PipeChat Digest #3943 - Sunday, September 7, 2003
 
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: the ideal church job
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Job in St. Louis?
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Zoltan Kodaly
  by <dbaker@lawyers.com>
OUTSTANDING THEATRE ORGAN C.D. (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Kodaly; Dvorak
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
What is mean tempered tuning?
  by "Fran Walker" <fwalker@northwestern.edu>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Kodaly; Dvorak
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Iberian chamades and NYC Gluck
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: In paradisum
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: In paradisum
  by "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net>
RE: Job in St. Louis?
  by "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com>
Re: What is mean tempered tuning?
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Good Evening
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
IRC?
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Kodaly; Dvorak
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 06:51:50 -0500   F Richard Burt wrote:   > >Since I found the dead bug's remains firmly stuck between >the tongue and the schallot, I am beginning to wonder if >that pressure by the bug to get out through that little >gap was sufficient enough to change the tongue's curvature. > > I rather doubt that the pressure of a bug, however big, could have been enough to distort the tongue. You mentioned that the note was CCC, so the tongue would be quite a large one, and I wonder if it was weighted. Is there any evidence that a weight has fallen off?   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: the ideal church job From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2003 10:37:09 +0100   Sorry if I'm butting into a private conversation, but I can't help = observing how different things are in different places (obvious, but true).   -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@cox.net <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 05 September 2003 12:01 Subject: Re: the ideal church job     >They cut my salary, increased my hours, and instituted a steep schedule >of monetary fines if I missed a service or rehearsal on account of >illness   'Fines' ..... for not going to church ? (even if it is after you have made = a commitment) ..... Wow.   There WERE fines for not going to church, but that was 500 years ago (and that was really as part of a politically motivated campaign of = suppression).   >> >> P.S. I'll bet the vestry is responsible for the choir turning on you. >> They probably told the choir lies about you in order to turn them = against >> you.     And there were times when you left the choir alone ? "Work 'em hard, and work 'em often; then send them home exhausted" No time for idle ears to listen to idle tongues   'How different things are ......... "   Harry Grove [a.k.a. 'musicman;]      
(back) Subject: Job in St. Louis? From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 11:43:49 -0400   Dear Listers,   I have a colleague who's not on the list who is forced, due to a family situation, to relocate to St. Louis either during this choir year or at the end of it at the latest. If you know of any jobs, resources, or people to contact in the area, could you respond privately to me and I'll pass them on to him? His experience includes extensive public school choral (all levels), church choir (adult, youth, brass choir, handbells), accompanying (piano and organ). Quite a prolific arranger and has some published works.   Thanks,   Chuck Peery Cincinnati    
(back) Subject: Zoltan Kodaly From: <dbaker@lawyers.com> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 12:47:16 -0400   For other organ music of Kodaly, might I suggest the Prelude and the Ite, Missa Est from the Missa Brevis? The mass itself is terrific, and those two organ-only movements are well-done, as well. (N.B.: there is a CHORAL Ite as well as an organ only version).   David Baker    
(back) Subject: OUTSTANDING THEATRE ORGAN C.D. (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 15:51:55 EDT   Hello Everyone   I apologize ahead of time if this has already been posted, but I had to writ= e=20 on this one. If you do not currently have Lew Williams' "Fanfare" in your C= D=20 collection, order it TODAY and have it overnight mailed!   Recorded on the fabulous Mesa Organ Stop organ, boasting 73 ranks and 5500=20 pipes, Lew plays a tour-de-force program that not only shows off the vast=20 resources of this very special Wurlitzer theatre pipe organ but also his own= =20 impeccable technique and style. =20   I have known Lew well for many years, but never have I heard him play with=20 this much excitement, variety, elegance and panache. He is one of the very=20= few=20 organists who is truly well versed in both theatre and classical organ and w= ho=20 plays both equally well. As we all know, piano practice is excellent for an= y=20 organist's technique. I know that he faithfully practices the piano with=20 scales and arpeggios and other such exercises for at least two hours daily (= oh=20 that I had the time to do so myself!) and, believe me, it shows in this=20 recording!