PipeChat Digest #4063 - Tuesday, October 21, 2003
 
Re: Transcribing
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Tuning Season
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: Tuning Season
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Food for thought (really!)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4062 - 10/21/03
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Food for thought (reply)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
"Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: "Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
The sadness of clowns
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Werkprinzip
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Werkprinzip"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Tuning Season
  by <Jason418@aol.com>
Re: Tuning Season
  by "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
RE: Werkprinzip
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Repair, Upgrade, or Replacement
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: "Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Food for thought (really!)
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Food for thought (really!)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Re: Food for thought (really!)
  by <giwro@adelphia.net>
RE: Re: Food for thought (really!)
  by "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com>
Re: "Gegenbewegung"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Real Coffee
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Real Coffee
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Real Coffee
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Transcribing From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2003 18:59:38 +0100   Colin, Isn't that what Liszt was supposed to have done to one of his (even more difficult than usual) concert pieces ? By writing it, one way, it was (almost) un-playable; but by mentally transcribing it into an adjacent key, it became substantially easier. Or so I was led to think, in my youth.   Harry [a.k.a. 'musicman']   -----Original Message----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 18 October 2003 14:38 Subject: Re: Transcribing     >Hello, > >Funny thing that! > >When I play that jolly little thingamibob by Percy >Whitlock in Gb major, I just dump all the flats and >substitute an F#. > >Is that cheating? > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > > >--- David Baker <dbaker@lawyers.com> wrote: >> > Andrew Mead said: >> > >> > I have always transposed. When I see a score >> marked with 2 sharps, I >> > play 5 >> > flats without even thinking. > >__________________________________ >Do you Yahoo!? >The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search >http://shopping.yahoo.com >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Tuning Season From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 07:22:56 -0400   Hi chatters!   This message is to the many organists on the list concerning the up-and-coming Christmas tuning rush. I would just like to remind you that for a more desirable result, your organ tuner will respond to bribes. In many cases you will find it necessary to do so. So, that being said, = please keep a well-stocked tin of candies on the console in preparation of your tuning. You'll be amazed how well it works! (C:   = -Nate   "The apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning Season From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 05:38:04 -0700   Um ... "candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker?"   Bigaquarium wrote: > Hi chatters! > > This message is to the many organists on the list concerning the > up-and-coming Christmas tuning rush. I would just like to remind you = that > for a more desirable result, your organ tuner will respond to bribes. = In > many cases you will find it necessary to do so. So, that being said, = please > keep a well-stocked tin of candies on the console in preparation of your > tuning. You'll be amazed how well it works! (C: > > = > -Nate > > "The apprentice" > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Food for thought (really!) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 09:39:49 -0400   On 10/20/03 9:25 PM, "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> wrote:   > do I dare mention cream and sugar for the coffee.   I'd rather you didn't, Nate. Putting cream and sugar in coffee is like putting a dollop whipped cream on a porkchop.   Alan (a disliker also of the trend now to flavored coffee at Starbucks, etc.)    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4062 - 10/21/03 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:43:13 +0100 (BST)   Yes it is! G flat is a totally different harmonic concept to G major. Don't ask me why. I'm an organist. Non negotiable!   Colin Mitchell wrote: When I play that jolly little thingamibob by Percy > Whitlock in Gb major, I just dump all the flats and > substitute an F#. > Is that cheating? John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : A perfect Ending 50 years ago   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: Food for thought (reply) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 08:49:53 -0500       Bigaquarium wrote:   > Yes! The current theory of this malfunction is something to do with > the multiplex system. I know nothing of these fancy devices to > comment beyond that. However, that explanation seems quite possible > to my uneducated-in-solid-statedness because if the organ is blipping > at full organ, it would make sense that the error was involved with > equipment that deals both with the stop and key action (otherwise how > would it make a sound??) >   I have come across a couple of organs where there was this kind of blip on full organ, including one on a new instrument, and it is usually a simple fault. Finding it, however, is not always that easy. In fairness to the manufacturers of solid state systems, though, someone's e-mail said that a fifteen-year-old system would be outdated. While it is true that systems are always being updated, it is usually easy enough to find the odd replacement card for older systems, and I do not know of any Peterson or Solid State Logic systems that have yet reached the end of their useful life, notwithstanding that I know of some that are thirty years old.