PipeChat Digest #3924 - Monday, September 1, 2003
 
Happy Labour Day
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Happy Labour Day
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Leather deterioration in NYC
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Limerick tune
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
St. Adalbert Wicks?
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Jazz on the "classic" pipe organ
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
And French romantic on the German Baroque organ
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
historic approach
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Bill Morton" <wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
organ leather
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
RE: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: historic approach
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: organ leather
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
RE:Jazz on the classical organ
  by <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Re: organ leather
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: historic approach
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: organ leather
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: RE:Jazz on the classical organ
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: historic approach
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: historic approach
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
IRC tonight
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Bill Morton" <wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com>
Re: historic approach
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Happy Labour Day From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 09:57:58 -0400   I shall not be able to be on IRC tonight, so I wish you all a Happy Labour =   Day right here!   Have Fun!   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Happy Labour Day From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 10:08:16 -0400   Labor Day? Ha! What's that? Some of us have class all day! But Happy Labor day to you too!   Shelley   Shelley E. Culver Box 1489 Westminster College New Wilmington, PA 16172 School #: 724.946.6912 Cell #: 716.450.3845 AIM: ShellBell0206 Email: culverse@westminster.edu >>> conwayb@sympatico.ca 09/01/03 9:57 AM >>> I shall not be able to be on IRC tonight, so I wish you all a Happy Labour Day right here!   Have Fun!   Bob Conway   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Leather deterioration in NYC From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 09:55:38 -0500       Bob Elms wrote:   > My son has just releathered a 1912 tubular pneumatic from a South > Australian Church. According to a date inside the chest it was last > done in 1930. That is over 70 years. Mind you it needed redoing. > Bob Elms. > > TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > >> There are pipe organs from the same era (1920s) in NYC that >> operated on their original leather for 70 or more years before being >> releathered. GOOD leather lasts 50-70 years, even in this city. >> Leather costs less than junking an organ and buying a replacement >> that lasts half as long. > Here in Missouri we have just finished releathering a Hinners organ from 1925 which was still on its original leather, which would be nearly 80 years. Even then it might have gone another five years, but as we had to remove and reinstall it anyway because the church was being remodeled, it seemed sensible to releather it now and save the church a lot of money dismantling it again later on. It was originally in another church, where the new Moller organ that replaced it was built with perflex, so had to be releathered years before it was!   The worst leather was in the period c. 1945-1980, before people like Harley Piltingsrud got involved in trying to improve things, so hopefully today's organ leather will last substantially longer than it was doing in the third quarter of the twentieth century.   Other factors are also involved besides the quality of the leather. One problem is that sloppy employees sometimes failed to make sure that the glue at the edges of the pouch hole was not sharp, and sometimes good quality leather has a short life because the glue cuts through and makes holes. Moller and Aeolian-Skinner were particularly bad at this in the period around 1958-68.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Limerick tune From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 12:59:16 -0500   With attribution to Johnny Carson, "I did not know that."   But now I do--and I am glad (with attribution to H.H. Parry).   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower ___________________ Subject: Re: IRC tonight From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:24:59 EDT   In a message dated 8/29/03 7:20:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << "there was a young man from Nantucket" >>   Speaking of which, did you know that any limerick can be sung to the tune "Dennis"?? ("Blest be the tie that binds" for those who don't recognize hymn tune names)      