=20   This would be one of those rare CDs that is "perfect" in every way: organ,=20 organist, repertoire, variety, contrast, registrations and overall performan= ce.=20 Each and every track shows yet another nuance of this incredible organ. =20 Both the organ and this CD are beyond an A+! The program consists of the=20 following listed below, along with some personal observations:   1. Cabaret A rousing opener indeed. From the introduction which is straight out of the= =20 score, one knows that a good time is in store for the next 64 minutes and 20= =20 seconds of the CD. Lew takes us through the opening selection complete with= =20 the verses from the original soundtrack on the brass stops of the organ=20 (trumpets and tubas). The opening chorus demonstrates that beautiful and ve= ry unique=20 Organ Stop full organ sound.   2. Spanish Eyes Ol=E9! Move over, Carmen Miranda! The Marimbas and very gentle percussions= of=20 the Mesa organ are used to maximum effect here. Lew coaxes rich, breezy=20 choruses of voxes and soft flutes out of the instrument punctuated just at t= he=20 precise, right moments in the music.   3. Colonel Bogey March As I listened to this one on the way to church this morning, I found myself=20 laughing out loud and saying "you go, Lew!" as Colonel Bogey played me down=20 Walnut Grove Road. Interestingly, the final chorus demonstrates a stop whic= h is,=20 I believe, a Military Fife (some other listers might be able to shed a bit=20 more light on this stop). It's prominence is obvious and is pretty exciting= as=20 the march winds down to a close.   4. Moonlight Sonata Haunting and lyrical, this is a most thoughtful and beautifully executed=20 transcription of Beethoven's famous piano sonata. It is always so enjoyable= to=20 hear how different organists hear and transcribe other works to the theatre=20= pipe=20 organ. This is a very elegant and refined example of the transcribers art=20 and Lew subtly maintains Beethoven's piano riff in the left hand with the=20 discreet use of the marimba while sustaining the right hand chords with vari= ous=20 vox/soft string/soft flute registrations in a most ethereal manner. Very ni= ce=20 indeed.   5. Toccata This piece by John Weaver is known to classical organists as treacherously=20 difficult and overly challenging technically. Lew uses some very interestin= g=20 registrations in the way he introduces the numerous expositions of the theme= ,=20 and energetically displays the Wurlitzer's classical side. This toccata, as= =20 well as the "Carillon-Sortie" and "Thou Art the Rock," both by Mulet, displa= y=20 Lew's thorough classical training and technique which is both rock solid and= =20 flawless. Interestingly we hear principal choruses, reed choruses (with eve= n a=20 post horn!) and string-dominated choruses used very successfully and with gr= eat=20 effect. Bravissimo Lew!   6. Hawaiian Wedding Song This one absolutely gave me goosebumps! Beautifully played and richly=20 registered. It is a Tibia/Vox/Sax banquet! One is almost transported to t= he=20 Islands and, once again, the marimba is used with great effect. One can alm= ost see=20 Elvis floating down that river on a bamboo raft bedecked with thousands of=20 multi colored flowers singing this song in "Blue Hawaii." The introduction=20= also=20 demonstrates the organ's chimes and its wonderful Vibraharp. This one is=20 definitely a keeper!   7. Fiddle Faddle All I can say on this one is "fasten your seatbelts!" My LORD those fingers= =20 are flying!!! I have heard many organists play this song, and Lew's renditi= on=20 is fresh and new with some very interesting and extremely musical=20 countermelodies and accents throughout. Fraught with energy and spontaneity= ..   8. Gone With the Wind A triumph! Having recorded "King Kong March" on my own new CD from the Iowa= =20 Theatre Barton, I am now but have always been partial to the music of Max=20 Steiner. This opens with a luscious, rich introduction and sounds very "Old= =20 Hollywood." It sounds, truly SOUNDS like the soundtrack from "Gone With the= Wind" =20 The familiar melody, referred to as "Tara's Theme" is beautifully played, o= f=20 course, with the most appropriate references to "Dixie" included as well. W= e=20 also hear a solo melody on the clarinet or basset horn, I am not sure which.   9. The Flight of the Bumblebee Joyce Jones and Hector Olivera played it with the melody on the pedals, and=20 now we have a true transcription that very closely mirrors Rimsky-Korsakov's= =20 original score. Very well played and orchestrated!   10. Moon River This old chestnut is sure to bring back many memories of days gone by. They= =20 just don't write them that way anymore, and once again Lew breaths a breath=20= of=20 fresh air into this beloved and time-tested ballad. (Love that Style D=20 Trumpet!)   11. Thou Art the Rock The famous toccata-movement from Mulet's "Byzantine Sketches" is played here= ,=20 once again demonstrating the Mesa Wurlitzer's classical side. Lew handles=20 the piece solidly and elegantly yet with enough restraint that it does not s= eem=20 frantic as some organists, unfortunately, play it. In fact, I don't believe= I=20 have ever heard it played THIS clearly and rhythmically vigorous in the fact= =20 that every single duplet can clearly be heard and distinguished. Bravo,=20 again, Lew!   12. Serenata Pensively played, "Serenata" shows yet another melodic and lush side of the=20 Mesa instrument's vast resources and Lew's keen ability to modulate and meld= =20 one section into another seamlessly. Another wonderful old chestnut given a= =20 beautiful treatment by the artist.   