PipeChat Digest #3940 - Saturday, September 6, 2003
 
With the compliments of Adolf Hitler
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re:Schnitger
  by "dballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: Poor thing
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Weekly Tunings
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
RE: History..Spanish Organs
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Talented organ builders
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Organists as tuners
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "C. Joseph Nichols" <cjn@nicholsandsimpson.com>
Re: Schnitger
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Wandering reeds and large organs
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
weekly tuning VISITS
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: weekly tuning VISITS
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Zoltan Kodaly
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Zoltan Kodaly
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: With the compliments of Adolf Hitler From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 12:31:57 +0100 (BST)   Sober Septmeber has replaced the silly season - holidays fade rapidly from memory. My summer visit to Athens and then on to the Peloponesian town of Nafplion - first capital of the newly liberated Greece in 1827 - while not as organically resplendent as Colin Mitchell's Dutch trip, was not completely without interest. Setting out from Mount Olympus at 4 pm I arrived at the Pelagos Hotel in Halkida at about 7 pm, 45 miles to the North of Athens, having covered 336 kms in just under 3 hours. Greek roads are much better nowadays than English ones, particularly the motorway linking Salonika and Athens. This is one of my favourite hotels for style in Greece. With a beautiful setting, overlooking the sea above its own private beach, and my second favourite swimming pool, it is a well designed multi level building, enhanced by a superbly furnished reception room, which includes a well stocked bar and a decent piano in good tune. The grounds are divided into 6 or 7 "themed" areas - including a chapel, a "reading" area, a "sound space", the "area of peace" and so on. Very tastefully done - not in the least bit kitsch or intrusive. Having just read in The Spectator about the apalling state of hotels in Britain - poor service, primitive comfort and ridiculously high prices we can consider ourselves lucky in this corner of the continent that there are hotels of this quality at reasonable prices - 75 euros a night including breakfast. For Greece, this is expensive. There are good restaurants in the town, the hotel food is OK and reasonably priced. The fruit was delicious! If you are coming to Athens for next year's Olympics, I would recommend Halkida. No parking problems, clean air and, apart from the Athens Metro, the only regular train service in the country - hourly from 7 am to 11 pm. At 7 euros return for a 70 km journey it won't break the bank either. I had arranged with Chris Paraskevopoulos, President of the Greek Friends of the Organ, to see the organ in the German Evangelical Church in Athens, where he is organist, and visit his house the next day. He has just taken delivery of a new Johannus 3 manual Monarke, of which he is justifiably proud. "I had trouble tearing myself away from it and going to bed" he told me when I asked him what his feelings were. It is a pleasure to play - tracker type touch, a comprehensive specification and cathedral-like reverberation, and it copes effectively with the entire repertoire. It is very responsive and has a well "voiced" sound. I thought I might have trouble with the straight pedalboard, but with a little peeping at the outer limits it presented no problems. We then proceeded to the German Evangelical Church. The organ here was a gift from that well known philanthropist, Adolf Hitler, who did so much for the organ building business in the post war years. It was, in fact, a present from the German government in 1933, and was built by Steinmeyer. 2 manuals and with a straight flat pedalboard, it is not easy to play. Quite apart from anything else the temperature in the church was around 37 celsius - about 100 fahrenheit - outside in the car you could probably have roasted a chicken. I dripped gallons onto the keys and my fingers stuck happily together in a rare display of friendship - but it didn't make for clean playing. It has electro pneumatic action - so Chris tells me - but is in need of a bit of TLC. Middle G on the Great had gone on strike, and the pallet release was not always clean - it sounded as if some of the pallets were bouncing. It was last restored in 1975 and is due for some more work now, but it will be expensive. My advice would be to replace the console and action, though the slider chests and pipework seem to be in good condition. It is well sited either side of the West Gallery, the console facing forward, the pedal chest to the left and the Hauptwerk and Schwellwerk to the right. Unfortunately the new batteries I had installed in my camera were useless, so you will have to wait until my next visit to see a photograph. The Church has good acoustics - warm and clear. There is a fine stained glass window and a further point of interest are two angels either side of the altar, also a present from Mr Hitler. The pipework is of good quality, though sitting at the console only a few feet away it is rather "in your face" - or "ear" to be more precise. The specification is : PEDAL Subbass 16 Zartbass 16 