(back) Subject: St. Adalbert Wicks? From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 13:08:15 -0500   That's a big Wicks installation, isn't it?   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower   -----Original Message-----   > Well it's absolutely wonderful--a dream come true. Question: what is > the signature piece I hear when it first comes on, with the trumpet stop? > Randy Runyon     The background music on the preroll piece heard when connecting to ORGANLive is a snippet of an improvisation by Jonathan A. Tuuk on the organ of St. Adalbert's Cathedral in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The entire recording can be heard within the broacast. Brent Johnson        
(back) Subject: Jazz on the "classic" pipe organ From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 14:30:04 -0400   Some weeks or months ago there was a thread about jazz on the pipe organ. = I just ran onto some online recordings that may be of interest. Check out Roberto Bertero's page at http://members.xoom.virgilio.it/bertero. He has a list of 25 complete = works in MP3 format for free downloading - mostly classical/romantic, but including Monk's 'Round = Midnight and Gersh's Rhapsody in Blue. Now for me, calling Rhapsody in Blue "jazz" is like calling Gummy Worms = "fruit", but there it is for what it is. Round Midnight is as bona fida a jazz tune as you can get. Bertero's = registrations are sometimes astonishing (e.g., a voxy krummhorn with tremulant for the exposition of = the Bach CM fugue BWV 547), but always colorful and resfreshing, I think. YMMV.   Cheers, WG      
(back) Subject: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 14:41:20 -0400   Yesterday I attended the last of this year's summer recitals on the 4/97 = Von Beckerath tracker (with one partially expressive division) at St. Paul's Cathedral here in Pittsburgh. = It was an all Widor program performed by Dr. David Billings, including the complete 5th Symphonie, and = I expected a bizzare experience. I was pleasantly surprised at how appropriate a sound David was able to = get out of the very Germanic instrument. It wasn't a C-C, but the spirit was there nonetheless.   Dr. Yoder - were you there? What did you think?   -WG      
(back) Subject: historic approach From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:06:07 -0500 (CDT)     The whole point of an "historic approach" is not to show people "the only way"... it is impossible to make such a claim. The historic approach is a way to gain some new insight into the music. From personal experience, I can tell you that it does indeed make a difference even on modern instruments.   When I started my graduate studies in 1973, my teacher (who had studied with Walcha) was not familiar with the fingerings, the phrasings, etc, that had been rediscovered. Yes, the results can be duplicated by modern fingerings, but it's an interesting exercise to try the old technique. My teacher heard the difference even on the Aeolian-Skinner that was our recital instrument, and he was intrigued.   On the other hand, he had a colossal fit when I approached the Mendelssohn 6th with the historic perspective - no use of crescendo pedal, registrations that didn't require 1000's of piston changes, little rubato - this all from studying the organs Mendelssohn wrote for and reading his comments about the excesses of other players. Well, I played it in a masterclass for Arthur Poister who said it wasn't what he was expecting, but it was fresh and he rather liked it!!   And lastly, what is "up-to- date" about our instruments? They are reflecting the influence of research into the 19th century and earlier. Look how far we've come from the mistaken ideas of early organs that created the neo-Baroque movement. People have learned a lot since then. Now the current fad is French Symphonic or English "cathedral" design. Who cares...as long as it leaves us with instruments that are built well, artistically coherent, and have sounds of beauty. It's the push to be "up-to-date" that has destroyed thousands of historic instruments of all periods, plus produced mongrels that later needed replacing if restoration was impossible.   I don't consider myself an "academic", but someone who wants to keep learning until I'm in the grave. Even Marie-Claire redid her phenomenal recordings of Bach's works after gaining new insights.    
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Bill Morton" <wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 13:40:46 -0700   At 08:05 PM 8/28/2003 -0500, you wrote: >Ladies and Gentlemen, > >I'd like to invite you to tune into ORGANLive, the best source of organ >music on the web.     I tried this service, and was pretty disappointed.   1st time, it allowed me access to the organ music, but interrupted it = every 5 or 10 minutes with either screen popups or audio popups. When I finally =   gave up after about an hour of music, there were 8, (count 'em) popup windows behind the main screen which I had to get rid of immediately, plus two more that came up within the next half-hour with no keyboard input! In other words, the level of commercial interruptions renders the site essentially worthless.   I tried again 3 hours later; now it won't even play anything; if you tell it to "LISTEN NOW" all you get is a screen trying to sell you the subscription to LIVE365. There appears to be no way to get around this.            
