PipeChat Digest #3931 - Wednesday, September 3, 2003
 
carillons
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
One ringy-dingy
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: One ringy-dingy
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: One ringy-dingy
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
my scribblings (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com>
Re: Daniel
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: A new question about chimes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Hanging Chimes
  by "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net>
Re: Daniel
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Hymnal Debate in USA Today
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
Re: carillons
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: Chimes
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
Re: One ringy-dingy
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: French organs
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: carillons From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 08:53:16 -0700   As I recall, the young woman who demonstrated the carillon at University of California, Riverside for me was wearing a sports bra, bike shorts, trainers, and something that looked for all the world like BOXING GLOVES.   She played a delightful arrangement of "The Teddy Bears' Picnic" ... by the end, she was sweating prodigiously, even though the bell-cabin was air-conditioned (!).   I remember the dedication of the carillon at Church of the Covenant in Cleveland (Todd Wilson's church), wherein the Dutch recitalist pulled some truly AMAZING crescendos and decrescendos out of the instrument DURING tremolando passages (the hardest technique to manage on a mechanical-action baton-console).   It was at that recital that I learned a carillon CAN be a beautiful AND expressive instrument, AND that it has its own literature, AND that it MUST have mechanical action, since, unlike an electric-action organ with multiple sounds, the only way to vary the single sound IS by touch.   Cheers,   Bud   Colin Mitchell wrote: > Hello, > > Better still, get a whole tower full from the John > Taylor bell-founding company here in the UK!! > > They supply carillons all over the world, and many > organists actually play them, amongst them Bas de > Vroome in the Netherlands, where the two jobs have > often been linked. > > OF COURSE, the purists would demand tracker action > rather than electricfication, but I expect someone in > the UK could design a good barker-lever version for > the Francophiles or a full-blown pneumatic system for > towers containing early 20th century bells. > > Of course, one could never QUITE enjoy that control > and intimacy of touch available with the historic > pegs, squares, pedals,levers, pulleys and wires. > > You don't believe me? > > Try <www.taylorbells.co.uk> > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > (Anyone who has ever tried an old carillon as I have, > will know how funny that last paragraph is! It pays > to be an Olympic Athlete on steroids, amphetomines and > pain killers all at the same time. A tracker organ is > but a mere stepping stone!) > > > --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > >>Your organbuilder/curator can most likely provide a >>set of actions made >>specifically for the chimes > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software > http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: One ringy-dingy From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 08:56:47 -0700       Shelley Culver wrote: He has access to some organ chimes, > and wants to know the best way to convert them to freestanding > orchestral chimes, without harming the sound of the organ chimes in any > way. > > Orchestral chimes are very expensive. So if he can't find a set to > rent/borrow/get at a reasonable price, he wants to know if he can indeed > turn his organ chimes into orchestral chimes (refer to above pictures > for exact defintion). >   Build a frame; suspend the chime tubes with sturdy LEATHER THONGS (minds out of the gutter, people) (grin) ... they won't damp the sound or carry the vibrations to the frame ... and far enough apart that they won't bump each other if somebody "dings" a bit too enthusiastically.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: One ringy-dingy From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 12:10:41 -0400   Thank you, Bud!   Does it matter where the holes are for the leather thongs to be put in?   