed pipes ... some of those lingual Viola da Gamba stops are AMAZING.   True, there were rules (supposedly) about mixing wide and narrow choruses, but they always came back to the INADEQUATE wind supply ... remember Bach specifying MORE bellows?   Which leads one to wonder about several things ... voicing, ideal wind-pressure, etc.   The Rueckpositiv ISN'T present in most Silbermann organs, and they are considered "ideal Bach organs" as much as the Schnitgers.   My *ears* tell me that American organ-building took TWO wrong turns in one century: first the high-pressure orchestral organs, and then the screaming neo-not-baroque-at-ALL organs.   The orchestral organs are FUN ...   I'm not speaking here of the big ROMANTIC organs like Woolsey, Immaculate Conception, St. Luke's Evanston, Portland Auditorium, etc.   .... but rather the all-8' organs that aren't really suitable for playing ANYTHING, except maybe orchestral transcriptions.   And that's fine too ... leave 'em alone and play on 'em what they were built to play. There are some LOVELY examples out there, of type, and THEY need to be preserved TOO.   Certainly an organ like Woolsey has the choruses and mixtures to play Bach, though they may not SOUND like a Silbermann or a Schnitger.   And just about ANY Hook of any size at ALL can play just about ANYTHING (grin).   I hate to admit that the French are right about ANYTHING (chuckle), but = ...   "The final arbiter must be the GOOD TASTE of the organist."   Cheers,   Bud   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 10/20/2003 4:13:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > > The prevailing concept of "werkprinzip" to which Americans have > tenaciously > clung for a half a century is essentially 20th century in origin, > and far more > rigid, limiting, and divorced from the authenticity of the Baroque > organ than > we care to discover. > > You mean I have been led down the yellow brick rosy red path? > I dont need a 8 prin on 1 and a 4 prin on the next and 2 prin on the 3rd =   > manual? > It is not historic? > It is not accurate? > > While I truly guessed and knew that was the case, it does leave me > wondering if we really have any idea about anything historic? Can I > continue to use five fingers and heels? > > Always seeking to learn what I learned incorrectly...... > > dale in Florida      
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:47:47 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/2003 5:40:21 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > Dale, you ARE talented! You mean, =E2=80=9Cin addition to the thumb=E2= =80=9D? >=20   LOL i meant total.......   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:48:57 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/2003 5:43:24 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > Um, Dale, about Santa Claus (grin) ... > >   he is a she?     oh noooooooooooooooooooooooooooo    
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:52:48 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/2003 5:43:24 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > ... but rather the all-8' organs that aren't really suitable for playing =   > ANYTHING, except maybe orchestral transcriptions. > >   I will never forget a competition where i played the Vierne carillon and G =   major Bach. My page turner was from my home church --you might recall 46 = rank Aeolian, 5 four foot flutes 2 two foot stops two 22/3 and the rest 8 = galore.   The contest on a Casavant. My turner said she could not wait to hear the = Bach on the church organ so it could be played the way it is supposed to be....   uh, er, never mind mam. thanks for turning!   but the tromba sounded great....   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: New Book on Albert Schweitzer From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:59:58 -0400   OHS has begun taking orders on a new book about Albert Schweitzer and his editing of the Bach organ works, initially with Widor, and subsequently = with Edouard Nies-Berger for the final three volumes. The publisher indicates that the book should be deliverable by mid November, if not sooner. The author is Nies-Berger, a fellow Alsatian who had known Schweitzer since childhood. The book is on the opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org   This book has a special connection to those of us who live in Richmond, Virginia, where the OHS Catalog and OHS administrative office are located: Nies-Berger first came here in 1940 as organist of Centenary United Methodist Church, then removed to other places including New York City as organist of what became the New York Philharmonic. He returned to Richmond in 1960 as organist of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, retiring in 1968 and remaining. He died at age 98 in January, 2002. It seems that much work on the book was accomplished here.   