PipeChat Digest #3934 - Wednesday, September 3, 2003
 
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: One ringy-dingy
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: carillons
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Surgical tubing
  by "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net>
Re: Leather deterioration in NYC
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: carillons
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Chimes
  by "Mickey Sadler" <mickeysadler@wowway.com>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: Surgical tubing
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: historic approach
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Poor thing
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: carillons
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Surgical tubing
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: Andrew Carnegie/organ
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: One ringy-dingy
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net>
Re: Surgical tubing
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: Surgical tubing
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Chime Hangers
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: A new question about chimes
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
RE: A new question about chimes
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: carillons
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 14:56:11 -0700   On 9/3/03 2:14 PM, Alan Freed said something about:   > And it's easy, as long as you're building the darn thing, to put in a = damper > pedal   Show me the plans, and I'll do it!        
(back) Subject: Re: One ringy-dingy From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 16:19:00 -0700   On Wednesday, September 3, 2003, at 03:31 PM, Tim Bovard wrote:   > I'd agree with Bud that this probably wouldn't be satisfactory, as the > chime tube would be too "restrained".   Okay. I can accept that. The reason I ask, is because of this photo, which doesn't appear to have chimes hanging loosely. Does anyone know how the pipes are fastened to the top?   http://www.1800usaband.com/htmls/picturedetail.asp?PictureID=3D675   Eric -- really, I'm almost done railroading the good graces of all of you      
(back) Subject: Re: carillons From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 18:34:39 -0500   We have something just slightly smaller than a carillon at the UI. Does anyone know what a "diminished carillon" is called? Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:45:57 -0400 Subject: Re: carillons   > We have a very nice carillon on campus. I got to play it last year > after > a wedding that occurred on campus. It was kind of fun, but I was scared > I was going to make a mistake and the whole town would hear! We now > have > a practice carillon in the organ room. It's good to pound on, but not > nearly as hard to play as the real deal... > > The worst part about the carillon was running up the scary stairs > wearing high heels! > > Shelley      
(back) Subject: Surgical tubing From: "Jason M. Taylor" <Jason.M.Taylor@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:40:26 -0400   Eric,   Surgical tubing is available in medical supply shops. Its normal use is = something I have no knowledge of.   The box I have is as follows: Natural Rubber Latex Tubing; product = number 88-3933 38; size is 3/16 x 3/8 x 3/32. Made by Graham - Field, = Inc. 400 Rabro Drive, Hauppauge, NY, 11788. It is usually available = at around $1.65 per foot.   For our use, it is covering screws that hold the notes for a = Glockenspiel, a Xylophone, and a metal bar harp - all in a theatre pipe = organ. The product greatly increases the ring time over plastic = coverings.   JMT  
(back) Subject: Re: Leather deterioration in NYC From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 18:54:11 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: <ameagher@stny.rr.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 01, 2003 11:42 PM Subject: Re: Leather deterioration in NYC     > How long the leather lasts also depends on the air in the hall.   A couple of points to add to this.   First, do not assume that country air is less polluted than city air and that leather will therefore last longer in rural areas. Modern = fertilizers release acids into the air and agriculture is often as responsible as = heavy industry for the acids that shorten the life of leather. Downtown city areas are often these days subject to strict anti-pollution rules, and the air in downtown St. Louis, for example, is less polluted than a number of its affluent (and supposedly desirable) suburbs.   Second, new unfinished plywood is DEADLY to leather, giving off formaldehyde. It even eats into pipework. I recently came across a reservoir that had gone out in next to no time through the plenum being plywood and unfinished inside. And lining the organ chamber or building inside of the casework with new unpainted plywood is also deadly.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: carillons From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:00:34 -0500   Is this a supposed to be a joke? If so, is a possible answer "Poco Bell"?   Bob Lind ----- Original Message ----- From: Alicia Zeilenga <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2003 6:34 PM Subject: Re: carillons     > We have something just slightly smaller than a carillon at the UI. Does =   > anyone know what a "diminished carillon" is called? > Alicia Zeilenga      