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: "Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 10:13:57 EDT   Dear Pipechatters: The notion that the divisions of a pipe organ should each be an octave =   apart is, as we know, a contrived concept of the last century. = Furthermore, its adherents had little concept of how the organs they failed to emulate = actually worked. Nota Bene: I am not speaking of accomplished builders who studied =   what they admired and listened to what they built. Those organs endure. Were 16' Hauptwerks always used as 16' divisions? The answer is no. = Did such divisions contain 16' mixtures? Yes, they often did, and the = upperwork was much lower than the stuff being spit out by contemporary builders. Did extending our manual range from 49 or 51 notes back then, to 61 notes now, =   exacerbate the problem? Yes, indeed. Were Zimbeln actually doublings of the upper ranks of the main manual mixtures, or were they super-high-pitched, untunable, unstable screechers = that sat atop of, and apart from, the chorus? Was real Germanic mixture-work alternating quints and octaves, or were there plenty of pitch doublings, = as well as tierces in the plenum? A bit of reading and listening might be in = order... If we look at the major organs of Bach's era (and AREA - some of the organs that we think he played and heard were ones he never encountered), = we find that there may have been greater divisional parity, with shifts of scaling = and color more than "jumping the octave for the secondary sections." Remember, =   too, that VERY few indications of manual changes are given in organ music = of the era, and pedal couplers were rarer then than they are now. This gives = some musicological insights into the connection between organbuilding and performance practice. A final note on including Moller in the "orgelbewegung" discussion: except for the few mechanical action organs built by Chris Linde in their = shop late in their history, I believe that they were pretty much clueless. If I remember correctly, I actually saw a specification in one of the organ = journals from the late 1940s or early 1950s in which a Moller "Positiv" or "Brustwerk" = was a two-stop affair, comprised of a 4'(!!!) Quintadena and a Zimbel. All that effort to make those itty-bitty pipes, plus one of those horrid Moller = primaries and two sets of amoebae posing as pouchblocks, just for something that = useless and inapplicable. Oh, well... I'm sure it wasn't the worst. The result? The present "Orgelgegenbewegung." Not just a turn toward neo-Romanticism and neo-Symphonic organs, but a =   highly developed modern classical organ based upon what Bach REALLY played = and heard and designed, the instruments of Trost, Hildebrandt, and others.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 08:09:57 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   And in that, Sebastian is absolutely right, but I cannot help think that the Baroque equivalent to a modern en-chamade reed wasn't the high-pitched Cymbel; often with the tierce ranks thrown in for good measure.   The one by Schnitger at Zwolle just cracks in like a second organ being added, and the same is almost true at Haarlem.   I recall with purring pleasure, the sound of Zwolle and the Bach Great A-minor. The organist (I cannot recall who it was) added just two stops for those last three chords....the 32ft reed and the Cymbel...and it was just a "Wow!"   Of course, unless the building can carry it, you're better off with a good reed!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > Dear Pipechatters: > The notion that the divisions of a pipe organ > should each be an octave > apart is, as we know, a contrived concept of the > last century.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: The sadness of clowns From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 08:15:16 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   It's not that I CAN'T play it in Gb major you understand, it's simply because I INTERPRET the jovial nature of the work and turn into an hysterically giggling G major.   ;-)   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > Yes it is! G flat is a totally different harmonic > concept to G major. Don't ask me why. I'm an > organist. > Non negotiable! > > Colin Mitchell wrote: > When I play that jolly little thingamibob by Percy > > Whitlock in Gb major   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 08:36:20 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   No, we only have porcupines in zoos.   I loved the skunks over there, but they didn't want to play with me. Sort of turned their backs!   An' I thought they were friendly creatures.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: Can one keep a racoon as a pet?     --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote: > On 10/20/03 6:40 PM, "Colin Mitchell" > <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > > > A Porcupipe? > > > > That's all folks, > > > That's OK, Colin. Nobody else will chuckle with > you, so EYE will. (Do you > have them critters over there?)       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 08:41:41 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I retract....whatever it was I said.   :)   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Colin: > > What do you mean, "rise to the bait?"   > So retract > that statement you made.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning Season From: <Jason418@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 12:34:46 -0400   In a message dated 10/21/2003 8:38:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = quilisma@cox.net writes:   > Um ... "candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker?"     Um......which produces a better tuning? Candy or liquor? Inquiring minds want to know.      