Shelley -- still being the official spokeswoman for Eric and still not doing her counterpoint homework     >>> quilisma@cox.net 09/03/03 11:56 AM >>>     Shelley Culver wrote: He has access to some organ chimes, > and wants to know the best way to convert them to freestanding > orchestral chimes, without harming the sound of the organ chimes in any > way. > > Orchestral chimes are very expensive. So if he can't find a set to > rent/borrow/get at a reasonable price, he wants to know if he can indeed > turn his organ chimes into orchestral chimes (refer to above pictures > for exact defintion). >   Build a frame; suspend the chime tubes with sturdy LEATHER THONGS (minds   out of the gutter, people) (grin) ... they won't damp the sound or carry   the vibrations to the frame ... and far enough apart that they won't bump each other if somebody "dings" a bit too enthusiastically.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: One ringy-dingy From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 09:39:12 -0700   They need to be near the top on BOTH sides, so the chimes will hang straight.   Cheers,   Bud   Shelley Culver wrote: > Thank you, Bud! > > Does it matter where the holes are for the leather thongs to be put in? > > Shelley -- still being the official spokeswoman for Eric and still not > doing her counterpoint homework > > > >>>>quilisma@cox.net 09/03/03 11:56 AM >>> >>> > > > Shelley Culver wrote: > He has access to some organ chimes, > >>and wants to know the best way to convert them to freestanding >>orchestral chimes, without harming the sound of the organ chimes in > > any > >>way. >> >>Orchestral chimes are very expensive. So if he can't find a set to >>rent/borrow/get at a reasonable price, he wants to know if he can > > indeed > >>turn his organ chimes into orchestral chimes (refer to above pictures >>for exact defintion). >> > > > Build a frame; suspend the chime tubes with sturdy LEATHER THONGS (minds > > out of the gutter, people) (grin) ... they won't damp the sound or carry > > the vibrations to the frame ... and far enough apart that they won't > bump each other if somebody "dings" a bit too enthusiastically. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: my scribblings (X-posted) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 09:51:50 -0700   Dear Friends,       Since leaving St. Matthew's, I'm no longer restricted to what I have to write / arrange for them (grin). Some of you who aren't on my download list might be interested in some of the following:       Praeparate corda vestra - Gallus (Latin text) - SAB the same with English text - SAB   Alma Redemptoris Mater - Palestrina - SATB - English paraphrase (toned down a bit from the Latin original)(grin) by Yr. Humble Servant   In Nomine Jesu - Gallus - English - SAB   Christus factus est - Anerio - English - SAB   Improperium - Griesbacher - English - SAB - not at ALL like the Griesbacher propers ... polyphonic, quite lovely   Ego sum panis vivus - English - Michael Haller - SATB the same for SAB   The Spirit of the Lord - Elgar - arranged for UNISON chorus with SIMPLIFIED organ accompaniment       Alternatim Hymns:       Ave maris stella - English - chant/Vittoria - SAB   Veni, Redemptor gentium - English - chant/Palestrina - SAB   Crux fidelis - English - chant/Lassus - SAB - the full version for Good Friday, with the refrains   Vexilla regis - English - chant/Giuseppe Terrabugio (early 20th century?) - SAB - in the rather difficult key of E flat minor, but a tone UP and it runs the basses off the top; a tone DOWN and it runs the altos off the bottom. The dark sound IS nice (grin).   Veni Sancte Spiritus - English - chant/Palestrina - SATB - the last verse simplified for single chorus   Sacris solemniis - English - chant/Casciolini - SATB   Pange lingua - English - chant/Lassus - SAB   Pange lingua - English - chant/Palestrina - SATB - the familiar one   Pange lingua - English - chant/Vittoria - SATB - the Spanish chant melody   Verbum supernum prodiens (the Corpus Christi text) - English - chant/Palestrina - SATB - this is awfully BRIGHT in D Major, but like so many pieces of this era, the alto lies VERY low ... it COULD be sung in D Flat major, if the altos have the REALLY low notes (grin)       Gradual Psalms       I'm somewhere in Epiphanytide, Year C ... SATB, Gregorian/fauxbourdons by Viadana ... but I'm using the ECUSA lectionary, so I don't know if the texts would be something you could use. The refrains are congregational, taken from our "Gradual Psalms", the most commonly-used book in the US.     Alternatim Mags & Nuncs       Gregorian/various, SAB, SATB - Tones 1, 3, and 8 at the moment, I think; multiple ones in Tone 8, of course (grin)       Misc.       Good Friday Epitaphy Lamentations - Byzantine - SATB Good Friday Responsories for Tenebrae - simple modal SATB settings - in progress Good Friday Tenebrae for the LCMS - in progress Greek "Trampling" Easter Chant - in progress - a longer version - SATB Sunday Trisagion - Vittoria - nine-fold (Greek, Latin, English) - SATB       So ... if you'd like any of the above, just let me know.       