Prinzipal 8 Choralbass 4 Gemshorn 2 HAUPTWERK Prinzipal 8 Spillflote 8 Octave 4 Schwegel 2 Mixture III/IV (1 1/3) SCHWELLWERK Gedackt 8 Rohrflote 4 Prinzipal 2 Quint 1 1/3 Cymbel III It sounds well down in the church, the building blending the stops to produce a more mellifluous sound than close to. It was restored in 1975 and some changes were made to the original specification, including a 2 2/3 being partly re-used for the Quint 1 1/3. The scaling overall is quite wide - which gives the choruses a good singing tone. The pipework is mainly lead and spotted metal. The 2 pedal 16's are in fact one rank of pipes with a device which reduces the pressure for the quieter of the two. I think it is done by a valve in a box on the wind supply to the 16' rank, but it wasn't working and I am not certain of this. I could see a box on the trunking which looked as if it fulfilled this function. And so on to Nafplion. I spent the entire summer from May through to September here 14 years ago making a living as an artist. Even now you can see traces of my activities in restaurants, hotels and the National Bank. It was a very enjoyable time and convinced me that Greece was the place to stay. My original intention had been to earn my bread and butter from painting, but my plans were diverted by demands for me to teach English, Music and Art. However I got my sketch pad, brushes and paints out for this trip, and have to put the finishing touches on four new watercolours as a record of my trip. I replaced the dead batteries and took some photographs of the narrow gauge (1 metre) Peloponesian railway, which describes a circle from Corinth via Patra to Kalamata one way, and via Argos and Tripoli the other. Of particular interest is the "graveyard" at Mili, just along the coast from Nafplion. When Greece stops using an engine or carriages they are just left where they are. These are, I think, old American oil fired steam engines, gathering rust and being taken over by nature - it is, after all, about 40 years since they were last used. I am adding two albums to orgofftop, the Peloponese line and the Volos - Kalambaka line, both narrow gauge (1 m.) The photo uploader seems to be on a go slow, and will only take one photo at a time and then gives up, so it may be some time before they are complete. I also visited part of the now closed 1 metre gauge Volos - Kalambaka line. The Eastern section from Volos to Paleio Parsafalas still has the track in place, though grass is taking over and it seems to have warped a bit in the summer sun. But it could be used again without much difficulty - some maintenance seems to have been done, including painting the station signs. God knows why. The Western section from Parsafalas to Meteora Kalambaka (magnificent monasteries built on the top of rocks - think Saint Cyril's in one of the James Bond films) has had the track ripped up, presumably to foreswear any chance of restoration. It's a pity, because I travelled this line some years back, and to prove it the more observant of you can see an actual ticket in my Gallery - accessed from my home page - on the only "collage" I have ever done! It was a wonderful dreamy experience - I think I have mentioned it before - the train drifting through churchyards and farms, stopping when the spirit moved it so to do. It took 5 hours to cover about 100 miles. The short branch from Argos to Nafplion has been restored - there are two "Inter City" trains a day to and from Athens, adding to the other three trains a day in each direction from Argos. Dreamy. They put in a couple of crossing barriers with red flashing lights after the train ran into a tractor last year. Since it doesn't exceed 15 mph on this stretch I cannot see how this managed to happen, but then nor could I understand how, when I arrived in the outskirts of Nafplion, a car had just landed upside down in someone's garden. It wasn't so much the accident - for those of you whose hobby is watching cars crash there is no better place than Greece - but the fact that the one and a half metre high fence by which it was surrounded was totally undamaged. John Foss       =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : With the compliments of Adolf Hitler   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re:Schnitger From: "dballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 08:54:00 -0300   Yes, I want pictures too.   Domitila   > I have pictures...if you want to see, let me know I'll send some to you! > Shell     --- Acabe com aquelas janelinhas que pulam na sua tela. AntiPop-up UOL - =C9 gr=E1tis! http://antipopup.uol.com.br    
(back) Subject: Re: Poor thing From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 08:18:20 -0400     "I forgot one thing. My idea wouldn't work well with the larger = pipes..lol "   I think most of the big pipes one can lift the resonator and take the block right off by means of a sleeve that holds the resonator, at least so far that's been my experience.   = -Nate   "The Apprentice"              
