PipeChat Digest #3927 - Tuesday, September 2, 2003
 
Re: Of cabbages & kings...& modern/historical tempi
  by <MMccal7284@aol.com>
Bridlington Priory - longest windchest in Europe
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ
  by "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net>
Chimes
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Home Organ Project - Update
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Bill Morton" <wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com>
Re: Chimes
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re:Chimes and nit-picking
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
Re: Preservation/Destruction of Organs
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Chimes
  by "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Re: Chimes
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Ligeti's Volumina
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: St Ann & Holy Trinity; was Romantic beasts in NYC
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Chimes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Introducing ORGANLive  x-post
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Re: Chimes
  by <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Of cabbages & kings...& modern/historical tempi From: <MMccal7284@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 06:30:49 EDT   Hi, List ~ Having been a lurker here for approximately two months, it's time for = me to hop on the bench and thank you all for much great information plus some =   light-hearted fun! Both have been a major encouragement in urging me back = into the "church music business" after a very long hiatus due to serious = illness. Presently, would like to say "kudos" to our Terry Hicks for the post = below, especially the last paragraph. The latter goes right along with the wee = gem of advice that Dr. Roberta Gary at U.C.-C.C.M. was always so wont to give us = when we'd get our ankles and knees in knots over this or that performance issue...."get over it." (Dr. Gary has LOTS of great wee gems of advice!) = Indeed, none of us have all the answers; many of us are still searching and learning. = Thanks, Terry, for the reminder! A special "hi" to Bud....so glad the move is completed and that you've =   lived to tell the tale! A blessed Martyrs of New Guinea Feast Day to you all ~ MaryLee McCallister ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Subject: modern/historical tempi From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>   If you read my comments carefully and have followed the discussion, neither I nor anyone has advocated being a slave to history, especially regarding tempi. No matter what literature you play, the acoustics and the capabilities of the organ are going to determine a "successful" choice of tempo. However, knowing that the Widor toccata was played slower should be noted. Even in a room with no reverberation, playing the toccata a little slower can give that old warhorse added majesty...but it's a tricky balancing act. I have heard it played slower on dull instruments in spaces that are "acoustically challenged" and the result was booorrrring.   The articles in the American Organist magazine about some tempi markings perhaps being wrong due to different placement of the metronome weight is fascinating. Talk about changing long held beliefs!   Once more...there's a difference between claiming historically "correct" and historically "informed" performances. One has all the answers; the other is still searching.  
(back) Subject: Bridlington Priory - longest windchest in Europe From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 04:28:56 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Recently, I sent an ill-researched post (I do that sort of thing from time to time) about the Anneessens/Compton/Nicholson organ at Bridlington Priory; claiming that the organ contained the longest wind-chest in Europe.   I now know why!   I don't know whether the arrangement is unique, even for Anneessens, but apparently, the Great/Choir (now called Positive) windchest is indeed a shared one as I suggested.   HOWEVER!   It seems that the wind-chest is more or less double length for the following reason:-   The chest is divided as normal, but the note arrangement is quite peculiar.   Instead of the choir organ ranks being placed BEHIND the Great organ, the chest note layout goes:-   CC (Gt) CC# (Gt) CC (Ch) CC# (Ch) DD (Gt) DD# (Gt) DD (Ch) DD# (Ch) etc etc Obviously, this suggests that the original Choir organ was an unenclosed division, and the action sliderless; possibly working on a very early electric action which, if I recall correctly, safely pre-dates Hope Jones. Anneessens used the Scmoele & Mols patented electric action which dates, I believe, from 1884, just five years before the organ at Bridlington was built in, I believe 1889.   I suspect that part of the success of Anneessens in the UK, was the use of this revolutionary action.   Unfortunately, Anneessens turned the electric action to his advantage, for on some instruments he would have stops of dissimilar name on Great and Choir which were actually the SAME; thus causing some outrage among the organ fraternity of the day.   I hope this clarifies my earlier posting on the subject.