PipeChat Digest #3935 - Thursday, September 4, 2003
 
Re: A new question about chimes
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: "UI" smaller than carillon
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: historic approach
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: A new question about chimes
  by "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Chimes (tubular bells)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Surgical tubing
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
History
  by "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com>
Re: History
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: A new question about chimes From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2003 19:51:25 -0700   On 9/3/03 7:46 PM, F Richard Burt said something about:   > The orchestral chimes are suspended at the end of a > loop of "string" made of <???> what, I do not know.   That right there seems to be the million-dollar question.   Richard, that's a good point, about the sides of whatever material not touching the sides of the chime. I've added that to my list of Things To Remember.   Thanks!    
(back) Subject: Re: "UI" smaller than carillon From: <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2003 00:46:55 EDT   University of Illinois ( if that is the "UI" of the question) has a famous =   "chime" of 12 or 14 bells in a campus tower. There has been talk over the = years of expanding this into a full carillon but $$ have never been available. There is also a small carillon on the campus, located in the Lutheran = Center; 24 bells if memory serves, which is located in a triangular tower and is a = "cozy fit" for anyone more than 100 lbs in weight :)    
(back) Subject: Re: historic approach From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2003 01:33:32 EDT   In a message dated 9/3/2003 7:13:44 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: Marcel Dupre seems to have been able to maintain the articulation even at breakneck speed. That's not all he was able to maintain. He also maintained a marriage to = his aunt.   Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com    
(back) Subject: Re: A new question about chimes From: "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2003 01:37:31 -0400   The cord can be just about anything wire, string, leather, shoelace etc. ( = I know of a few organs with all of the above holding up the chimes) All that is needed is that the loop in the string be made in such a way that the U in the cord does not rub on the sides of the chimes. Usually this simply means suspending the chime on a cord from two horizontal pins instead of one - example :----- Like that. ( don't you wish you could send pictures in text e-mail) staggered up and down as on a keyboard for easy reference to which note is which. Make sure the holes in the chimes do not have any sharp edges or the cord will fray in time and the chime and you will make = a rather nasty noise when it falls on your toe.You will wish to leave a reasonable gap between each chime so that you can swing your mallet = without hitting the wrong notes. About 4' wide for a 25 note set should be plenty of width. You will want to keep the cord short to slow down the swing of = the chimes but not so short that they bang into the framework when struck.   The stand can be made something similar to those rolling wooden or metal coat racks you see in churches. The idea is to make it sturdy enough that it doesn't sway as you play or tip over if you bump into it! Plus of = course you want it simple enough to make it portable and easily dis-assembled for storage. I've made several out of 3/4" plywood which simply interlocks together with mortise and tenon joints and 4 carriage bolts and wing = nuts. By using plywood you can make the mortises and tenons by simply laminating the pieces. For the pins that hold the chimes up you can simply use some long nails or if you want to get fancy you can try long carriage bolts through the frame with adjustable nuts and washers to make the whole thing look like you paid big $$$$$ for it.   ..   A damper mechanism could be as simple as hinged horizontal bar that = clamps the chimes to a fixed bar that forms the frame of the rack. For the = damper material you can use nice red, white and blue felt or simply some of that black foam neoprene rubber that is sold for door and window insulation.   A rope tied to a foot pedal and a screen door spring to pull the damper = back to the resting position with a latch to lock it closed so you can move = the chimes offstage without them clanging together would be a finishing touch.   The entire thing can be as crude or as elaborate as you like. Rosewood and ivory inlays anyone?   I'd suggest making a simple mock up to start and then make your final = setup once you know just what you want.   As to the question of the metals used - just about anything goes. Brass = and solid aluminium are the most common for professionally made chimes but = they are expensive metals! The metal alone costs about 1/2 of the price of a = set of good chimes. But you can make them out of just about anything. Try different things until you find a sound that you like.. Some silver or = gold paint will make even old water pipes look good +(:-P)). Just don't use anything that is cracked - it sounds awful!   As to mallets, try different things. As I said metal mallets make a = nasty noise but wood, hard felt, leather, hard plastic or hard rubber will give you different sounds. Try to experiment: A dollar store meat tenderizer mallet works wonders!   Nelson     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.512 / Virus Database: 309 - Release Date: 19-Aug-03    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 04 Sep 2003 02:43:32 -0400   On 9/3/03 5:56 PM, "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> wrote:   > Show me the plans, and I'll do it!   Yer a good man, Eric. I hope I'm right in saying that 'twas not I who = said it would be easy to do. Some people's "easy" is my "impossible."   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Chimes (tubular bells) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 04 Sep 2003 02:53:27 -0400   On 9/3/03 7:42 PM, "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> wrote:   > With all due respect, Alan, if I'd listened to that same advice every = time > it's been given to me, I wouldn't have come nearly as far in life as I = have. > What can it hurt, to try? How do you expect me to figure anything out? = :-)   Hey, I'm sorry Eric. I'm probably frustrated by my own incompetence, and quite awed by your ability and your willingness to take on the job. = Really. I wish you huge success.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Surgical tubing From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 04 Sep 2003 03:03:18 -0400   On 9/3/03 8:46 PM, "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> wrote:   > I'm sure the whole "Pipechat Family" will be pleased to hear from you.   I'm sure of that, too, in spite of my extremely sour notes of a few hours ago.   Alan    
(back) Subject: History From: "Paul" <pianoman1@ntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2003 09:02:14 +0100   Hi folks,   My Dad has been asked to write a short article on the history of church = music. Can any of you suggest any good web sites that would hold such = information for research??   Thanks   Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: History From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2003 04:03:59 EDT   what about church music? there is a WEALTH of knowledge on this site.     Gregory Ceurvorst M.M. Organ Performance Northwestern University Director of Music and Organist St. Peter's U.C.C. Frankfort, IL 847.332.2788 home 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com