(back) Subject: Re: Tuning Season From: "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 13:10:06 -0400   I prefer chocolate bars.   In any case CALL NOW for an appointment. Don't expect that you can call on Dec 23rd and get a full tuning done! Many companies are fully booked up by Dec 1st. So get your requests in early.   Besides we could use the money.   Nelson Denton R.A Denton & Son.     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.528 / Virus Database: 324 - Release Date: 16-Oct-03    
(back) Subject: RE: Werkprinzip From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 13:54:39 -0400   Larry Wheelock writes:   > Yes -- it could still be werkprinzip. The term has as much to do with=20 tonal structure as physical layout, but typically, and ideally, the=20 layout would be vertical, not horizontal.   The most thorough articulation, or ostensibly so, of the Werkprinzip = that I have ever read is _The Organ as Musical Medium_ by John = Fesperman, dated 1962. I read it as a freshman in college and still = have it.   To those familiar with this book: is it accurate, sound, and based on = history, or more on theory and fantasy? Did it define or represent what = someone here called essentially a twentieth-century American idea? Was = it an influential book?   As I recall, the author was a curator of musical instruments at the = Smithsonian Institution, so presumably he knew what he was talking = about; but in retrospect I recall a certain dogmatism in the writing = that seemed to be more than an objective, _a posteriori_ examination of = the ways that historical organs were really built.      
(back) Subject: Repair, Upgrade, or Replacement From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:11:48 -0500   Hello, Nate, John, et al:   You wrote:   > > Yes! The current theory of this malfunction is something > > to do with the multiplex system... * * * > In fairness to the manufacturers of solid state systems, > though, someone's e-mail said that a fifteen-year-old system > would be outdated.   Until the "blip at full organ" happened, did the keying and stops function properly? If so, then, the system is not out dated, ...simply malfunctioning. It is still functioning as designed 15 years ago, ...but with a new quirk that needs to be isolated.   > ...and I do not know of any Peterson or Solid State Logic > systems that have yet reached the end of their useful life, > notwithstanding that I know of some that are thirty years old.   That is the point. A keying and stop control system is not outdated just because it is old. I have a Saville organ in my father's church that is still working quite nicely on the keying and stop control system that came with it 25 years ago. The same can be said of many of the solid-state systems of other manufacturers.   If you wish to correct a solid-state component, you will need an electronic technician's mental training and experience to isolate the malfunctioning component, card, or power supply. Bite the bullet, call a tech, and get it fixed. It isn't really broken, just crippled. Corrective action is probably much less costly than replacement.   F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs     ..    