(back) Subject: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 06:34:56 -0500   Good Morning, PipeChatters:   John wrote: > Some days I feel I am surrounded by idiots... * * * > When a reed note goes dead it will often (though > not always) be because there is some dirt which > has got between the tongue and the shallot and > is preventing it from speaking. Yesterday, the CCC pipe in our Posaune 16 was dead. I pulled the boot assembly off the pipe and separated it where I could see what was happening. There was certainly something blocking the tongue from vibrating. Rather than risk damage to the tongue, I removed the wedge and gently separated the parts. There was a very large bug. Of course, the bug was dead. It was completely dehydrated, crystalized, and took quite a bit of persuasion to break apart. A dollar bill slipped beneath the tongue would never have removed this bug. Once the schallot was clean, everything was replaced. However, the character of the pipe changed. It is much more "flappy, clappy" and has lost its pedal heaviness. In fact, with the tuning wire pulled completely "up," its lowest pitch is about a third above CCC but not anywhere close to the tone that it should have. In spite of being careful with the piece parts, and I have pulled reeds apart many times, I seem to be the only "person" who had hands on and could be responsible for the change in the speech properties changing. Bummer. Let me add that when I first got the tongue in the light where I could see what was happening, the bug was wedged in the crack between the schallot and the tonge. So I raise the question, is it possible the bug pushed so hard to get out of his entrapment the curvature of the tongue was distorted? I'd like to hear your best thoughts on the subject. We can speculate on the causes and effects, but I have a CCC pedal Posaune 16 that will not play for services tomorrow. Bummer. Gotta get back in the Swell chamber and finish tuning this beautiful beast. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Weekly Tunings From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 08:45:07 -0400   "When I was in grad school one of the practice organs was a small = Casavant"   There's a Casavant tracker like that at the divinity school at yale... = I tuned the Sordun in mid-August, I should check up on it!   At any rate, as the Casavants age the reeds tend to settle down. = There's a beautiful small Casavant at the Sacred Heart Church in Taftville, CT = that I tuned about 2 weeks ago and those reeds took to pitch with little = effort. 2 days ago I tuned another 3 manual Casavant at Trinity Lutheran in New Haven, likewise, not counting the dirty reeds they didn't give much fuss. That Trinity organ is a very nice instrument if anyone has a chance to = hear it, it has 4 16' stops in the pedal!!   Yesterday we tuned the Moller at St. John's in North Haven, CT. Before we tuned we put up cloth behind the facade openings, before the = temperature difference between the great and swell was over a degree! After it had = been up for an hour that difference was within 3/10 of a degree.   = -Nate   "The Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 08:54:03 -0400   > In spite of being careful with the piece parts, and > I have pulled reeds apart many times, I seem to be > the only "person" who had hands on and could be > responsible for the change in the speech properties > changing. Bummer.   Hello,   Can you get the speech quality back at the spring and tune the pipe at the scroll?   = -Nate   "The Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: RE: History..Spanish Organs From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 06 Sep 2003 08:06:31 -0500   At 08:23 PM 9/5/03 +0200, you wrote:   >I take this opportunity to let you know a very interesting website of the >spanish organiste Pilar Cabrera, playing on the romantic pipe organ of the >Cathedral in Bruges (Belgium). You can hear her concert and download the >music if you want >www.pilarcabrera.com/concerts/bruges/ > >I hope you enjoy it >Vincent Lefevre   I heartily second Vincent's suggestion. Pilar Cabrera is one of the=20 foremost Spanish concert organists. I discovered her last year when I was=20 doing a report for a class on Spanish organs. During my research I found=20 some wonderful resources in webpages developed by Michael Reckling studios= =20 in Marbella, Spain. He is a fantastic photographer and his pictures are=20 absolutely gorgeous. Michael is also an organist and has documented organs throughout Spain.=20 There are many restored eighteenth century organs and the case work of many= =20 of them is magnificent. Michael Reckling is responsible for spearheading a= =20 campaign to install an organ in Marbella's main church, "Our Lady of=20 Encarnation". Taken with the marvelous acoustics of the church, The idea=20 came to him, to build an organ in Marbella's church that would not only=20 serve for workshop, but would also familiarize tourists and inhabitants=20 with classical organ music. The Parson at that time, Monse=F1or Rodrigo=20 Bocanegra, enthusiastically took over Michael Reckling's initiative to= =20 build a new organ, the previous instrument having been burned and=20 destroyed one October night during the Spanish Civil War. The final result= =20 was one of the most significant Spanish instruments of the 20th century. In= =20 addition to the clips of the Bruges concert there are clips of the Marbella= =20 organ and many of the other significant historic Spanish organs on Pilar=20 Cabrera's website. Pilar's website was also developed by Micheal Recklings studios. The=20 following addresses contain a wealth of both audio and photographic=20 information on Spanish instruments.   http://www.pilarcabrera.com   MICHAEL RECKLING STUDIOS Exclusive Audiovisual Productions www.magicMarbella.com www.magicSpain.com   Jon C. Habermaas=20    
