PipeChat Digest #4069 - Sunday, October 26, 2003
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #4068 - 10/26/03
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4068 - 10/26/03
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Mice with no balls
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Detroit - Oct. 31 - Olivier Latry, Titular Organist, Cathedral of Notre D
  by "Donna R. Hollis" <donna@dc.ipmail.att.net>
FWD: Request: Hector Olivera "Intermission" CD
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Detroit - Oct. 31 - Olivier Latry, Titular Organist,	Cathedral ofNotr
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Mixing styles (hideously long)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Mixing Styles
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
OFF-TOPIC: fires in So Cal (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
chiff
  by "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: chiff
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
OFF-TOPIC: So Cal fires (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Mixing Styles
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: So Cal fires (X-posted)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
So Cal fires (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Mixing Styles
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Mixing Styles
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4068 - 10/26/03 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:10:58 +0000 (GMT)   1)Nicking pipes   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : A perfect Ending 50 years ago   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4068 - 10/26/03 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:36:58 +0000 (GMT)   1) Nicking pipes. Neo baroque organs built in Europe did not save any money by using the shorter pipes called for by higher pitched stops, and regulating un-nicked pipes requires more time and skill than those which are nicked. The pipes in our organs (Grant, Degens and Bradbeer) were usually of high quality metal - tin and lead - which is expensive, and also usually included expensive reed stops. Mixtures had 4 or 5 ranks, again, costly. They took longer to voice satisfactorily - though this was done with great skill by Johnn Degens, who had been Compton's reed voicer prior to their closure. Maybe some American builders tried to do it on the cheap. I agree that they need sympathetic voicing in a dry room, but go to Tooting Methodist Church which has a 2 manual 5 + 6 + 5 instrument 1967 Grant Degens & Bradbeer. http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/npor.html and see how effective a small neo baroque instrument can be for a non conformist church, mainly accompanying hymns. It is quite specifically designed on a pedal 8', great 4', Swell 2' Principal chorus scheme, with a 4 rank mixture on the grat, my favourite larigot on the swell, which also has an 8' trumpet, and a 16' Rankett - short length resonators on the pedal. a Swell to great 16' coupler gives a traditional English full swell effect. It does not scream and can play romantic music just as effectively as Bach. 2) Romantic/neo classical mix. If you want to play a very successful 2 manual 35 stop Romantic/Baroque instrument go to St Mary of Eton, Hackney Wick, London E9, where there is a magnificent combination of J W Walker and G D & R at the West end of a church modelled on King's College, Cambridge and Eton College Chapel - throw in St. Mary's Redcliffe for good measure and you will have some idea of the acoustics. The Harmonic Trumpet - a vertical Fanfare Trumpet - is available on both great and swell. http://lehuray2.csi.cam.ac.uk/npor.html I haven't played it for some years, so I don't know what condition it's in now, but I gave the opening recitals on both these organs and they were a pleasure to play. John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : A perfect Ending 50 years ago   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: Mice with no balls From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:58:46 +0000 (GMT)   Greece is hardly at the cutting edge of technology, but you can pick up a ball free mouse for 16 Euros which seems to operate effortlessly within its own red light district. It doesn't even need a pad. Chuck out the crappy old technology and replace with something new and efficient. Digital replaces Tracker. On a different track, I have added some photographs of the now defunct Volos - Kalambaka narrow guage line to the photo album in Orgofftop. I travelled this route about ten years ago - it took 5 hours to cover 150 kms. Totally charming with stations in Church and Farm yards. Approximately 8 passengers on each tran at 3 trains per day, with a staff of 600 to pay, meant that it was less than economic, and even in Greece just occasionally cost effectiveness is considered.   Ron Severin wrote "Pull the ball out and clean the dust out with a clean cloth. Dirt gets caked in there." John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Farewell to an era - Concorde says goodbye 50 years ago Menu of the week : Moussaka   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Detroit - Oct. 31 - Olivier Latry, Titular Organist, Cathedral of Notre Dame Paris From: "Donna R. Hollis" <donna@dc.ipmail.att.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 06:45:02 -0500   On Friday, October 31, Olivier Latry will present an organ recital in Detroit, MI at the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament. The recital begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 advance; $15 at the door. The = Cathedral is located at 9844 Woodward Ave, Detroit MI 48202 (2 blocks north of = Chicago Blvd.). For information on ordering tickets call 313-865-6300.       Olivier Latry, titular organist of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris is one of the world's most distinguished organists. The recital will include works by Bach, Berlioz, Franck, Alkan, Guilmant, Vierne, and conclude with an improvisation in the French tradition by Mr. Latry. He will perform on the newly installed Austin organ, a two manual and pedal instrument consisting of 29 ranks, 32 stops and 1,745 pipes. The vault of the apse along with the instrument's favorable placement and scaling creates = unusual clarity of tone in the Cathedral's reverberant acoustic. Design details include hooded reeds for both the Great and Pedal divisions, heavy swell = box construction for optimum expression, and an over-length 12" scale 16' Principal in facade.        