(back) Subject: Chimes From: "Mickey Sadler" <mickeysadler@wowway.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 20:03:20 -0700   Hi All,   Here are some interesting sites about chimes. They talk about wind chimes, but the principles and calculations should be the same for other chimes.   http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm   http://www1.iwvisp.com/cllsj/windchimes/   http://www1.iwvisp.com/cllsj/windchimes/length.htm   http://www1.iwvisp.com/cllsj/windchimes/conduit.htm   http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/wchime/wchime.html   Later,   Mickey ---- Mickey E. Sadler Dublin, Ohio    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 16:42:33 -0700   On 9/3/03 3:38 PM, Alan Freed said something about:   > Eric: Stop now! This is a bigger job than you think (based on your = post). >."Don't even START" until you know a heck damn hell smash of a lot more = about > what you're DOING!" You'll just end up disGUSTed! And nobody needs = that.   With all due respect, Alan, if I'd listened to that same advice every time it's been given to me, I wouldn't have come nearly as far in life as I = have. What can it hurt, to try? How do you expect me to figure anything out? :-)        
(back) Subject: Re: Surgical tubing From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 17:02:07 -0700   Thanks, Jason. I appreciate this.   Quite a few people seem to believe hanging the chimes with leather laces = or some such method is preferable, so I am starting to think in that = direction. I have to remember how heavy these things are -- as long as they're hit directly, and at the top, they shouldn't travel much -- into other chimes, etc. And I'll stick a thin piece of felted trim between the "white notes" and the black notes" so they can't make contact that way, either.   I can't wait! Just for the record, I have obtained a 1.5 octave set of Maas-Rowe Cathedral Chimes. The (former) owner says the chimes themselves are in "rough-looking condition," but that it isn't obvious from far away, and they have a "great tone, exactly the same as orchestral chimes."   Eric -- color me giddy!     On 9/3/03 4:40 PM, Jason M. Taylor said something about:   > Eric, > > Surgical tubing is available in medical supply shops. Its normal use is > something I have no knowledge of. > > The box I have is as follows: Natural Rubber Latex Tubing; product = number > 88-3933 38; size is 3/16 x 3/8 x 3/32. Made by Graham - Field, Inc. = 400 > Rabro Drive, Hauppauge, NY, 11788. It is usually available at around = $1.65 > per foot. > > For our use, it is covering screws that hold the notes for a = Glockenspiel, a > Xylophone, and a metal bar harp - all in a theatre pipe organ. The = product > greatly increases the ring time over plastic coverings. > > JMT    
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:13:52 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: <ameagher@stny.rr.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 01, 2003 11:55 PM Subject: Re: historic approach     Bud,   Those american organist play the Widor toccat TOO fast. It isn't really supposed to go that fast. The reason is the articulation is supposed to = be staccato and it is impossible to do this if you play it too fast. Those who play it too fast usually cheat on the articulation and play legato..   Not just Americans. Marcel Dupre used to play it like a bat out of hell too. As to whether it works at that speed or not depends a lot on the action of the organ. Most instruments have pretty sluggish actions, and = as you say the notes become a blurr so that it is easy to cheat on articulation. On a fast instrument, especially one with double-stage primaries, however, all the notes will come clearly and it will be = difficult to cheat. Marcel Dupre seems to have been able to maintain the = articulation even at breakneck speed.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Poor thing From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 20:17:47 -0400   Hello Pipechatters,   Another day another tuning. Posaune Low E #5 wasn't speaking this morn... Giant moth wedged in echalote... What a way to go... I've heard stories about bats and pigeons, can anyone top those? (C:   = -Nate   "The Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: carillons From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 17:27:51 -0700   A "chime", if it's under two octaves.   Cheers,   Bud   Alicia Zeilenga wrote: > We have something just slightly smaller than a carillon at the UI. Does =   > anyone know what a "diminished carillon" is called? > Alicia Zeilenga > Sub-Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > -----Original Message----- > From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 13:45:57 -0400 > Subject: Re: carillons > > >>We have a very nice carillon on campus. I got to play it last year >>after >>a wedding that occurred on campus. It was kind of fun, but I was scared >>I was going to make a mistake and the whole town would hear! We now >>have >>a practice carillon in the organ room. It's good to pound on, but not >>nearly as hard to play as the real deal... >> >>The worst part about the carillon was running up the scary stairs >>wearing high heels! >> >>Shelley > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:38:35 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 5:36 PM Subject: RE: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ     > For as long as I have been around, the age-old guide for sizing a pipe organ was 3 or 4 complete ranks of pipes (counting mixtures as 1 rank) per 100 seats in a hall.   In that case our 9 rank Aeolian-Skinner is exactly the right size for our building. We were thinking of expanding it to 14 ranks.   John Speller, St. Mark's Episcopal Church, St. Louis, Mo.    