13. Bugler's Holiday This is another fun one. The Organ Stop's antiphonal Trompette En Chamade i= s=20 used to herald out the main melody. Only a well rehearsed and solid=20 technique, such as Lew's here, could get the 16th-note repetitions that clea= r. It's=20 nice to also hear the contrasts between untremmed and tremmed choruses. Tha= t's=20 a really neat effect when properly used. (I can think of another new=20 recording on a certain rhinestone-bedecked Barton in the Midwest that uses t= hose=20 contrasting chorus effects nicely!)=20   14. Ave Maria Anyone who has ever heard this at a wedding or at Roman Catholic Liturgy=20 will recall the warm feeling that occurs when this piece is sung or played.=20= Here=20 it is tenderly played, in the wonderful key of Ab (for vocalists that is) an= d=20 is a beautiful tribute to the Blessed Mother whose birthday, incidentally, i= s=20 celebrated in the Roman Church tomorrow, Monday, 8 September.   15. Carillon Sortie Another classical powerhouse and one of my favorites. While not as=20 technically challenging as Weaver's Toccata, this piece has become one of th= e favorite=20 compositions of the classical repertoire. Another testament to Lew's=20 wonderful technique and the Mesa organ's vast flexibility. My gosh what pow= er that=20 organ has!   16. A Salute To the American Armed Forces=20 (American Patrol - Columbia the Gem of the Ocean - The Army, Marines, Navy=20 and Air Force Songs - Battle Hymn of the Republic - Eternal Father, Strong=20= To=20 Save - My Country 'tis of Thee - America the Beautiful - This is My Country=20= -=20 This Land is Your Land - God Bless America)   What can I say? This closing medley is a wonderful tribute to America, to=20 freedom and all that our country stands for. Lew takes us on one final and=20 energetic tour through the organ (and, most tastefully, its percussions!) an= d=20 closes the recording with a real toe-tapper of a patriotic medley!   The CD is available from Organ Stop at   Organ Stop Recordings 1149 East Southern Avenue Mesa, AZ 85204 (480) 813-5700, ext. 200, Fax: ext. 222   or through the Organ Stop's website at:   <A HREF=3D"http://www.organstoppizza.com/welcome.htm">http://www.organstoppi= zza.com/welcome.htm</A>   Click on "Online Music Sales and you'll see it and other fine recordings of=20 the organ that are available.   Thanks to everyone for reading and I hope you will enjoy the recording as=20 much as I have. It is indeed an honor to know people like Lew and Tom Hazle= ton,=20 both long time close friends and colleagues who, while certainly not "aged,"= =20 are definitely revered veterans of the theatre pipe organ and its music and=20 loved by all who know and hear them. Thanks, Lew, for an outstanding record= ing,=20 in every way.   And to the readers here today, when you get "Fanfare," enjoy- you won't be=20 sorry!   Scott Foppiano Memphis, Tennessee    
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 16:22:45 -0500   Hello, John: You asked: > I rather doubt that the pressure of a bug, however big, > could have been enough to distort the tongue. You > mentioned that the note was CCC, so the tongue would > be quite a large one, ....approximately 5-1/2 inches from bottom end of wedge. > ...and I wonder if it was weighted. No. That question was raised by another person, so I pulled the CCC# boot. No weight has been added to the tongue in the nearest neighboring note. > Is there any evidence that a weight has fallen off? Interesting question. Since I did not find any weight on the CCC# note, I have to assume that no weights were involved. This is the lowest note in our Pedal Posaune 16 (56 notes in this rank to play 8- and 4-foot pitches, too). This organ was built by Schantz, ca. 1997-ish and installed in our church in 1979. Tomorrow, I will address the question of corrective action directly to Schantz. Maybe they will get rich off my importunity. <grins> I am still open to suggestions about corrective action. Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Kodaly; Dvorak From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 16:26:43 -0500   Can anyone point me to the publisher for Kodaly's organ works? Would it be Barenreiter? I think Longhurst did the Prelude from the Pange lingua at the Conference Center at the SLC AGO Conference, but I don't remember right now whether I liked it, and cannot hum a few bars for you.   Re Dvorak, Barenreiter came out with an urtext edition of his preludes and fugues back in 1980. I bought it, and was somewhat disappointed, although I love Dvorak. For those of you looking for his organ music, you can see if this volume is still in print.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of dbaker@lawyers.com   For other organ music of Kodaly, might I suggest the Prelude and the Ite, Missa Est from the Missa Brevis? The mass itself is terrific, and those two organ-only movements are well-done, as well. (N.B.: there is a CHORAL Ite as well as an organ only version).        