(back) Subject: Re: "Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 16:05:22 -0400   Tuba,   Thanks for the excellent essay. Had I not read all the way through to the bottom, I would not have seen "Orgelgegenbewegung!" Thank you that. Is = that original to you, or has it been around and I just missed it?   Thanks,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2003 10:13 AM Subject: "Werkprinzip": construction and performance practice     > Dear Pipechatters: > The notion that the divisions of a pipe organ should each be an = octave > apart is, as we know, a contrived concept of the last century. Furthermore, its > adherents had little concept of how the organs they failed to emulate actually > worked. Nota Bene: I am not speaking of accomplished builders who = studied > what they admired and listened to what they built. Those organs endure. > Were 16' Hauptwerks always used as 16' divisions? The answer is no. Did > such divisions contain 16' mixtures? Yes, they often did, and the upperwork was > much lower than the stuff being spit out by contemporary builders. Did > extending our manual range from 49 or 51 notes back then, to 61 notes = now, > exacerbate the problem? Yes, indeed. > Were Zimbeln actually doublings of the upper ranks of the main = manual > mixtures, or were they super-high-pitched, untunable, unstable = screechers that > sat atop of, and apart from, the chorus? Was real Germanic mixture-work > alternating quints and octaves, or were there plenty of pitch doublings, as well as > tierces in the plenum? A bit of reading and listening might be in order... > If we look at the major organs of Bach's era (and AREA - some of the > organs that we think he played and heard were ones he never = encountered), we find > that there may have been greater divisional parity, with shifts of = scaling and > color more than "jumping the octave for the secondary sections." = Remember, > too, that VERY few indications of manual changes are given in organ = music of the > era, and pedal couplers were rarer then than they are now. This gives some > musicological insights into the connection between organbuilding and > performance practice. > A final note on including Moller in the "orgelbewegung" discussion: > except for the few mechanical action organs built by Chris Linde in = their shop late > in their history, I believe that they were pretty much clueless. If I > remember correctly, I actually saw a specification in one of the organ journals from > the late 1940s or early 1950s in which a Moller "Positiv" or "Brustwerk" was a > two-stop affair, comprised of a 4'(!!!) Quintadena and a Zimbel. All = that > effort to make those itty-bitty pipes, plus one of those horrid Moller primaries > and two sets of amoebae posing as pouchblocks, just for something that useless > and inapplicable. Oh, well... I'm sure it wasn't the worst. > The result? > The present "Orgelgegenbewegung." > Not just a turn toward neo-Romanticism and neo-Symphonic organs, but = a > highly developed modern classical organ based upon what Bach REALLY = played and > heard and designed, the instruments of Trost, Hildebrandt, and others. > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City >      
(back) Subject: Re: Food for thought (really!) From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 16:17:34 -0400       On 21 Oct 2003 at 9:39, Alan Freed wrote:   > Alan (a disliker also of the trend now to flavored coffee at > Starbucks, etc.)     Across Germantown Avenue from the Seminary is a Wawa. And it's ALWAYS mobbed with students, faculty and staff. One sees a plethora of Wawa = coffee cups - from 12 to 20 oz. sizes - in class and on campus.   I usually get Caramel (with Half-n-half and 2 sugars if 16 oz or over). I = tried the chocolate-macadamia once. Very good, but my garsh.... when I got to work, = I was WIRED. I figure there must be as much caffeine in that stuff as a can of = Jolt!   (Wawa, btw, is a 24-hour quickie store, like 7-11. It is named for a town = in the western suburbs of Philadelphia. The Wawa farm was a dairy farm, and sold = milk. Its milk made it into the local grocery chains, and then they opened the = first market, which expanded and expanded its locations.)   --Shirley, lover of flavored coffees and herbal teas          
(back) Subject: Re: Food for thought (really!) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 17:38:23 -0400   On 10/21/03 4:17 PM, "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> wrote:   > I usually get Caramel (with Half-n-half and 2 sugars if 16 oz or over).   And your primary medical care-giver says what?   What I wonder is: Doesn't anybody like 'COFFEE' any more?   > I tried the chocolate-macadamia once. Very good, but my garsh.... when = I got > to work, I was WIRED. I figure there must be as much caffeine in that = stuff > as a can of Jolt!   Actually, that DOES sound quite tempting! It may not be coffee, but it sounds like fun anyway! > Alan (who maybe should try Jolt, whatever that is)    
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Food for thought (really!) From: <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:46:38 -0700   Yes, Alan - EYE like coffee as God intended: BLACK and STRONG with NO = extra additives or flavors. <chuckle> If ya gotta ADD to it to like it, yer not a REAL coffee lover.   Jonathan (who is enjoying an afternoon cup even as we speak)     > From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> > Date: 2003/10/21 Tue PM 02:38:23 PDT > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Food for thought (really!)   <snippage>   > What I wonder is: Doesn't anybody like 'COFFEE' any more?      