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     PS: The Fish & Chips in Bridlington are superb!         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ From: "Mark & Cinda Towne" <mstowne@concentric.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 07:53:33 -0700   Good morning esteemed Pipechatters,   Hope that the Labor day holiday was wonderful.   Here in Las Vegas, we are about nine months away from the arrival of the = new 53-rank von Beckerath to be installed in the 299 seat Doc Rando recital = hall in the Beam Music Center on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.   I have had the pleasure to meet and speak at length with the two fine gentlemen that are the principals of the Firm, Holger Redlich and Rolf = Miell at the dedication of thier instrument at Holy Cross Lutheran Church (MS) = in Wichita, Kansas just about a year ago. This instrument in Wichita is also of a french design with wonderful and impressive results.   We are looking forward to the installation of our new instrument...it will be the largest organ in the state of Nevada.   Everybody have a great week.   Regards,   Mark S. Towne Las Vegas, NV       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Walter Greenwood Sent: Monday, September 01, 2003 11:41 AM To: PipeChat Subject: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ     Yesterday I attended the last of this year's summer recitals on the 4/97 = Von Beckerath tracker (with one partially expressive division) at St. Paul's Cathedral here in Pittsburgh. It was an all Widor program performed by Dr. David Billings, including the complete 5th Symphonie, and = I expected a bizzare experience. I was pleasantly surprised at how appropriate a sound David was able to = get out of the very Germanic instrument. It wasn't a C-C, but the spirit was there nonetheless.   Dr. Yoder - were you there? What did you think?   -WG     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Chimes From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 08:48:34 -0500   Two suggestions:   1) Use handbells. American bells are manufactured by either Schulmerich = or Malmark; Whitechapel bells are manufactured in England.   To be more authentic, try to locate a set of Petit & Fritzen (manufactured in the Netherlands). These bells are tuned like a carillon, including the minor tierce.   2) Use handchimes, manufactured in Schulmerich, Malmark, and Suzuki.   Best wishes,   Tom Gregory -- Thomas and Patricia Gregory 716 West College Avenue Waukesha WI USA 53186-4569  
(back) Subject: Home Organ Project - Update From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 12:25:16 EDT   List,   Well, I've actually set some things into motion to get my organ project underway big time. I've said before that I will probably have to get some =   professional help (maybe even psychiatric by the time it's all over).   I'm relieved that we've finally gotten the stoplist worked out. Now, I'm agonizing over the differing opinions I'm getting on the use of a static = phase converter for my 220v 2hp 3-phase blower. I'm sure that, when that gets resolved, I'll find something to worry about until the organ is playing.   A couple weeks ago, I loaded up 12 pipe crates into the back of a U-Haul trailer, and my wife and I drove 10 hrs to Richard Schneider's shop in = Kenney, Ill. During our visit with Rich and Joan, we visited one of Rich's organs = in Quincy, Ill, and a tracker in Farmer City. These two are featured on a CD = of his entitled "A Tale of Two Organs". Both were beautiful, but the tracker was = my favorite.   The next day, we played around with some voicing of my pipes to see what could be done. He cut one of my "Octave" pipes thru the mouth and = resoldered it to lower the cut-up. I think it's going to come together nicely.   Although I posted it last September when I got the organ home, I will = repeat the stoplist of the organ as it was when I got it:   GREAT: 8' Geigen Diapason 8' Melodia 8' Dulciana 4' Octave - unified to 4 - 2 2/3 - 2 - and mixture. 4' Harmonic Flute   These were originally 73 pipe ranks. The top octave of each was saved in = a box.   SWELL: 8' Stopped Flute - 85 pipes unified to the hilt. 8' Aeoline 4' Viol 8' Oboe 8' Vox in a Box   Our idea was to put the Viol back to the 8' pitch and to use the Dulciana = as the Celeste. The mouths were so narrow that we considered it more cost effective to find a matched pair of Salicional + Celeste from Rich's = inventory.   The Aeoline will be cut down to a Terz 1 3/5.   The Geigen Diapason will be moved to the Swell.   The 8' Flute for the Great will come from a 4' Rohrflote from Rich's inventory using the bottom octave from my Melodia.   The remainder of the Melodia will become the 4' Hohlflote - the 4' Great Flute.   The 4' Octave (added to the organ in the 1960's. It had been a pedal stop = at some time in an organ even before that) will be cut to lower the cut up = and will remain as the 4' Octave. Rich will find an 8' Open Diapason for the Great.   Anyway, here is the new stoplist:   GREAT: on 5 rank pitman chest 8' Principal - from Schneider inventory 8' Rohrflote - 1-12 from Melodia, 13-61 from Schneider inventory. 8' Salicional (from swell) 8' Celeste T.C. (from swell) 4' Octave - from original Octave, cut up lowered. 4' Hohlflote - from 13-73 of former Melodia 2' Geigen principal - from Swell 8' Clarinet - from Schneider inventory. MIDI Swell to Great Great Unison Off   SWELL: on a few unit chests. 