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 16:42:39 EDT   In a message dated 9/1/2003 3:41:14 PM Central Daylight Time, wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com writes:   I tried this service, and was pretty disappointed.   1st time, it allowed me access to the organ music, but interrupted it = every 5 or 10 minutes with either screen popups or audio popups. When I finally = gave up after about an hour of music, there were 8, (count 'em) popup windows behind the main screen which I had to get rid of immediately, plus two more that came up within = the next half-hour with no keyboard input! In other words, the level of = commercial interruptions renders the site essentially worthless. Get norton firewall and block pop ups...I have not had a problem.   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: organ leather From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:45:46 -0500   List, We had the Henry Pilcher's Sons tubular pneumatic Organ rebuilt = here at St. John's in Bradford, Il. When we took the chests out, we = noticed that the primaries were built out of Kangaroo leather and looked = as clean as could be from 1922. The lead tubing etc was a different = story. Here in the farmlands of Illinois, the air is still clean and = leather obviously lasts a long time. Gary  
(back) Subject: RE: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:47:07 -0500   You can also register for the premium, ad-free version, for a small fee. As a sponsor, I've been very pleased with the launch and haven't been troubled by the occasional spoken or visual distraction.   =20   Peter   =20   -----Original Message----- From: Gfc234@aol.com [mailto:Gfc234@aol.com]=20 Sent: Monday, September 01, 2003 3:43 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post   =20   In a message dated 9/1/2003 3:41:14 PM Central Daylight Time, wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com writes:   =09 I tried this service, and was pretty disappointed. =09 1st time, it allowed me access to the organ music, but interrupted it every 5 or 10 minutes with either screen popups or audio popups. When I finally gave up after about an hour of music, there were 8, (count 'em) popup windows behind the main screen which I had to get rid of immediately, plus two more that came up within the next half-hour with no keyboard input! In other words, the level of commercial interruptions renders the site essentially worthless.   Get norton firewall and block pop ups...I have not had a problem.   =20   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com <http://gfc234@aol.com/>=20      
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 13:57:53 -0700   Odd ... I DIDN'T buy a premium membership, and had NONE of those problems, but I entered through   http://www.live365.com/stations/organistbrent?play   Playing right now, no problem, no popups.   Cheers,   Bud   Bill Morton wrote: > At 08:05 PM 8/28/2003 -0500, you wrote: > >> Ladies and Gentlemen, >> >> I'd like to invite you to tune into ORGANLive, the best source of organ >> music on the web. > > > > I tried this service, and was pretty disappointed. > > 1st time, it allowed me access to the organ music, but interrupted it > every 5 or 10 minutes with either screen popups or audio popups. When I =   > finally gave up after about an hour > of music, there were 8, (count 'em) popup windows behind the main screen =   > which I had to get rid of immediately, plus two more that came up within =   > the next half-hour with no keyboard input! In other words, the level > of commercial interruptions renders the site essentially worthless. > > I tried again 3 hours later; now it won't even play anything; if you > tell it to "LISTEN NOW" all you get is a screen trying to sell you the > subscription to LIVE365. There appears to be no way to get around this. > > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 16:55:03 -0400   On 9/1/03 4:06 PM, "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> wrote:   > People have learned a lot since [the neo-Baroque movement].   Well, "some" people. I'm still stuck at about 1957. (Maybe loosening up = a LITTLE bit.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:57:01 -0500   Just the once-an-hour ad for an Oreck vacuum cleaner and a similar promo for LIVE365 -- small issues in the larger scheme of things.   Peter=20   Bud wrote:   Playing right now, no problem, no popups.   Cheers,   Bud   Bill Morton wrote: > At 08:05 PM 8/28/2003 -0500, you wrote: >=20 >> Ladies and Gentlemen, >> >> I'd like to invite you to tune into ORGANLive, the best source of organ >> music on the web.=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > I tried this service, and was pretty disappointed. >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: organ leather From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 17:02:44 -0400   I find this very interesting from a historical perspective. How did you discern it to be Kangaroo?     Jim       On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:45:46 -0500 "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> writes: List, We had the Henry Pilcher's Sons tubular pneumatic Organ rebuilt here at St. John's in Bradford, Il. When we took the chests out, we noticed that the primaries were built out of Kangaroo leather and looked as clean as could be from 1922. The lead tubing etc was a different story. Here in the farmlands of Illinois, the air is still clean and leather obviously lasts a long time. Gary  