(back) Subject: Re: Surgical tubing From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 20:46:58 -0400       Eric McKirdy wrote:   > Thanks, Jason. I appreciate this. > > Quite a few people seem to believe hanging the chimes with leather laces = or > some such method is preferable, so I am starting to think in that = direction. > I have to remember how heavy these things are -- as long as they're hit > directly, and at the top, they shouldn't travel much -- into other = chimes, > etc. And I'll stick a thin piece of felted trim between the "white = notes" > and the black notes" so they can't make contact that way, either. > > I can't wait! Just for the record, I have obtained a 1.5 octave set of > Maas-Rowe Cathedral Chimes. The (former) owner says the chimes = themselves > are in "rough-looking condition," but that it isn't obvious from far = away, > and they have a "great tone, exactly the same as orchestral chimes." > > Eric -- color me giddy! >   Hi Eric, I just got home from work and discovered this astonishing thread. Who = would of thought it would develop like this from the simple question you asked us = on IRC chat Monday night. I saw and handled an organ chime for the first time earlier this year. = It was made of brass tube with a cap soldered over the top opening. This cap had = an eyelet built into it for suspending the chime. The chime I saw was about 5 = ft long, and not really heavy at all. I would think it could easily be = suspended vertically from an appropriately sized screwed in hook from the top piece = of your frame. If the hole in the chime cap is big enough, you might insulate the = hook with surgical tube as Josh suggested, but I experiment first to find out = if this was truly necessary. To answer your question about how the chimes are suspended in the = picture you directed us to, I imagine there is a pin soldered to the top of the chime horizontally that slides into a hole in the upper frame, yet keeps the = chime standing "proud" of the frame so it can ring without being dampened. I = would further suggest that this pin is threaded so that nuts can be screwed on = both sides of the frame thereby tightening the chime enough to keep it from = moving very much in any direction. I'm not at all sure this is the case, but it is the mechanical impression I get from looking at the picture. Your "brass bolt" = idea might not be as faulty as some folks have cautioned provided your chimes = have the eyelet cap I described, and provided the chime stands proud of the frame = when you mount it. Sounds like you are well on your way with your "Chimes for Christmas" = project, and with a little experimentation, I'm sure you will discover the best way = to mount them. Please do keep us informed on your project. I'm sure the whole "Pipechat Family" will be pleased to hear from you. Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: Andrew Carnegie/organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 19:47:51 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> To: "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2003 9:40 AM Subject: Andrew Carnegie/organ     > As a side note, I might add that Marie Claire Alain played Messaien's = "La > Banquet Celeste" on the baroque Taylor & Boody 4M. tracker at Holy Cross > College Chapel some time ago, it decidedly did not go!   I remember when I lived in Bethlehem, Pa., Marie-Claire Alain gave a = recital for the Bethlehem Bach Festival on the organ at 1st. Presbyterian Church = in Bethlehem. This is a large Moller organ which while not bad in its way, = is just not an organ for playing Bach. But when the Bethlehem Bach Choir = hired her and told her it had to be an all-Bach program, what was the poor woman to do? So she made the best of a bad job and played a far from stellar = Bach recital. Her chance came with the encore, when she played the well known Daquin Noel, which came off on the instrument fabulously well. Her way of saying what we might have experienced if she had been able to play = anything other than Bach ...   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: One ringy-dingy From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 17:58:11 -0700   Hello Eric,   Suggested reading on the subject of chimes.   