(back) Subject: FWD: Request: Hector Olivera "Intermission" CD From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 06:14:35 -0600   We received the following at the Administration account which I am forwarding to the list. Please respond to the address below as this person is not on the list.   David   **************************FORWARD MESSAGE********************************* WANTED: CD (playable condition) of Hector Olivera at the Atlanta Fox, entitled "Intermission"   EMAIL: mssz@cise.ufl.edu (Mark Schmalz) -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Detroit - Oct. 31 - Olivier Latry, Titular Organist, Cathedral ofNotre Dame Paris From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 08:21:18 -0500   If you're in the Detroit area, you should try to go see Latry. I saw him Friday night in Akron, and it was a wonderful concert. Latry is amazing both technically and musically. It's really a recital you don't want to miss!   Shelley   >>> donna@dc.ipmail.att.net 10/26/03 6:45 AM >>> On Friday, October 31, Olivier Latry will present an organ recital in Detroit, MI at the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament. The recital begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 advance; $15 at the door. The Cathedral is located at 9844 Woodward Ave, Detroit MI 48202 (2 blocks north of Chicago Blvd.). For information on ordering tickets call 313-865-6300.       Olivier Latry, titular organist of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris is one of the world's most distinguished organists. The recital will include works by Bach, Berlioz, Franck, Alkan, Guilmant, Vierne, and conclude with an improvisation in the French tradition by Mr. Latry. He will perform on the newly installed Austin organ, a two manual and pedal instrument consisting of 29 ranks, 32 stops and 1,745 pipes. The vault of the apse along with the instrument's favorable placement and scaling creates unusual clarity of tone in the Cathedral's reverberant acoustic. Design details include hooded reeds for both the Great and Pedal divisions, heavy swell box construction for optimum expression, and an over-length 12" scale 16' Principal in facade.       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Mixing styles (hideously long) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 07:10:40 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Well, it looks as if there is sufficient interest to start a war!   The mixing of the baroque with the romantic is not so strange as may first appear. I was rambling on about this after hearing St.Bavo for the three hundredth time back in August, which I referred to as the first romantic organ.....a statement which is rubbish really!   As Sebastian Gluck pointed out recently, the "neo-Baroque" organ was forced into a particular mould by the organ-reform lobby. "Werkprinzip" was, in essence, a contrived set of rules which bore only passing resemblance to the true organ-building mastery of the baroque period.   In reality, baroque organs are as many and varied as any other style of instrument, and I can think of no greater contrast than, for example, the organs of Sillbermann (basically French baroque organs with a proper pedal organ) and Schnitger; the latter far more architectural in tonal concept, and rather more piercing of tone. Both, of course, require extraordinary rooms into which they can speak and "bloom". Once those buildings are taken away, any attempt to replicate the exact voicing of those instruments is bound for disaster. Indeed, without those rooms, the fundamental tone simply vanishes; like a violin string without a violin.   Modern history is littered with examples of thin sounding instruments which their designers consider "baroque", but which are, in effect, very modern organs of dubious musical worth. We have just as many bad musical examples here in the UK as you do in America and elsewhere.   It is all well and good to want a "baroque" instrument, but where does one start? Are not the old organs of Italy, of Poland, of Czechoslovakia (as was), Holland and even the UK, as "baroque" as any Silbermann or Schnitger? Answer:- Of course they are.   A perfect example of organ translation is to be found in the work of John Snetzler, whom we believe may well have been involved in the building of the St.Bavo instrument in Haarlem. If so, he did not attempt to replicate the exact techniques of that extraordinary instrument when he arrived in the UK. Instead, he built organs (without independent pedal organs) which were more refined, more restrained and more appropriate to the English love of baroque "bel-canto".   The tonal architecture of the baroque was all still there!   The Snetzler style became, in effect, the English tradition for the next one hundred and twenty-five years, or thereabouts, as other builders simply followed the example of Snetzler's work. Nothing much changed except for the introduction of the Swell organ and the venetian shutter.   Some old organists I used to know, and probably now long gone, used to refer to "Victorian Baroque", and I could never understand this term. However, they were absolutely right and I was merely ignorant. If we look at the early organs by William Hill, (who had joined with Elliot, who in turn had connections with Snetzler etc), they were, in effect, Snetzler organs by another name......not exactly, but quite close in concept.   