Donations VERY cheerfully accepted (grin), but TOTALLY voluntary. I'd rather the music be SUNG. If you ARE in a position to donate, it's       RAYMOND H. CLARK (the bank has no IDEA who "Bud" is) (grin) 2616 University Ave. San Diego, CA 92104-2810       Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Jim Clouser" <CromorneCipher@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:02:06 -0400   I haven't been following this thread too closely, but most "organ chimes" that I've seen have been in fact tubular bells, and set up the same way as orchestral tubular bells are. If that's the case with Eric's organ, why = not just take a bell mallet to them?? :) Other than that, I'd say find a = good connection to a local school. At my new church, the area high school = loans us their percussive instruments for free as long as they are not being = used by the school's bands/orchestras. The reason why they are so lax about it is that one of our congregation members is on faculty at the school and she's good buddies with the director of music there. Even if you don't = have that kind of contact, I'm sure that any local school or even local = orchestra would be willing to loan you a set of bells for a small fee.   If that still doesn't work, try E-bay. :)   Jim Clouser Director of Music Ministries/Organist, Our Redeemer Lutheran Church - = Solon, Ohio BM candidate, Cleveland Institute of Music     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2003 11:47 AM Subject: Chimes     > Good morning Pipchat buddies! > > In regards to Eric's chime question, I think you're all thinking on the > wrong track. Stop thinking organ chimes and think of going to a band or > symphony concert and think the chimes you would see in the percussion > section. (See pictures here: http://www.rossmallets.com/chimes.html or > http://www.musicanfriend.com/prod_disp.asp?itemnum=3DR605 or > http://www.caldwellmusic.com/prod_disp.asp?itemnum=3DBK5003) Eric has > chimes or a carillon or something like it on his organ. He wants > something more authentic, for one thing. For another thing, the organist > (who will not be Eric) cannot play both the chime part and the organ > part. > > Now, I know this is an organ list and so the first thing that pops in to > many people's heads is organ chimes. However, as he once specified, he > wants chimes that are more of a percussion instrument that you strike > with a mallet. > > Now, if we want to turn this into an organ-related topic, read the > following statement very closely: He has access to some organ chimes, > and wants to know the best way to convert them to freestanding > orchestral chimes, without harming the sound of the organ chimes in any > way. > > Orchestral chimes are very expensive. So if he can't find a set to > rent/borrow/get at a reasonable price, he wants to know if he can indeed > turn his organ chimes into orchestral chimes (refer to above pictures > for exact defintion). > > So having said this, does anyone have any suggestions on how to do this? > > Thanks bunches-- > Shelley -- the official spokeswoman for Eric McKirdy when he's too busy > to send his own emails. And now...back to species counterpoint homework. > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.515 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 9/1/2003  
(back) Subject: Re: Daniel From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:18:52 -0400   On 9/3/03 11:01 AM, "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> wrote:   > oopps sorry that was a private message   Well, it sure was an opener for a conversation!   No. Please send right away to   Alan F...... .....    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:19:07 EDT   I've been following this thread, and I wonder, isn't it true that orchestral chimes have some sort of damper to stop the ring when appropriate. Wouldn't this need to be built in if using regular organ chimes hit with a hammer no matter how they are mounted? Any chime would ring over long if not dampered in some way. I've never seen a set of orchestral chimes upclose, but I would bet some sort of damper arrangement, perhaps a foot pedal activator is involved.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:24:23 -0400   "Other than that, I'd say find a good connection to a local school..."   This option has pretty much been exhausted. Eric's best friend is a band director, but the district doesn't have a set or doesn't have a usable set or something.   I can't speak exactly about Eric's organ, but he said it was a carillon, and I think it's probably a digital stop (?). But I could be totally wrong on that one.   Shelley      