16' Bourdon - extension of Stopped Flute 8' Geigen Principal - formerly Great diapason 8' Stopped Flute - revoiced 8' Salicional - from Schneider inventory 8' Celeste T.C. - from Schneider inventory 4' Geigen principal - extension 4' Harmonic Flute - moved from Great division 4' Salicet - extension of Salicional 2 2/3' Nazard - extension of Stopped Flute 2' Harmonic Flute 1 3/5' Terz - from cut down Aeoline 16' Contra Oboe - extension of Oboe - need to find these. 8' Oboe 4' Haubois - extension MIDI Swell 4' Swell Unison Off   PEDAL: 16' Bourdon - 12 pipes 8' Geigen principal - from Swell 8' Bourdon - from Swell 8' Salicional - from Swell 4' Choral Bass - from Swell Geigen 4' Stopped Flute - ext 2' Harmonic Flute - from Swell 16' Contra Oboe - from Swell 4' Schalmei - from Swell Oboe MIDI Swell to Pedal Great to Pedal   So far, I'm leaning towards the Opus-Two switching system. I will be = selling off my relay panels. The MIDI capability for now will be used for sequencing. Maybe later I can add a sound module to have the MIDI voices = available to be played thru the organ.   I am installing some used SAMs that I purchased thru keyboardtrader.   I need to find the bottom octave of a 16' Contra Oboe.   I'm hoping that Rich will have the pipes finished - and I will have the chests hooked up - so that I can have the organ playing by Christmas.   Sincerely, Keith Zimmerman Commerce, Georgia    
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Bill Morton" <wjmwjm@mail.asisna.com> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 09:26:12 -0700   At 01:15 AM 9/2/2003 -0500, you wrote:   >Bill, I agree with you on the pop-ups and commercials. It's gotten worse =   >since I first discovered Live365. I have been using a Google toolbar >installed in my browser for some time, and the latest version of it has a =   >very excellent pop-up blocker. It does a good job of stopping pop-up >windows during the ORGANLive broadcast, while still allowing pop-ups that =   >web designers write into the functionality of their sites. Best of all, >it's free, although it only works with IE 5 or above. You can get it at ><http://toolbar.google.com/>http://toolbar.google.com/.   Brent Thanks. I've downloaded the google toolbar and will try it today. May be =   that is the solution. Thank you, also, for providing the Organlive feeds; sounds = like a lot of work went into this, and here I am complaining before it is really on the air <g>. The sound quality, by the way, is excellent, and I have not experienced = any dropouts over my 512K DSL line.   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 12:41:04 -0500   Has anyone on the list run across a really decent set of bell/chime/carillon samples for MIDI? They appear to have everything else including some really obscure historical and ethnic instruments, but bell samples seem to be rare.   Russ       On Monday, September 1, 2003, at 09:15 PM, quilisma@cox.net wrote:   > Eric, if you can think fast, playing > > e - c - g - c - f ON the chime sound will give you a synthetic middle > C ... just lock your hands in that position and play (chuckle) > > WORKS! > > Bud > > Eric McKirdy wrote: >> I have a Yamaha keyboard with an okay Bell sound, but I'd really like >> the >> real deal if possible. Not only for the sound, but also for the >> ambience and >> authenticity. >> On 9/1/03 6:16 PM, Keys4bach@aol.com said something about: >>> MIDI anyone? >>> >>> dale in Florida >>>    
(back) Subject: Re:Chimes and nit-picking From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 12:44:44 -0500     > Eric McKirdy writes: > > Both of these would benefit from real, honest-to-goodness > chimes. You know, the kind which are vertical, and struck with a > mallet at > the top of each chime.   Actually -- I hope I am informing, rather than nit-picking -- lord knows we all do enough of the later, but I find it interesting that a group of organists was satisfied with Eric's definition of "real, honest-to-goodness chimes."   "Real, honest-to-goodness chimes." would actually be as small set of cast-bronze bells -- usually an octave or 15 or so -- played from a chimestand. Such a chime would usually, out of necessity, be mounted in a tower.   A chimestand is a clavier not unlike that of a carillon clavier, but the keys tend to be much larger and vertical -- hinged at the bottom -- and pulled towards the player to strike the bell. If a chime grows large enough -- that is, has more bells -- it becomes a carillon, and usually gets a standard carillon clavier. The Guild of Carilloneurs of North America (GCNA) has standards that define the differences between a chime and a carillon (I think it is 25 bells, but I might be mistaken. I'm not a member and don't have a reference handy)   The tubular chimes were invented to simulate the sound of a real chime, but at lower cost with less space required. (does this sound familiar?) Tubular chimes are now accepted as chimes by most people these days. I have a set on the organ at my church as well as a Schulmerich imitation (3rd generation - an imitation of an imitation.)   