Along comes Mendelssohn to the UK, who finds that he cannot play his beloved Bach in concert, because the organs are not equipped with an independent pedal organ. He talks to Prince Albert, and Prince Albert talks to other organists, and they talk among themselves. Enter the arena one Dr Gauntlett, who is a friend of William Hill. Between them, they come up with the idea of an "English" organ (actually a German Snetzler style of instrument) with a Swell box, but to which they add a "German" pedal organ......the early "Romantic" organ in effect.   Now, at that moment in time, one particular organ builder (Hill) has created a marginally expressive instrument with proper chorus work, relatively low pressures, an independent pedal organ with generously scaled basses and an instrument suitable for most, if not quite all, the music written for the organ up to that time. More importantly, it is a tonal style of organ-building suited to an English parish church (and by default many American churches) rather than a great cathedral or hall-church such as Haarlem, where it all started.   Well, that's ONE way to go.....an admixture of early romantic and restrained Snetzler baroque, and it works, to a point. In fact, in recent years, Mander organs virtually re-created this particular style in the new organ for the RCO at Holborn,London, here in the UK, and it works very, very well.   Now enter the arena a certain Mr Edmund Schulze of Germany, who comes to the UK at the personal invitation of his fellow countryman, His Royal Highness Prince Albert. He builds a huge organ for Doncaster Parish Church, following a fire which destroyed the old Ward organ which William Hill was in the process of enlarging.   Schulze brings from Thuringia his own version of the early romantic organ, but with many, many aspects of the baroque. Open foot voicing, big choruses, an independent pedal organ, quint mixtures and generously scaled basses. He also brought genius, and an "ear" second to none. It was this one organ (forget about Armley, which was stuck in a private house and then crammed into a tiny organ chamber in an unsuitable church) which altered the whole course of UK organ building. Still substantially the same as when it was built, the Doncaster organ can still wow people by its awesome majesty. Lest we forget, it was THIS organ which caused T C Lewis (England's finest organ builder of the 19th century) to say that Schulze was the finest organ builder of all, and the organ at Doncaster better than any other. Now that is considerable praise from a man who knew what he was about. It also influenced T C Lewis, and when he built the organ of Southwark Cathedral in London, he built our very own English-Schulze which remains the finest instrument in London by far. (Heavily restored by Harrison and Harrison, and sounding good).   So here we have another style of baroque/romantic admixture, largely based on the Thuringian organ-builder's interpretation of the period, and which, in turn, was based on the baroque organs they knew back in Germany. The BIG difference was in the way the ENTIRE organ was designed to melt into a homogeneous whole, and on a Schulze organ, one simply adds stops....any stops....and it just gets louder. In effect, it was the forerunner of the great German romantic organs of Walcker and especially Steinmeyer.   Our American cousins benefitted tremendously from the work of T C Lewis (as they did from the Miles project and breaking the sound barrier....but let's not get tetchy!) for a famous visitor to the Southwark Cathedral organ was a certain Mr G.Donald-Harrison, who "probably" used this instrument as the basis for his own particular style of "American Classic". To this day, the American Classic remains a wonderful vehicle for REAL music making, and one which is an admixture of German baroque (at once removed) and Lewis, UK/Schulze style romanticism.   So that's a third way.   Now coming up to date a little, (and speaking only of the UK because I can't speak for anyone else), three golden opportunities presented themselves during the 1960's. The first was in the building of the new Coventry Cathedral, the second was in the re-ordering and enlargement of Blackburn Cathedral, and the third was in the building of the inverted funnel we now know as Paddy's Wigwam....Liverpool, Metropolitan RC cathedral.   Harrisons were allowed to have a stab at the first, and whilst they had built the organ of the Festival Hall, their wings were sufficiently clipped by an organ committtee, that they had to build a less severe organ more in keeping with middle-of-the-road Anglicanism, (and where did that disappear? You may well ask!)The end result is....erm....erm...Anglican. It is an organ which, like the Archbishop of Canterbury, sits on a fence and wobbles. It does nothing terribly well, but in fairness, absolutely nothing badly.   The RC wigwam, being built in the round, is an acoustic nightmare. The trebles hear themselves coming around for the n-th time in every anthem or chant, whilst the 40-part Tallis takes on a whole new musical life-form all its own. In spite of this, the organ, by J W Walker, works well enough to be interesting, but just falls short of being really exciting.   There was just window of opportunity left...Blackburn.   I here repeat what I have written before, but it is worth repeating I think.   