(back) Subject: RE:Jazz on the classical organ From: <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 17:50:58 -0400   For a real treat, get the CD by Wayne Marshall playing Gershwin, Bernstein = and others on the C. B. Fisk at the Meyerson Center in Dallas, on Virgin = Classics. It is amazing.   Robert Ehrhardt Noel Memorial UMC Shreveport, LA USA http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html      
(back) Subject: Re: organ leather From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 17:14:00 -0500   HI Jim, I guess the way that it was determinded that it was Kangaroo was = that it was heavier than most and very white and was used then. Hope = this helps. Anymore comments on Kangaroo leather would be welcomed. Gary ----- Original Message -----=20 From: James R McFarland=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Cc: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, September 01, 2003 4:02 PM Subject: Re: organ leather     I find this very interesting from a historical perspective. How did = you discern it to be Kangaroo?     Jim       On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:45:46 -0500 "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> = writes: List, We had the Henry Pilcher's Sons tubular pneumatic Organ = rebuilt here at St. John's in Bradford, Il. When we took the chests out, = we noticed that the primaries were built out of Kangaroo leather and = looked as clean as could be from 1922. The lead tubing etc was a = different story. Here in the farmlands of Illinois, the air is still = clean and leather obviously lasts a long time. Gary    
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 17:23:26 -0500   Hello, PipeChat-ers, et al: Historic approach, ...hummmmmmmmmmm...sol, fa, mi, re, do... I was reminded of some research (historic approach) into some of the popular literature. Supposedly, ...according to Dr. Austin Lovelace, the original version of the Widor "Toccata" was to be played at a relatively leisurely pace, ....especially compared with contemporary renderings. The stated reason was the reverberation times were so long in those large French cathedrals. At the tempi we hear the Widor "Toccata" today the arpeggios would became a "musical mush." Again, relatively speaking, if we insisted on the Widor "Toccata" being played as originally rendered, what an everlasting endurance it would be for the listeners in our modern churches with relatively dry acoustics, especially when compared with the original environments of France. I think, ...my own opinion, there is a better rendering at a relatively quicker tempo, as exhibited by most of the performers of the latter half of the 20th Century. Of that bunch, some were extremely fast, some marginally slow, and a few got it just right for a moment in time. In my opinion, let me have the more modern interpretations (a la, tempo rendered) over "historic approach." What became of the concept of playing to what the room acoustics will allow? F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..   Terry Hicks wrote: > > The whole point of an "historic approach" is not to show > people "the only way"... it is impossible to make such a > claim. The historic approach is a way to gain some new > insight into the music. From personal experience, I can > tell you that it does indeed make a difference even on > modern instruments. <snip> ..  
(back) Subject: Re: organ leather From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 18:25:47 -0400   Uh--IT HAD A POUCH?   Sorry Jim, I just couldn't resist. The devil made me do it. I think he was Tasmanian.   Mike (who's hopping on out of here to look for his mate)   James R McFarland wrote:   > I find this very interesting from a historical > perspective. How did you discern it to be > Kangaroo? Jim On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 15:45:46 -0500 > "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> writes: > > List, We had the Henry Pilcher's Sons > tubular pneumatic Organ rebuilt here at St. > John's in Bradford, Il. When we took the > chests out, we noticed that the primaries > were built out of Kangaroo leather and > looked as clean as could be from 1922. The > lead tubing etc was a different story. > Here in the farmlands of Illinois, the air > is still clean and leather obviously lasts > a long time. Gary >    
(back) Subject: Re: RE:Jazz on the classical organ From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2003 17:31:26 -0500   Hello, PipeChatters, et al: I was one of the first to recommend Wayne Marshall's rendering of Gershwin, Bernstein, et al, several months ago when Brian Fahey first raised the question. This is a moment-in-time rendering of some of the greatest "modern" music that deals more in feeling than in dissonance. I have the CD. Played it twice on one trip in my van recently. It's a great way to pass an hour and let the world go bye. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..   Robert Ehrnhardt wrote: > For a real treat, get the CD by Wayne Marshall playing > Gershwin, Bernstein and others on the C. B. Fisk at the > Meyerson Center in Dallas, on Virgin Classics. It is > amazing. > > Robert Ehrhardt > Noel Memorial UMC > Shreveport, LA USA > http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html > ..  