A: The Physics of Musical Instruments, Nevil H. Fletcher & Thomas D. Rossing ISBN 0-387-94151-7 Springer-Verlag New York Berlin Heidelberg (pbk.) ISBN 0-540-94151-7 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York   B: Music, Physics and Engineering, Harry F. Olson (Second Edition) ISBN 0-486_21769-8 Dover Publications, Inc. New York   Bells and Resonators are discussed in both books with formulas for their construction.   Tunings are also discussed as well as harmonic structures with and without end loading.   This is similar to stretch tuning in pianos to brung harmonics into tune with each other.   A more down to earth approach may be found in:   C: Musical Instrument Design, Bart Hopkin ISBN 1-884365-08-6 (pbk.) Sharp press, P. O. Box 1731, Tucson, AZ 85702-1731   He offers a hands on approach to making musical instruments.   Usually chimes are suspended at one end a small percentage of the total length from the end. With chimes this makes the resonator behave like a bar clamped at one end. They may be plugged and loaded in an effort to control the strongest harmonics to bring them closer to being in tune with each other.   Have fun reading and building.   Vern Jones, Sound Research   Http://www.Sound-Research.net   Eric McKirdy wrote: > > On Wednesday, September 3, 2003, at 03:31 PM, Tim Bovard wrote: > > > I'd agree with Bud that this probably wouldn't be satisfactory, as the > > chime tube would be too "restrained". > > Okay. I can accept that. The reason I ask, is because of this photo, > which doesn't appear to have chimes hanging loosely. Does anyone know > how the pipes are fastened to the top? > > http://www.1800usaband.com/htmls/picturedetail.asp?PictureID=3D675 > > Eric -- really, I'm almost done railroading the good graces of all of > you > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Vern Jones" <soundres@foothill.net> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 18:10:26 -0700   Hello Eric,   Suggested reading on the subject of chimes.   A: The Physics of Musical Instruments, Nevil H. Fletcher & Thomas D. Rossing ISBN 0-387-94151-7 Springer-Verlag New York Berlin Heidelberg (pbk.) ISBN 0-540-94151-7 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York   B: Music, Physics and Engineering, Harry F. Olson (Second Edition) ISBN 0-486_21769-8 Dover Publications, Inc. New York   Bells and Resonators are discussed in both books with formulas for their construction.   Tunings are also discussed as well as harmonic structures with and without end loading.   This is similar to stretch tuning in pianos to brung harmonics into tune with each other.   A more down to earth approach may be found in:   C: Musical Instrument Design, Bart Hopkin ISBN 1-884365-08-6 (pbk.) Sharp press, P. O. Box 1731, Tucson, AZ 85702-1731   He offers a hands on approach to making musical instruments.   Usually chimes are suspended at one end a small percentage of the total length from the end. With chimes this makes the resonator behave like a bar clamped at one end. They may be plugged and loaded in an effort to control the strongest harmonics to bring them closer to being in tune with each other.   Have fun reading and building.   Vern Jones, Sound Research   Http://www.Sound-Research.net     Eric McKirdy wrote: > > On 9/3/03 3:38 PM, Alan Freed said something about: > > > Eric: Stop now! This is a bigger job than you think (based on your = post). > >."Don't even START" until you know a heck damn hell smash of a lot more = about > > what you're DOING!" You'll just end up disGUSTed! And nobody needs = that. > > With all due respect, Alan, if I'd listened to that same advice every = time > it's been given to me, I wouldn't have come nearly as far in life as I = have. > What can it hurt, to try? How do you expect me to figure anything out? = :-) > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Surgical tubing From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 17:50:50 -0700   Thanks, Mike, for adding your expertise and insight. I do plan a lot of experimentation before a single board is screwed into another. Then, just like my grandfather has always told me, I'll draw up plans for the construction before I get to work. One of my hobbies -- although by no = means a strength -- is minor carpentry, and I think I can handle this, and I = will surely invoke the aid of my grandfather, a farmer who knows every trick to every trade.      