(back) Subject: Re: A new question about chimes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:24:31 -0400   On 9/3/03 11:29 AM, "harv8" <harv8@email.msn.com> wrote:   > They can be hung from a frame that can be constructed out of wood as = they have > a string loop at the top and the mountin will not affect the tonality at = all. > The location would have more of an effect.   Yes. Don't forget a secondary rack near the bottom (can't have them just swingin' around, y'know), and a "squelch" pedal or whatever it's called. All holes are felt-lined, of course.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Hanging Chimes From: "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:29:11 -0400   The chime tubes on the Moller I maintain are hung using leather thongs. = Actually, you could also use leather shoelaces as replacements for = these. (Available in most any shoe store of athletic supply house.)   If the tubes were to be mounted using a metal shaft through the tube, = then the shaft could be covered with Surgical Tubing. While flexible, = the surgical tubing has a hard enough surface not to dampen the ring. = Under no circumstances would you cover a metal support with common = plastic tubing. It is too soft and will shorten ring time.   JMT  
(back) Subject: Re: Daniel From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 14:26:58 -0300     > Well, it sure was an opener for a conversation! > > No. Please send right away to > > Alan F...... > ....     haha, yes :-)>    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:28:25 -0400   "I've been following this thread, and I wonder, isn't it true that orchestral chimes have some sort of damper to stop the ring when appropriate."   Yes this is true. I haven't exactly played any orchestral chimes, but I have seen them up close. There is some sort of pedal thingy that does something.   I would think one could damp the sound in some other way though. I don't know if its an exact necessity though. Don't you think you could just put your hand on the pipe or something? Sort of like damping a timpani (again, I've never actually done this, but I've seen it done.)   Shelley      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymnal Debate in USA Today From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:31:48 -0400   On 9/3/03 11:31 AM, "Pepehomer@aol.com" <Pepehomer@aol.com> wrote:   > Interesting article in USA Today debating both sides of the "hymnal vs = video > screen" debate. > > http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20030903/5464114s.htm > Thank you, Justin. Actually, a rather well balanced article. Those who passed it by--give it another thought.   Alan (not taking sides right here and now)    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:38:49 -0400   Usually the player simply touches the chiime with his other hand to = deaden it Wear cloth gloves to prevent tarnish!.   A wooden mallet or a hard plastic screwdriver handle works best to give = a good "dong". Strike them at the very top for best results. Never hit a = chime with a metal object.   If you can't find a set you can always make your own out of steel or = aluminium tubing sold in hardware stores for electrical conduit. You = just cut them to length and tune them by grinding them shorter. The = holes should be 1-3 inches from the top. (make the lowest note first - = you can them use your boo-boo's for higher notes.) A plug of some sort = in the top makes the sound more stable. Less of that clang sound and the = annoying yang-yang ring that you get without a plug.   Nelson     I've been following this thread, and I wonder, isn't it true that orchestral chimes have some sort of damper to stop the ring when appropriate. Wouldn't this need to be built in if using regular organ chimes hit with a hammer no matter how they are mounted? Any chime would ring over long if not dampered in some way. I've never seen a set of orchestral chimes upclose, but I would bet some sort of damper arrangement, perhaps a foot pedal activator is involved.   Ron Severin     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.512 / Virus Database: 309 - Release Date: 19-Aug-03  
(back) Subject: Re: carillons From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:45:57 -0400   We have a very nice carillon on campus. I got to play it last year after a wedding that occurred on campus. It was kind of fun, but I was scared I was going to make a mistake and the whole town would hear! We now have a practice carillon in the organ room. It's good to pound on, but not nearly as hard to play as the real deal...   The worst part about the carillon was running up the scary stairs wearing high heels!   Shelley   >>> quilisma@cox.net 09/03/03 11:53 AM >>> As I recall, the young woman who demonstrated the carillon at University   of California, Riverside for me was wearing a sports bra, bike shorts, trainers, and something that looked for all the world like BOXING GLOVES.   She played a delightful arrangement of "The Teddy Bears' Picnic" ... by the end, she was sweating prodigiously, even though the bell-cabin was air-conditioned (!).   