I know that there are many sets of "real, honest-to-goodness chimes." in places around the USA. I have only played one. That set was in the large Episcopal church in Philadelphia which has recently been designated the Cathedral for the Diocese of Pennsylvania -- I can't remember what the parish was called before that (I think something like Holy Savior.) They have a set cast by Meneely of Watervalet NY which was playable as late as the 70's. I know there is a set at the First Methodist Church in Mishawaka IN near where I was raised.   Sometime in the 20th century, Degan introduced an instrument they called "Tower Chimes" which were actually very large tubular chimes, designed for outdoor, or tower installations. The Wannamaker Grand Court Organ has a set of these _inside_! Perhaps someone on this list knows the history of tubular chimes and organs and how they became associated together in the USA.   I also remember reading that J.S. Bach, in the capacity of an organ consultant, specified a stop on the pedal division of one organ, to consist of a set of small cast-bronze bells. The US organbuilder Hendrickson has installed such a stop on the Positiv of one of his small organs in a Unitarian church somewhere near Minneapolis.         My memories may not be accurate, but they are definitely true! Larry Wheelock  
(back) Subject: Re: Preservation/Destruction of Organs From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 13:57:57 -0400   > I also recall the Dean of the Cathedral in Portland, ME, beginning his > sermon at a wonderful Evensong we had at our convention there in 1992: > It was something like: "It is to the fact that this has been a somewhat > impoverished area for many years that you owe the opportunity to see and > hear all these wonderful old Organs."   Australia rejoices in a treasure of organs from the Victorian era for = pretty much the same reason. Until recently, there weren't funds to replace them = so continued to make do with what they had. When I was last there 2 years = ago, I was told that the Australian government had started to subsidize = restoration of these gems and recognizes them as jewels of their national heritage.   Any of our friends from down-under care to comment? Bob? Others?   And if there is anyone near North Sydney, could you get me some info and comments on the organ at Christ Church Lavender Bay? It's a smallish but charming organ and they weren't really sure _who_ built it, though Walker = was the leading contender for the title, and should have been refurbished last =   year.   Cheers, TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes From: "G. Deboer" <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 13:09:12 -0500   Johannus has excellent sound samples in their Sound Module CSM 128, there are various bells, chimes and one very realistic carillon.   Gary   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 12:41 PM Subject: Re: Chimes     > Has anyone on the list run across a really decent set of > bell/chime/carillon samples for MIDI? They appear to have everything > else including some really obscure historical and ethnic instruments, > but bell samples seem to be rare. > > Russ > > > > On Monday, September 1, 2003, at 09:15 PM, quilisma@cox.net wrote: > > > Eric, if you can think fast, playing > > > > e - c - g - c - f ON the chime sound will give you a synthetic middle > > C ... just lock your hands in that position and play (chuckle) > > > > WORKS! > > > > Bud > > > > Eric McKirdy wrote: > >> I have a Yamaha keyboard with an okay Bell sound, but I'd really like > >> the > >> real deal if possible. Not only for the sound, but also for the > >> ambience and > >> authenticity. > >> On 9/1/03 6:16 PM, Keys4bach@aol.com said something about: > >>> MIDI anyone? > >>> > >>> dale in Florida > >>> > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 11:39:07 -0700   That's probably because bell sounds are the most difficult to replicate .... Allen's alterables were quite decent, even for other percussions, but the bells were awful ... and the bells on most MIDI keyboards aren't much better.   Cheers,   Bud   Russ Greene wrote: > Has anyone on the list run across a really decent set of > bell/chime/carillon samples for MIDI? They appear to have everything > else including some really obscure historical and ethnic instruments, > but bell samples seem to be rare. > > Russ > > > > On Monday, September 1, 2003, at 09:15 PM, quilisma@cox.net wrote: > >> Eric, if you can think fast, playing >> >> e - c - g - c - f ON the chime sound will give you a synthetic middle >> C ... just lock your hands in that position and play (chuckle) >> >> WORKS! >> >> Bud >> >> Eric McKirdy wrote: >> >>> I have a Yamaha keyboard with an okay Bell sound, but I'd really like >>> the >>> real deal if possible. Not only for the sound, but also for the >>> ambience and >>> authenticity. >>> On 9/1/03 6:16 PM, Keys4bach@aol.com said something about: >>> >>>> MIDI anyone? >>>> >>>> dale in Florida >>>> > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: RE: Ligeti's Volumina From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 14:40:51 -0400   >> Larry Phelps designed an anti-Ligeti device in the organ he=20 >> built for Oral=20 >> Roberts U..   >you sure it wasn't an anti-oral device??   While liking much of Ligeti's music ever since first encountering it as = an undergrad in the 1960s, I'm so averse to Volumina as to think that = the title "Bulimia" would be just as apt.   In which case there isn't much difference in the function of the device = :-)    