(back) Subject: Talented organ builders From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 07:11:18 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   There ya go! Isn't it tremendous that an organ builder/technician/voicer (whatever) can enjoy an international reputation for all the right reasons?   It isn't all about organists and music all the time, and the performers among us owe people such as Ed Stout a great deal.   Great organ builders....even just good ones....are a rare breed of very talented people who have that special "third ear".   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> wrote: > Hi Colin, > Indeed he is. I would be nearly willing to kill > for the opportunity to > work beside and learn from this man.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 07:19:54 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   My God!   How big WAS this bug?   :-0   Regards, Colin Mitchell UK     --- F Richard Burt <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote: > There was a > very large bug. So I raise the question, is it > possible the > bug pushed so hard to get out of his entrapment the > curvature of the tongue was distorted?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Organists as tuners From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 07:38:04 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Arie brings up an interesting point.   When I had a Dutch organist of distinction give a recital here in the UK, he EXPECTED me to make sure that the organ was in tune between practise and concert!   "I always tune notes before a concert", he informed me.   I think, Arie, that it is part of the training in the Netherlands, and why not?   Violinists and harpsichordists do it!   I often tickle the Positive ranks, which enjoy direct sunlight from a window.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     > >>> ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com 09/05/03 2:47 PM >>> > Hi, > > I was told many years ago that in Holland the > resident organist, tuned > the > reeds by himself, usually on Saturday night, when > he/she prepared for > Sunday services   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "C. Joseph Nichols" <cjn@nicholsandsimpson.com> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 09:49:54 -0500   "F Richard Burt" wrote:   > Once the schallot was clean, everything was replaced. > However, the character of the pipe changed. It is > much more "flappy, clappy" and has lost its pedal > heaviness. In fact, with the tuning wire pulled > completely "up," its lowest pitch is about a third > above CCC but not anywhere close to the tone that > it should have. > > In spite of being careful with the piece parts, and > I have pulled reeds apart many times, I seem to be > the only "person" who had hands on and could be > responsible for the change in the speech properties > changing. Bummer.     There should be some sort of mark on the shallot to indicate how far into the block it should be inserted. ALWAYS check for this mark BEFORE taking = a reed apart. The shallots are not always inserted right on this mark for several reasons, sloppy construction being only one of them. If = necessary, make a mark then take everything apart.   If the shallot is too far into the block the pitch is likely to be too sharp. Also make sure the wedge is inserted "right side up". Many wedges are not symetrical, the aluminum ones used by Schopp are but one example. If the wedge is sticking too far out of the block it can prevent the = tuning wire from going up far enough to tune the pipe.   Of course, it is possible the curve has been distorted. Hope this helps before the service tomorrow.   C. Joseph Nichols Nichols & Simpson, Inc. www.nicholsandsimpson.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Schnitger From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 06 Sep 2003 11:04:38 -0400   On 9/5/03 10:04 PM, "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> wrote:   > I have pictures...if you want to see, let me know I'll send some to you!   I'd enjoy them more than I can describe!   Thank you, Shell, for your description of Cappel--and the munitions = factory!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Wandering reeds and large organs From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 11:59:11 EDT   Postings have batted about the subjects of unstable reeds and large organs for several days now. These are two very different matters, and let = us not make blanket statements about large organs. The tuning variances within = The Crystal Cathedral organ are due more to it being in a glass box in = California than to its size. Pretty obvious stuff. Reeds go out of tune for several reasons, some of which have been = touched upon by other list members. Resonator length can be a major factor; short =   resonators are less stable, and "dead length" resonators, as featured by = one of the builders that has been blasted in recent postings, can be a real = problem. Once a builder has a fetish for dead length resonators, there is little = one can do to convince them otherwise. Just pick your season for use... Reed voicers finish their curves so that there is some consistency to optimal tonal quality over a reasonable range of tuning on the wire. If a = note sounds beautiful at only one pitch, one can abandon any hopes of decent = regu lation. That's why good reed voicers are respected for their work, and = amateur tuning and "voicing" have been discouraged for generations. Whether one tunes on the wire or on the scroll (if an organbuilder = deigns to provide scrolls) is an ongoing and furious debate amongst = professionals. Pipemakers enjoy a tremendous income generated by tuners, paid or = otherwise, who damage pipes beyond tunability by vandalizing the scrolls.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City ..  