The design for the new organ at Blackburn in 1968 (?) was brilliantly drawn up by the cathedral organist, John Bertalot and Dr Francis Jackson of York Minster. With the assistance and combined genius of Denys Thurlow and Walter Goody as voicers, the organ sought to do justice to most, if not all, styles of organ music within a very compact specification of around 60 stops.   What emerged was an organ which included a sensible Swell organ replete with a proper chorus, to which, via EP action, was tagged on a very fiery set of French reeds. The great is more or less conventional, with a full chorus up to Plein Jeu and a small trumpet. The positive is, essentially a sort of Dutch/German positive with an added Cromorne. Colour is provided by suitable flute mutations. The pedal, perhaps originally a little weak in fundamental, has a full flue chorus to Mixture, but then some fabulous reeds which are not heavyweight affairs at all. Nevertheless, they have just the right timbre for French Romantic music, but without the all-out power of Cavaille-Coll examples.   Of course, a stop-list is a stop-list is a stop-list!   NOTHING can compensate for bad voicing; not even a big acoustic such as Blackburn has. Put two incredibly able voicers to work, and the end result is nothing short of astounding.....truly one of the very finest organs in Europe, and for my money, tonally one of the top ten.   I believe this organ was a first, for it combined all the best elements of low pressure flue voicing with the panache of fiery French reeds; reeds which are perhaps more Cliquot than Cavaille-Coll. The whole thing is topped by a very fine chamade Trumpet; again quite fiery, and adding that bit of zazz to the full organ.   The lack of pedal gravity proved a bit of a problem, but this has been rectified in a recent re-built, with the addition of some heavyweight digital sonic-boom of the "Open Wood" type. It certainly works well enough, and has given the organ a sonority it perhaps lacked initially, even though proper pipes would have been better in the scheme of things.   This organ proves absolutely, that in favourable conditions, it is possible to merge both mild strings and celestes into an essentially classical scheme, and fiery chorus reeds with low pressure fluework.   Dare I....dare I....dare I say it?   I actually BELIEVE that the Blackburn instrument is a whole lot better than any Cavaille-Coll ever made, and at least as good tonally as anything by Silbermann, Riepp or Schnitger.   There! I dared to say it!     Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK                     --- Nathan Smith <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> wrote:   > > I was attempting to respond (when > my outgoing mail > capability came to an abrupt halt) to the thread on > mixing organs. I too > would be very interested in learning about such > organs that are nicely > blended between the 2 popular styles.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears http://launch.yahoo.com/promos/britneyspears/  
(back) Subject: Mixing Styles From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 09:45:49 -0600   Colin has submitted an interesting essay, but my question for him was for sources of details on these instruments. That, of course, means much more than a stoplist. Does anyone know? Thanks Roy Redman      
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: fires in So Cal (X-posted) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 08:21:22 -0800   The smoke and ash from the Rancho Cucamonga fire has reached us here in San Diego, more than a hundred miles south. The authorities have issued an alert for those with respiratory illnesses to stay indoors (this includes both Burgie and me). Ash is falling, and the sunlight is a sickly shade of orange. The house is closed up, but my eyes are already watering, and I can smell the smoke. I suppose if it gets bad enough, we'll have to take refuge in an air-conditioned supermarket, or the hospital.   Please pray for RAIN!   Bud      
(back) Subject: chiff From: "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 11:17:15 -0500   I'll come down on the other side, because I happen to like a bit of chiff.   Maybe it's not so good for Romantic music, but that makes it a preference, =   which hardly justifies the least responsible of the statements that have appeared in this thread.   Chiff is analogous to the percussive attack of a harpsichord. It = clarifies the articulation of Bach. Since the main reason to build an organ is to = articulate Bach, chiff is good.   So there.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: chiff From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 11:43:22 -0500   Greetings to All, I would also come down on the side of Chiff in agreement with Dick = Meckstroth. On certain instruments in certain places, the pronounced chiff gives warm = character and personality, and suggests antiquity in the Germanic tradition. It troubles me though that this thread has suggested that chiff is a = sign of less than vigilant voicing, and I know this is not the case in certain = instruments. If anyone one has heard the instruments voiced by our own Grandpa Arp = Schneider, you will experience chiff that has been carefully planned for and executed = in certain specific ranks. To my ear, it is a charming, almost haunting sound = when used in the appropriate literature, particularly in a liturgical = environment. I believe Grandpa Arp is a master of this voicing style as evidenced = particularly by his instruments at Farmer City and Quincy Illinois. Cheers Mike      