(back) Subject: RE: St Ann & Holy Trinity; was Romantic beasts in NYC From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 14:48:25 -0400   >The organ truly is a huge beast in the rear gallery, party horn and = all. =20 It may be one of the few unaltered E.M. Skinners around any more.   >david baker   Didn't Virgil record the Reubke on this instrument in the late 1960s (in = addition to his recording at the Hammond Castle)?    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 15:13:29 EDT   In a message dated 9/2/2003 2:35:29 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > Has anyone on the list run across a really decent set of > >bell/chime/carillon samples for MIDI   ROLAND has the better stuff most recently from Handbells to tolling tower chimes.   good luck   dale in florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Introducing ORGANLive x-post From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 15:35:56 -0400   At 01:15 AM 9/2/03 -0500, it was written;   >I tried this service, and was pretty disappointed.   Go to it by clicking on this link: http://www.live365.com/stations/organistbrent?play   I bookmarked this link in my Favourites and it works fine, - no signing = in, no messing, just plays right away.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 15:16:09 -0500   Hello, Mark, et al:   I was quickened by the size of this instrument and the size of the hall. Of course, the relationship between size of the hall and the size of the organ can be explained on the basis of its intended use. This is a recital hall organ in a university setting. I think I understand that.   Another fellow and I were laboring over placing large organs in small halls just last week. Let me digress.   For as long as I have been around, the age-old guide for sizing a pipe organ was 3 or 4 complete ranks of pipes (counting mixtures as 1 rank) per 100 seats in a hall. So, with that in mind, the hall justifies only 9 to 12 ranks of pipes.   In another setting, about 10 years ago, I published a paper in which I explained these practices to a general audience who had little or no reason to have been exposed to traditional pipe organ sizing methods. That paper was sorely denounced by a couple of associates and legal action was threatened if I persisted in advancing such ideas. I chose to cease and desist, both with my traditional ways of thinking and those people as associates in business.   Am I correct in saying that a hall seating only 299 people would probably not justify a 53-rank organ in any setting other than a university recital hall? I think so.   Oh, I know that there have been organs built for those with ample cash in hand to spend on luxury items for their private privilege, but those are (as always) exceptions to the generally accepted ways/methods of doing business, ...in this case designing, installing, and tonally finishing pipe organs.   What efforts do the von Beckerath people offer to scale this "French" organ (in my mind, French and large stone churches go together) to such a small space? Will it be scaling, regulation, or some other enhancement that will contain so much organ is so small a space? I'm curious, very curious.   I look forward eagerly to your reply and, even more so, your future reports on the results of the new organ in the Doc Rando hall at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.   Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt     ..   - - - - -   > Here in Las Vegas, we are about nine months away from the > arrival of the new 53-rank von Beckerath to be installed > in the 299 seat Doc Rando recital hall in the Beam Music > Center on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las > Vegas.   * * *   > Regards, > > Mark S. Towne > Las Vegas, NV    
(back) Subject: Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 17:07:45 -0400   On 9/2/03 4:16 PM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > I look forward eagerly to your reply [about ratio between size of room = and number of ranks in an organ: 100 seats get 3-4 complete ranks].   I look forward to that as well. My college auditorium held 1200, and the new Cassavant was 44 ranks--so that fits the formula. But my present = parish church holds less than 300 (unless we stuff 'em in), and our little = Walcker is 23 ranks--maybe we're cheating. St. Bart's in NYC is over 300 ranks, I think, but I doubt that that place holds 10,000 worshipers. But Radio = City Music Hall holds ?4,000, but surely doesn't have 120 ranks or anywhere = NEAR it! How about Soldiers' Field, Chicago?   Surely there must be other factors: acoustics, "purpose" of room (church, university recital hall, home music room. And voicing certainly comes in here somewhere. I think that this whole theory may crash.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Re: Chimes From: <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 17:14:49 -0400   > Has anyone on the list run across a really decent set of > bell/chime/carillon samples for MIDI? They appear to have everything > else including some really obscure historical and ethnic instruments, > but bell samples seem to be rare.   Roland synths (at least the XP series) have very good tubular chime and = cast bell samples. There are also good samples for Akai samplers and for = GigaSampler.