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 18:41:14 -0400   On 9/1/03 6:23 PM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > the reverberation times were so long in those large French cathedrals.   The technical/acoustic aspects of what you are saying are at least a bit over my head, but I certainly agree with what I think you're saying. Different ballpark, isn't it? (Think Fenway Park.)   But I'm not so sure about "those large French cathedrals." Aren't most = of them (involved in this consideration) not cathedrals at all? I suppose = one in Paris, and surely a few more (Rouen, etc.). But surely mostly not?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 16:40:58 -0700   Yeah, but ... parish churches in Paris like St. Sulpice or St. Denis or Sacre Coeur or La Trinite (the ones I've actually been in) are ALL larger than Smoky Mary's, by way of comparison.   Another point ... Barker levers simply won't "fire" as fast as some American organists play the Widor ... nor could the wind supply keep up. The short chord before the final chord (in some editions) is to set UP the wind ... the bellows collapse, then refill so that the last chord comes on like gangbusters. I haven't explained that very well, but that's the way it was explained to me (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote: > On 9/1/03 6:23 PM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote: > > >>the reverberation times were so long in those large French cathedrals. > > > The technical/acoustic aspects of what you are saying are at least a bit > over my head, but I certainly agree with what I think you're saying. > Different ballpark, isn't it? (Think Fenway Park.) > > But I'm not so sure about "those large French cathedrals." Aren't most = of > them (involved in this consideration) not cathedrals at all? I suppose = one > in Paris, and surely a few more (Rouen, etc.). But surely mostly not? > > Alan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: IRC tonight From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 16:44:00 -0700   For those who arent' stuffing face with BBQ and/or watching fireworks (grin), IRC is at 9 p.m. tonight, US Eastern Daylight Time.   Directions:   http://www.pipechat.org/irc.html   See you there!   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Bill Morton" <wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 16:45:36 -0700   At 01:57 PM 9/1/2003 -0700, you wrote: >Odd ... I DIDN'T buy a premium membership, and had NONE of those = problems, >but I entered through > >http://www.live365.com/stations/organistbrent?play > >Playing right now, no problem, no popups.     Odd, Bud; I just tried again and it comes up demanding that I subscribe to =   Live365 and won't let me around that screen. Oh well, the mysteries of the NET and Windows, I guess. BTW, glad you found a house in SD. I = used to live down there and work out on Point Loma at the Navy facility there. Nice town.      
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 19:46:47 -0400   On 9/1/03 7:40 PM, "quilisma@cox.net" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Yeah, but ... parish churches in Paris like St. Sulpice or St. Denis or > Sacre Coeur or La Trinite (the ones I've actually been in) are ALL > larger than Smoky Mary's, by way of comparison.   "Yeah, but ..." as you say. Smoky Mary's isn't a cathedral either. = Anyway, I know whatcha mean. > > Another point ... Barker levers simply won't "fire" as fast as some > American organists play the Widor ... nor could the wind supply keep up. > The short chord before the final chord (in some editions) is to set UP > the wind ... the bellows collapse, then refill so that the last chord > comes on like gangbusters. I haven't explained that very well, but > that's the way it was explained to me (chuckle).   And to my ASTONISHMENT, I even understand THAT idea!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 16:52:14 -0700   Yeah, you have to subscribe, but it's free for the basic membership, as I recall.   San Diego is SO KEWL after six years behind the Orange Curtain (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Bill Morton wrote: > At 01:57 PM 9/1/2003 -0700, you wrote: > >> Odd ... I DIDN'T buy a premium membership, and had NONE of those >> problems, but I entered through >> >> http://www.live365.com/stations/organistbrent?play >> >> Playing right now, no problem, no popups. > > > > Odd, Bud; I just tried again and it comes up demanding that I subscribe > to Live365 and won't let me around that screen. Oh well, the mysteries =   > of the NET and Windows, I guess. BTW, glad you found a house in SD. > I used to live down there and work out > on Point Loma at the Navy facility there. Nice town. >