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: So Cal fires (X-posted) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:00:27 -0800   There are now FOUR HUGE out-of-control fires burning just to the NORTH of us here in SAN DIEGO, and one to the SOUTH. I don't know if they started from flying embers from the Rancho Cucamonga fire ... there are reports of "fire tornados" all over, spewing embers and ashes into the stratosphere.   It's quite dark here now. THIS all happened since 6 a.m. Pacific Time this morning.   People may not know that this is major "horse country," with many thoroughbred breeders and ranches ... people are scrambling to evacuate their horses to safe areas ... high school stadiums, the fairgrounds, the rodeo grounds, etc.   It's now being reported that there are NO water-drop helicopters or tankers AVAILABLE to send to San Diego ... they're all up north fighting THOSE fires.   Santa Ana winds off the desert are forecast for later today ... up to 50 miles an hour ... NOTHING can be done in the face of THOSE. They're like a BLOWTORCH.   We're in the center city, so we're RELATIVELY safe, but there are probably NO fire trucks left in the city proper ... we've been hearing them go out all morning. All we can do is watch for embers and wet down the roof.   Shelters are open, and the Red Cross is handing out face masks, but the outlying hospitals are swamped with burn victims.   This is AWFUL!       Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Mixing Styles From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:21:44 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Patience is a virtue!   I can't do everything at once.   Hold it right there.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Roy Redman <rredman@imagin.net> wrote: > Colin has submitted an interesting essay, but my > question for him was > for sources of details on these instruments.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears http://launch.yahoo.com/promos/britneyspears/  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: So Cal fires (X-posted) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:28:43 -0800 (PST)   Hello Bud,   This sounds really terrible, not to say frightening. We're thinking about you.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- quilisma@cox.net wrote: > There are now FOUR HUGE out-of-control fires burning > just to the NORTH > of us here in SAN DIEGO, and one to the SOUTH.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears http://launch.yahoo.com/promos/britneyspears/  
(back) Subject: So Cal fires (X-posted) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:56:20 -0800   San Bernardino, to the north and east of us, has now evacuated over 35,000 people.   The TV is now saying that they're evacuating parts of San Clemente and Camp Pendleton on the coast.   The California Highway Patrol has just issued an order for people to stay OFF freeways and major surface streets to keep them open for fire equipment.   I-15 is now closed. That's the major inland north-south artery from LA and the Inland Empire to San Diego.   We're having power outages, so I may not be able to report regularly.   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Mixing Styles From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 10:57:24 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   For the benfit of Roy Redman, Nate Smith and others who may be interested in web-sites, here are a few interesting links; one of which makes mention of the English/American infleunces, and which I havn't seen before.   http://www.ondar.demon.co.uk/echoes/spark.htm   http://www- users.york,ac.uk/~acd114/orgue/lib/letter.htm   http://www.musicalopinion.co./organ/st-mary-blackburn.htm   http://homepage.mac.com/glarehead/ambrosino/lecture-aio2998.html   http://freespace.virgin.net/andrew.carter/work99.html   http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~oneskull/3.6.2.htm     I will post these and then check that the links work, and if not, I will make any corrections necessary and try again!   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK         --- Roy Redman <rredman@imagin.net> wrote: > Colin has submitted an interesting essay, but my > question for him was > for sources of details on these instruments.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears http://launch.yahoo.com/promos/britneyspears/  
(back) Subject: Re: Mixing Styles From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 14:19:49 -0500     Colin Mitchell wrote as follows, - but none of the links qork for me!   Bob Conway     > Hello, > > For the benfit of Roy Redman, Nate Smith and others > who may be interested in web-sites, here are a few > interesting links; one of which makes mention of the > English/American infleunces, and which I havn't seen > before. > > http://www.ondar.demon.co.uk/echoes/spark.htm > > http://www- > users.york,ac.uk/~acd114/orgue/lib/letter.htm > > http://www.musicalopinion.co./organ/st-mary-blackburn.htm > > http://homepage.mac.com/glarehead/ambrosino/lecture-aio2998.html > > http://freespace.virgin.net/andrew.carter/work99.html > > http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~oneskull/3.6.2.htm > > > I will post these and then check that the links work, > and if not, I will make any corrections necessary and > try again! > > Regards, > Colin Mitchell UK