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Interesting Web Site From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:35:11 -0500   The Wicks Organ Company has a similar glossary of terms. You can find it = at http://www.wicks.com/organ/glossary.htm   Brent Johnson ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand www.organlive.com     ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, October 20, 2003 2:29 PM Subject: Interesting Web Site     > Stumbled on an interesting web site of organ definitions that may be of > help to us: > > http://www.rosskingco.com/CommitteeBook/glossary.htm > > > David E > > David Evangelides > Colorado Springs, Colorado > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 15:40:51 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   A Porcupipe?   That's all folks,   Colin Mitchell UK.         --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > > I'm beginning to understand Colin's concept, > enchamade the flues > and vertical the reeds. It sure would be an eye > opener to see > those 16' Montre's sticking straight out at you. Now > why didn't the > Disney archetect think of that?   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 18:04:30 EDT   Dear Alan and Dale:   Werk Prinzip is a concept that existed in the minds of college organ professors who thought they knew something. In essence A two manual organ the Hauptwerk could contain a Principal chorus based on the 8' line, Positive on the 4' line and the Pedal on the 16' line. The pipe work was all unenclosed and the harmonic series was complemented supposedly with upper work to match. The problem was that sometimes the hauptwerk was given 4' principals, and the Positive 2' and the pedal 8' principals. Now everything is an octave too high. On three manual organs HW 16', Positive 8', Brustwerk 4' and Ped 32' just for the sake of carrying the idea to that extent. What happened is that gravity was seriously impaired if subsitutions of softer flutes for the missing principals at each level. The idea of coupling choruses an octave apart was supposed to add volume and gravity or to terrace dynamics. The idea is a Spartan one where less was thought to be better. You don't need all those 8' stops to clog up the polyphony, or do you? Even the old Baroque masters included strings and softer sotps, but these guys knew better. Full length reeds? You've got to be kidding. These exaggerations produced organs people had a problem living with, but professor so and so, recommends it so it has to be good. Voicing was high harmonics all the way, fundamental? What's that? You certainly don't want to clog your organ with a strong fundamental, and so it went from one "expert" to another. For a lighter sound use skip registrations, 8' and 2' or 4' and 1' or 8' and 1 1/3'. What happened? The organ lost it's magesty with these exaggereated nonsensical ideas. I recently played a Moeller two manual where the only 8' on the great was a miserable soft gedacht and a 4' principal, the swell a 2' principal and the pedal an 8' Principal. The mixtures would remove paint off a canvass backed painting and gouge glass off stained glass windows. These little unmusical beasties were perpetrated upon one and all. Sebastian is right, this was not Baroque practice but a 20th Century abberation. Hopefully we have past this stage of non builder "EXPERTS". These organs didn't sing they screeched like fingernails scratching a chaulkboard   So much for Werk Prinzip,   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: RE: A new job at Christmas? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 17:28:48 -0500   Peter, you've obviously mistaken Miami, Florida, for part of the South! You of all people know better. Nothing much below Gainesville or Ocala way is considered Southern anymore, for better or worse.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Storandt, Peter Sent: Monday, October 20, 2003 2:52 PM To: PipeChat Subject: RE: A new job at Christmas?   When I lived in Miami, we attended a Christmas Eve service at Trinity Cathedral at 11 PM one year. None of the listed prelude music was performed, however, as apparently the organist was still "behind the barn." He eventually appeared and struggled through the carols that were to be sung. Not a pretty picture.        