(back) Subject: RE: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 17:58:32 -0400   It was written:   Interesting question. Since I did not find any weight on the CCC# note, I have to assume that no weights were involved. That's an assumption I wouldn't make. I'd check at least 5 and look for adhesive residue on the tongues before concluding there had never been any weights. Just a thought, Andrew Mead          
(back) Subject: What is mean tempered tuning? From: "Fran Walker" <fwalker@northwestern.edu> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 11:26:15 -0700   One of my friends plays a Wilhelm organ which has mean-tempered tuning. = He hates it. What is mean tempered tuning? Fran Walker Organist, North Shore Methodist Church Glencoe, Il     ************************************************** Fran Walker (fwalker@northwestern.edu)      
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 17:55:05 -0400   On 9/7/03 5:22 PM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > This organ was built by Schantz, ca. 1997-ish and installed > in our church in 1979. > Is that as difficult as it sounds, or even more so?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Kodaly; Dvorak From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 18:20:29 EDT   In a message dated 9/7/2003 4:32:20 PM Central Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes:   > > Can anyone point me to the publisher for Kodaly's organ works? Would it > be Barenreiter? I think Longhurst did the Prelude from the Pange lingua > at the Conference Center at the SLC AGO Conference, but I don't remember > right now whether I liked it, and cannot hum a few bars for you. >   Pretty sure, Glenda, that it's UNIVERSAL - an oblong publication (as if = that matters!) Just looked it up (I'm lazybones, today!) and Corliss Arnold's = book says: Praeludia (5), Universal 7941a and Pange Lingua, Universal 7941; = also Boosey & Hawkes.   (perhaps B & H represents or are agents for UNIVERSAL).   Dale    
(back) Subject: Iberian chamades and NYC Gluck From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 18:37:58 -0400   On 9/6/03 4:05 PM, "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:   >> 2 - I used to have a picture of a Spanish organ that had a Chemade >> trumpet that sort of radiated from the bottom of the center tower, does = it >> sound familiar to anyone? > > Very. Can't dig it out today, but I'll try tomorrow afternoon. I doubt > that's unique. > > Alan   Well, I sort of promised, but subsequent posts (notably one from Seb) = FARRR exceeded the pitiful information I could I have provided--so I think I should let it go.   Speaking of which, Seb: Christ Church, lower east side. 19th/20th St. Advertising for a new organist. A potential applicant has asked my = opinion. I have none; utterly unfamiliar with it. Would you care to say anything? Lousy people to work for? Good intentions but small budget? Fantastic machine? Whatever.   Words on this list will reach her; if you prefer, post to me offlist, and I'll forward. Within a matter of hours you'll know who she is anyway.   Alan   Thanks.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 17:43:28 -0500   Hi, Andrew and Alan: Yawl wrote: > That's an assumption I wouldn't make. I'd check at > least 5 and look for adhesive residue on the tongues > before concluding there had never been any weights. > Just a thought, > Andrew Mead I also assume that adhesive leaves some kind of residue on the tongue. Can't see any. The other pipes all play with proper timber and pitch. This one did until the Big Bug got in the schallot. Although I checked the CCC# pipe for differences, I did not check "five" of them. This is an idea worth following up on. > > This organ was built by Schantz, ca. 1997-ish and installed > > in our church in 1979. > Is that as difficult as it sounds, or even more so? Lost the antecedent. <grins> What is difficult?   Oooops!!! Now I see it. <sheepish grin> Let's try built in ca. 1977-ish.   The Schantz shop load was about two years in the late 1970s, so I concluded that they began work on this organ about two years before the installation. This whole story is convoluted, however. There are so many inconsistencies in this organ that I wonder if it was a "put together" project to take up the slack where another customer expanded their project in mid-build. We will probably never know. <grins> I've nursed this organ along for the past four years and some of the works are better now. It has a long way to go. This is the first problem that I have found that was caused by a "creature" getting into the pipe works. I will install a new rocker-tab coupler assembly on the name board before the end of September. That will correct a bunch of problems the organist has now with coupler action that does not work properly. Will be glad to have that one done, for the organist's sake. Just because this is my home church, I have a personal interest that goes a bit beyond another organ to tune every three months or so. However, I do not push my services beyond reasonable efforts without being properly compensated. They are just now beginning to feel the effects of what happens when something goes wrong that is outside the defined services of our agreement. Education is a wonderful but sometimes slow process. <grins> This "big bug" will cost them something. Regardless of how much I complain about the pain of doing some of the work, it's a "keeper." We will keep it playing if at all possible. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Big Bug (formerly poor thing) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 18:51:52 -0400   On 9/7/03 6:43 PM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > What is difficult?   I was wondering whether it was difficult for Schantz to build an organ in "ca. 1997-ish" and install it "in [one's] church in 1979." Now, I KNOW = that I'm missing something here, and I'm going to look like a fool. But, whatever. Been there before.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: In paradisum From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 18:57:29 EDT   henry mulet's esquisses byzantines contains a movement called 'in = paradisum' -- it's right before the famous 'tu es petra.' don't know if it's based = on the chant or not.  
(back) Subject: Re: In paradisum From: "Stan Yoder" <vze2myh5@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 18:58:48 -0400   Gerald Near has a lovely, tender treatment in his "St. Augustine's" = collection. Available through Morningstar.   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh    
(back) Subject: RE: Job in St. Louis? From: "Mari" <mreive@tampabay.rr.com> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 19:29:01 -0400   Tim Allen is OC/M at one of the Episcopal churches there. (The Cathedral maybe?) I for the life of me can't remember. The AGO Chapter would be a good starting place. Mari St Petersburg   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Charles Peery Sent: Sunday, September 07, 2003 11:44 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Job in St. Louis?     Dear Listers,   I have a colleague who's not on the list who is forced, due to a family situation, to relocate to St. Louis either during this choir year or at the end of it at the latest. If you know of any jobs, resources, or people to contact in the area, could you respond privately to me and I'll pass them on to him? His experience includes extensive public school choral (all levels), church choir (adult, youth, brass choir, handbells), accompanying (piano and organ). Quite a prolific arranger and has some published works.   Thanks,   Chuck Peery Cincinnati   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: What is mean tempered tuning? From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 09:07:02 -0700   That would be "mean tone" Fran, and for most music other than ancient music in certain keys it would sound "mean" indeed.. It is one of the older temperaments abandoned many years ago for other than specialised instruments intended to play music from the early days. Some keys sound way out of tune. Others sound OK. If your friend likes playing music of modern composers I don't blame him for "hating" it!!! Bob Elms.   Fran Walker wrote:   > One of my friends plays a Wilhelm organ which has mean-tempered > tuning. He hates it. > What is mean tempered tuning? > Fran Walker > Organist, North Shore Methodist Church > Glencoe, Il > > ************************************************** > Fran Walker (fwalker@northwestern.edu) >      
(back) Subject: Good Evening From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2003 20:43:50 -0400   Hi all,   Yet another question to throw out into the open (I'm an apprentice, I need to know these things!) Are there any extant tubular-pneumatic organs in CT or southern New England?     Many thanks,   Nate   "The Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: IRC? From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 18:03:49 -0700   I've done ENOUGH work for ONE day (grin).   I'll be on as soon as I sit on the porch for awhile and COOL OFF! = (chuckle)   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: Kodaly; Dvorak From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 2003 20:02:27 -0500   I believe they are, Dale. I checked the web site after asking the question, but the Barenreiter site only listed two organ works by Kodaly =96 albeit a pile of choral pieces.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of ProOrgo53@aol.com   Pretty sure, Glenda, that it's UNIVERSAL - an oblong publication (as if that matters!) Just looked it up (I'm lazybones, today!) and Corliss Arnold's book says: Praeludia (5), Universal 7941a=A0=A0 and=A0 Pange = Lingua, Universal 7941; also Boosey & Hawkes.   (perhaps B & H represents or are agents for UNIVERSAL).