(back) Subject: Re: Surgical tubing From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 17:54:48 -0700   On 9/3/03 5:46 PM, Mike Gettelman said something about:   > I saw and handled an organ chime for the first time earlier this year. = It > was made of brass tube with a cap soldered over the top opening. This = cap had > an eyelet built into it for suspending the chime.   I certainly hope that's how mine turn out to be. That would make things awfully easy.      
(back) Subject: Chime Hangers From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 21:14:31 -0500   OSI sells chime hangers in their catalog. They look identical to a bunch I have that were removed from a Wicks chime installation--basically a heavy coated wire to thread through the chime. A metal clip holds it on the frame.   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: Re: A new question about chimes From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 21:46:54 -0500   Hello, Eric, et al: The question seems simple enough. However, you will need to "arrange" the chimes in something resembling the naturals and sharps. Most of the hung orchestral chimes are suspened in a way that the key-name is intuitively obvious. The orchestral chimes are suspended at the end of a loop of "string" made of <???> what, I do not know. The loop is attached to the rack and is spread wider than the chime, so the "string" touches the chime only at the point where the "string" passes through the holes in the chimes; not against the sides of the chime tubes, which will damp the sound somewhat. This method of suspension allows the chime tube to speak in direct proportion to how it is struck with the mallet. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 22:19:01 -0500   Hello, John, Paul, et al:   The observation that an organ suitable for an Episcopal service might need to be determined apart from the size of the building or the number of seats for parishioners.   That is appropriate, and falls nicely into the mindset of most organ builders who prefer to build an organ that is suitable for the worship style of the congregation and the acoustics of the room.   As with all "rules of thumb," the age-old guide for sizing a pipe organ that was passed along to me was only a "rule of thumb."   Let me add that, in my opinion, an organ that supports hymn singing and some accompanimental work with choir or soloist may not need to have everything that many of us would appreciate when trying to render the organ literature of the past 300 years.   I was working with a fellow to provide an organ to a cloister of nuns. He insisted that they would probably only need a couple of flute ranks. When I inquired of their music style needs, he replied that they only use the organ for the very simplest of styles and it was usually meditative in nature.   So, large or small, the style has a powerful influence on what we build, including the availability of cash with which to work.   F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs     .. ----- Original Message ----- From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2003 19:38 Subject: Re: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ     > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 5:36 PM > Subject: RE: And French romantic on the German Baroque organ > > > > For as long as I have been around, the age-old guide > for sizing a pipe organ was 3 or 4 complete ranks of > pipes (counting mixtures as 1 rank) per 100 seats in > a hall. > > In that case our 9 rank Aeolian-Skinner is exactly the right size for our > building. We were thinking of expanding it to 14 ranks. > > John Speller, > St. Mark's Episcopal Church, > St. Louis, Mo. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: A new question about chimes From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 20:52:10 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Well of course I wasn't being too serious, but it is amazing how the same arguments rage in the carillon fraternity about action types and musical control.   I can't recall which village in Holland I disturbed with my ham-fisted gropings and hammerings, but it was a rickety old thing with very heavy action.   Bandaids? I needed a couple of arm slings!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: They silenced our local carillon because the council workers complained of the noise. That's England to-day.   "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> wrote:   > Just to be sure that you aren't serious, as one who > greatly enjoyed a life of chime for many years > (although it's been awhile since), > I must point out that an authentic mechanical > clavier is far more important for a carillon than > for an organ   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: carillons From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2003 20:59:52 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Hee hee!   I suppose if I were to try running up scary stairs wearing high-heels, that really WOULD be campanology!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Shelley Culver <culverse@westminster.edu> wrote:   > The worst part about the carillon was running up the > scary stairs > wearing high heels! >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com