(back) Subject: One too many From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 16:00:35 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   There is a splendid story about S S Wesley during his tenure at Worcester Cathedral here in the UK. Known to enjoy a drink or two and also a keen fisherman, he would apparently leave the cathedral during the very long sermons, and indulge in a spot of fishing in the River Severn next to the cathedral.   One particular Sunday, having imbibed enough to bring an army to its knees, he staggered out, grasped his fishing-rod, staggered to the water's edge and fell in; just as a passing policeman rode past on a cycle.   The policeman went to his rescue; paddling into the water and dragging the unfortunate S S Wesley to the shore, with the words, "Permit me to be of assistance Sir".   Apparently, Wesley was just able to splutter, "Unless, officer, you are able to play the organ, I doubt that very much."   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> wrote: > When I lived in Miami, we attended a Christmas Eve > service at Trinity > Cathedral at 11 PM one year. None of the listed > prelude music was > performed, however, as apparently the organist was > still "behind the > barn."   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 16:16:12 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Ron's prejudices rise to the bait!   Are we suggesting that the lovely Flentrop at the Busch Reisinger is a flop?   Is Ron suggesting, from 4,000 miles + away, that the organ I play MUST be a dud?   Was I kidding myself when I heard that sonorous, robust Flentrop in Holland recently, with just thirteen speaking stops?   Well, Ron has a point, but it is the wrong point to make. All the above organs have one thing in common....absolutely wonderful rooms into which they speak.   THAT is the secret of Werkprinzip which, sadly, does not export quite so easily.   However, Ron is also absolutely right about fundamental tone. Many baroque organs have real gravitas, but seldom outright weight of tone. This is so important in much that is written for the organ.   I personally adore good baroque or neo-baroque instruments, but even I have to concede that, in many, many buildings, a good old romantic Skinner or an English Harrison & Harrison would sound far better.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Dear Alan and Dale: > > Werk Prinzip is a concept that existed in the minds > of college > organ professors who thought they knew something.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 19:49:12 -0400   On 10/20/03 6:40 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > A Porcupipe? > > That's all folks, > That's OK, Colin. Nobody else will chuckle with you, so EYE will. (Do = you have them critters over there?)   Alan (I know; I saw the penultimate consonant--or was it ultimate?) (But, boy, are you weird!)    
(back) Subject: Re: Multiplex/Combination Actions From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 20:03:52 -0400   This "new" peterson system is essentially the same thing that Classic Organ Works has been making for over fifteen years! You can try it, and be among the guinea pigs.   Or:   You could get the same thing, with years of experience behind it, and nearly all the bugs worked out from Classic.   I might use the ICS-4000 myself, if the need for it for some reason arose, but I wouldn't touch it for at least five years. These systems are software based, and as a result, are wide open to programming glitches. Every organ is different, every program is different. The possibilities for screwups are limitless!!   The Organworks system is essentially bugless after all these years, but it has been a long haul. The collective wisdom of their programmers is awesome.   Jim McFarland       On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 08:30:43 -0400 "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@msn.com> writes: We are about to begin a fairly large renovation and addition project to our III/38 1967 Moller. We are replacing our original remote combination action (which still functions perfectly on its original leather, believe it or not) with a solid state system (new switching, etc). After looking at literature and the three builders we plan to consider, we are extremely interested in the Peterson ICS-4000, their new product that integrates all functions into one system, accessible from one 4-line phosphorescent display. Does anyone out there have experience with this system? Any strong opinions on other systems? We are finding when we investigate that most builders are wedded to one company or another for this sort of thing...is there another company that has a similar product?   FYI: the literature for the Peterson ICS-4000 is available at www.petersonemp.com   Thanks!   Mark   Mark L. Hopper Associate Minister of Music and Organist The First Baptist Church 205 West Winder Street PO Box 75 Henderson, NC 27536 (O) 252-438-3172 (H) 252-492-6774 (F) 252-438-3710 markhopper@ncol.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Food for thought (reply) From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 20:14:13 EDT   In a message dated 10/19/2003 9:32:08 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Bigaquarium@netzero.net writes:     > . It seems that a certain glitch has > appeared in this organ and now without warning the organ will peal out = brief > blips at full organ for no apparent reason at all. The manufacturer had > "never heard of that happening before".   