(back) Subject: RE: Re: Food for thought (really!) From: "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 17:59:19 -0400   Here, here! Mari who also favours strong, black coffee.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of giwro@adelphia.net Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2003 5:47 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Re: Food for thought (really!)     Yes, Alan - EYE like coffee as God intended: BLACK and STRONG with NO = extra additives or flavors. <chuckle> If ya gotta ADD to it to like it, yer not a REAL coffee lover.   Jonathan (who is enjoying an afternoon cup even as we speak)     > From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> > Date: 2003/10/21 Tue PM 02:38:23 PDT > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Food for thought (really!)   <snippage>   > What I wonder is: Doesn't anybody like 'COFFEE' any more?     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: "Gegenbewegung" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 18:13:29 EDT   Dear Malcolm: I WISH that I could take credit for the term, but it has been around = for some time, as applied to organbuilding. I first encountered it as the = subtitle of a book, and for the life of me I have drawn a blank on the author.   Seb  
(back) Subject: Re: Real Coffee From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 18:19:59 EDT   Coming from an Austro-Hungarian background (and a quarter = Transylvanian at that), I can assure you that coffee must be dense enough and dark = enough to actually absorb photons and other interstellar subatomic particles, and be =   smooth enough to taste rich while still being used as an industrial parts stripper. It may not be diluted with cream unless you are Italian or French, and =   you have just arisen from a good night's sleep. The penalty for the addition of sugar varies from culture to = culture...   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Real Coffee From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 19:59:54 EDT   I particularly enjoy buying fresh coffee beans from Whole Foods (Pleasant Morning Buzz is my fav. kind, the beans are naturally oily and very = black), grinding them, filling the basket almost all the way full, and only = putting about 7 cups of water in the maker. The result is ultra strong and rich coffee, which I dilute with about 2 tbl spns of fresh half and half. It is = unreal. I have also come to enjoy making my own fresh whipped cream with strong = coffee. All of this facilitates late night practicing after a long day of school. = In fact, I've had a bit of trouble sleeping lately!   Speaking of coffee.......I think the most awful coffee I've ever had has = been in churches. Its always cheap, nasty, and pre ground, and WEAK. YUCK! What's the deal with that??? Anyway, I just had some wonderful coffee that will fuel an evening of = organ and harpsichord practice! Cheers!   Gregory    
(back) Subject: Re: Real Coffee From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 19:20:44 -0500   Hello,   What's wrong with eating coffee beans? I have a friend -whom I have shown the organ practice rooms here to keep this on topic- who eats them during lectures. He stays awake.   Personally, I prefer soda to keep me awake while I practice, but there is nothing like coffee on Sunday morning betweeen services. And my professor strongly suggests coffee before lessons. I disagree: It makes me alert to HIS mistakes ;)   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Gfc234@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2003 19:59:54 EDT Subject: Re: Real Coffee   > I particularly enjoy buying fresh coffee beans from Whole Foods > (Pleasant > Morning Buzz is my fav. kind, the beans are naturally oily and very > black), > grinding them, filling the basket almost all the way full, and only > putting about 7 > cups of water in the maker. The result is ultra strong and rich > coffee, > which I dilute with about 2 tbl spns of fresh half and half. It is > unreal. I > have also come to enjoy making my own fresh whipped cream with strong > coffee. > All of this facilitates late night practicing after a long day of > school. In > fact, I've had a bit of trouble sleeping lately! > > Speaking of coffee.......I think the most awful coffee I've ever had > has been > in churches. Its always cheap, nasty, and pre ground, and WEAK. YUCK! > > What's the deal with that??? > Anyway, I just had some wonderful coffee that will fuel an evening of > organ > and harpsichord practice! > Cheers! > > Gregory >