I remember the dedication of the carillon at Church of the Covenant in Cleveland (Todd Wilson's church), wherein the Dutch recitalist pulled some truly AMAZING crescendos and decrescendos out of the instrument DURING tremolando passages (the hardest technique to manage on a mechanical-action baton-console).   It was at that recital that I learned a carillon CAN be a beautiful AND expressive instrument, AND that it has its own literature, AND that it MUST have mechanical action, since, unlike an electric-action organ with   multiple sounds, the only way to vary the single sound IS by touch.   Cheers,   Bud   Colin Mitchell wrote: > Hello, > > Better still, get a whole tower full from the John > Taylor bell-founding company here in the UK!! > > They supply carillons all over the world, and many > organists actually play them, amongst them Bas de > Vroome in the Netherlands, where the two jobs have > often been linked. > > OF COURSE, the purists would demand tracker action > rather than electricfication, but I expect someone in > the UK could design a good barker-lever version for > the Francophiles or a full-blown pneumatic system for > towers containing early 20th century bells. > > Of course, one could never QUITE enjoy that control > and intimacy of touch available with the historic > pegs, squares, pedals,levers, pulleys and wires. > > You don't believe me? > > Try <www.taylorbells.co.uk> > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > (Anyone who has ever tried an old carillon as I have, > will know how funny that last paragraph is! It pays > to be an Olympic Athlete on steroids, amphetomines and > pain killers all at the same time. A tracker organ is > but a mere stepping stone!) > > > --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > >>Your organbuilder/curator can most likely provide a >>set of actions made >>specifically for the chimes > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software > http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:46:16 EDT   Hi Shelly:   If you play any combination of notes or scales you would need a dampering mechanism for clarity otherwise it would be a free for all mish mash with notes hanging on until they die out. I don't think it would make for very musical results. That's my thought, otherwise there's no control for the player.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 12:50:00 -0500   Orchestral Chimes (tubular) do have a dampening mechanism controlled by = a pedal. =20   Sand    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 12:59:11 -0500   It can (and has) been done. I would use heavy cloth cord -- like venetian-blind cord, or mono-filament fishing wire. Just be sure the chime hangs freely, not touching anything else. On Wednesday, September 3, 2003, at 10:48 AM, PipeChat wrote:   > If I somehow acquired a set of organ chimes, but the electronics > weren't > working, and the chimes themselves were fine, and I wanted to build a > frame > to mount the organ chimes myself, could that be done, in theory? > Specifically, what method would I use to hang the chimes from the 2x4 > (or > whatever) in such a way that no resonance, pitch or timbre would be > lost? Or > is this totally out of the question? > Larry Wheelock Director of Music Ministries Kenwood United Methodist Church Milwaukee, Wisconsin musicdirector@kenwood_umc.org    
(back) Subject: Re: One ringy-dingy From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:02:49 -0500   At 12:10 PM 9/3/2003 -0400, Shelley wrote:   >Does it matter where the holes are for the leather thongs to be put in?   Organ chime tubes will already have holes for hanging straps at their tops =   (the closed end of the tube, usually). For heaven's sake, don't go trying =   to drill new ones, or you'll likely hurt the tune/tone of the tubes!   Also remember that they want to be struck (whether with an electric action =   OR a mallet) at or very near the top of each tube. If you hit them in the =   middle, they don't sound good at all, for the most part.   Tim      
(back) Subject: Re: French organs From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:04:33 +0100 (BST)   Hi all I am currently on holiday in Nafplion in Southern Greece - heaven, but outrageous prices for internet connections, so there will be more when I get back home in a couple of days. There are some superb organs scattered all over France - not necessarily in Cathedrals - though some of these are not bad - they are usually in the West Gallery and have a commanding presence. I went on an organ crawl with Maurice Forsyth Grant in 1973 when I was organist at Notre Dame de France, Leicester Square and we played a lot of instruments. I have a record somewhere (diary type) which I will consult asap. But don't dismiss provincial France! John Foss   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/