(back) Subject: weekly tuning VISITS From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 12:16:36 EDT   Okay, folks. Let's put on our thinking caps and not be manipulative. NOBODY has said that an organ gets fully tempered and tuned every = week. We all know what is being said here, no matter how argumentative we = wish to be. If an enormous organ is tempered and through-tuned cyclically (in rotation), it may, in fact, be months before the curator returns to a = particular rank or division (exclusive of touch-ups or radically slipped notes). Some churches really do choose to keep their pipe organs in good tune = and repair. Others only call somebody to whack on the Oboe twice a year, = either because they do not know, or do not care.  
(back) Subject: Re: weekly tuning VISITS From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 13:01:29 EDT   In a message dated 9/6/03 11:17:24 AM Central Daylight Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > Some churches really do choose to keep their pipe organs in good tune = and > repair. Others only call somebody to whack on the Oboe twice a year, = either > because they do not know, or do not care.   LOL! Now that's good (and painfully TRUE!) heheh =3DoD   Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.    
(back) Subject: Zoltan Kodaly From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 06 Sep 2003 12:25:33 -0500   Howdy. I was listening to a CD I've owned for a while last night on the way to my brother's birthday dinner. There was a piece, a Prelude or Praeludium in D flat major, by Zoltan Kodaly, a lovely piece in an understated way. Inasmuch as I've said that, you will probably discern that the CD was of John Near at the Mother Church.   Questions:   (1) How would one go about finding this piece? Would it be part of the "Epigrams" that John Henderson lists in his directory?   (2) Does anyone recommend any other Kodaly organ works for purchase and performance?   (3) Does anyone recommend any CD performances of Kodaly organ works?   Thanks.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Zoltan Kodaly From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 10:48:56 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I have this piece. I have mentioned it before. I play it a lot. It is one of my favourites.   It is quite a passionate piece of music; beautifully written, and yet perfectly suited to a warm sounding baroque organ. The ending is a bit strange, and really calls for some sort of adaptation, but this doesn't deatrct from the composer's intentions.   We had some discussions about Czech, Polish and Hungarian organ music some time ago, and it is quite a treasure chest of relatively little known works. There's a lot of Dutch music which also deserves to be better known, as my recent rave about the delightful "Psalm 75" by Klaas Bolt suggested. I don't know whether this one is in print, but if it ain't, I shall transcribe it from the CD.   Yet again, the Kodaly "praeludiem" at St Bavo,Haarlem, where they seem to find some superb "almost unknown" music for the recitals.   The Spanish composer Torres has been this year's discovery at Haarlem, and if I can get hold of his gorgeous music, I shall do so.   I feel sure that the publisher of the Kodaly is Universal, but until I go to church, I cannot check for certain.   Light green cover!   Kodaly wrote something else for organ, but again, the details are on the back of the music I have, so I cannot tell you what it is called.   More later.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote: > Howdy. I was listening to a CD I've owned for a > while last night on the > way to my brother's birthday dinner. There was a > piece, a Prelude or > Praeludium in D flat major, by Zoltan Kodaly, a > lovely piece in an > understated way   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com