I wish I could have $5.00 for every time I have heard a manufacturer's rep =   tell me that one...   You didn't say whose guts were placed in the console/chambers, but this problem is not that un-common...I have seen this happen in a couple of = organs, particularly those who use a multiplex type relay system. I had a client = who had a system that "chirpped" randomly, and later began to "rooar" when the = organ was powered up...tho it never happened when I went to service the organ = (go figure...it NEVER fails to behave when the tech is there...lol)...but we = finally traced the "chirp" problem to induced voltages in the key contacts, which = we replaced with Peterson key-contct assemblies...problem number one solved. = The Roar turned out to be a loose connector on one of the multiplex de-coder boards and a hair-line crack in a ground trace on a circuit board. also = easliy resolved after some tracing.   Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Humour - the best relief from tension From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 01:24:57 +0100   Joke of the Week -   "What's the difference between a Terrorist and a Church-organist ?" "Sometimes you can negotiate with a Terrorist !" Heard on the B.B.C. programme 'Quote - Unquote' .. Sunday 19th October = 2003   and this evening's rehearsal was more than a little tense !   Harry [a.k.a. 'musicman']      
(back) Subject: Re: A new job at Christmas? From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 20:57:00 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/2003 6:49:38 PM Eastern Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes: Nothing much below Gainesville or Ocala way is considered Southern anymore, for better or worse. Actually that is pretty generous. Anything below Interstate 10 isnt much south anymore.   dale on the west coast of Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 08:57:18 +0800   Maybe walkprinzip? BE.   ---- Original Message ---- From: llwheels@mac.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Werkprinzip Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 13:23:48 -0500   >Yes -- it could still be werkprinzip. The term has as much to do >with >tonal If a baroque, 18th century werkprinzip organ were >> stretch out horizontally across a floor, would it >> still by werkprinzip? > >    
(back) Subject: Re: From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 09:10:32 +0800   Not all the neoclassic organs are as Ron described though I have seen a couple that would fit his description. There is a fine 1961 organ in my town built by Verschueren (Holland) that has beautifully integrated chorus work on the lower manual, topped by a French style Trompet. No screech, no over emphasis of the top. The mixtuur stop integrates with the chorus adding "body" to the chorus and just enough sparkle. The organ was originally of one manual with a second being added by the organist at the church where it stands. he did a pretty good job with the second manual matching the original pretty well. Stoplist of Manual I Prestant 8, Bordun 8, Oktaav 4, Fluit 4, Oktaav 2, Mixtuur II/III, Trompet 8. OK, it's small but so are some of the "screechers" I have heard. BTW it is NOT werkprinzip. Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: RonSeverin@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 18:04:30 EDT   >Dear Alan and Dale: > >snip.... I recently played >a Moeller two manual where the only 8' on the great was a miserable >soft gedacht and a 4' principal, the swell a 2' principal and the >pedal an 8' Principal. The mixtures would remove paint off a canvass >backed painting and gouge glass off stained glass windows. >Ron Severin >    
(back) Subject: Food for thought (really!) From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2003 21:25:08 -0400   > It's a good enough reason to stay with tracker.   Good evening chatters,   Ahhh yes, trackers are good too! I had the most pleasant experience = with a tracker last week! In Bethany, CT there is a Steere & Turner in the congregational church, and although it was modified in the 70's it is = still a beautiful organ. The modifications appear to be a cornet that was added in the swell, and a 3 rank mixture of sorts on the great. Also a dandy tremolo was added that really sounds great! There is a absolutely lovely Dulciana in the great, and a nice melodia and stopped flute as well. The pedalboard has a compass of 27 notes if I recall correctly.   - subject change -   I equate upperwork to condiments. When used tastefully they accentuate and reinforce the fundamental voices, octaves and the like. However, popular america is condiment-crazy, with gallons of syrup for the = pancakes, tons of salt and ketchup for the fries, and do I dare mention cream and sugar for the coffee. In the organ sense I get the impression that = certain builders at certain times really don't think we hear the organ well enough and insist on making sure that we do by appointing upperwork of such ear-splitting harshness that it could also serve as bug zapper.   = -Nate   "The tracker apprentice"