PipeChat Digest #3945 - Monday, September 8, 2003
 
Re: Job opening, Christ Lutheran, NYC
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Pipe Organs afloat
  by <FUMCBA@aol.com>
RE:Weekly Tuning
  by "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at>
Yacht tracker
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Bach before the mast
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Good Evening
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Bach before the mast
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: Bach before the mast
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Various organs
  by "Peter Rodwell" <ioftest@telefonica.net>
Re: What is mean tempered tuning?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Bach before the mast
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Iberian chamades and NYC Gluck
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What is mean tempered tuning?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: What is mean tempered tuning?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: History
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Yacht tracker
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: What is mean tempered tuning?
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Yacht tracker
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Bach underground
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What is mean tempered tuning?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Bach underground
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Bach underground
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Job opening, Christ Lutheran, NYC From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 06:49:10 EDT   Dear Alan: Christ Lutheran, like many small churches, is struggling financially, = and truly has been for quite some time. The limited salary is a combination of =   true budget constraints, and the general trend of organists getting paid = very little, because they have not made clergy and congregations of all = denominations aware of their value, and their position has been devalued by = church-loving pianists who volunteer to play for free. I have worked with Christ Church through the tenures of their last = three musicians. The last organist was, in fact, a real organist, and I do not = know the full circumstances of the dissolution of his relationship with the = church. His predecessor left on good terms; he was not an organist, but a pianist-composer, and his life took on a different direction when he = composed the music for a Tony Award-Winning musical, infamously called "Urinetown." The organ is neither fantastic nor a machine. It is an early one, and small -- very small. It is a extension organ, all unenclosed, inspired by Northeast German sounds. It has four extended manual ranks and one pedal = rank, with preparations for more, which seem completely unlikely. When I built the instrument, the congregation were adamant that they have a real pipe = organ, and I was contracted to build the organ, redesign the chancel, and provide a better acoustic. The altar was moved forward from the back wall, where the organ = now frames the window, and I managed to coax a couple of seconds of added reverberation from the room. It replaced the remnants of a 19th century = organ from their old church, which was butchered beyond recognition by a famous local in = the 1970s. Rearranged ortions of the mahogany case, and a single, large, = double-rise reservoir were retained from that instrument. Your friend must decide whether it is worth it to her, and she should definitely call the pastor and ask her as many questions as she needs = answered. I cannot say one way or another what it is like to work with them on a =   weekly basis, as an employee involved in the worship services. Certainly, = the Pastor has her own convictions about the way she conducts liturgy, but = that appears to be true of all clergy. Fortunately, I have not had personality = clashes with clergy; the only "lousy people to work for" that I ever encountered = was an incoming organist who was too arrogant to meet me face-to-face. Best of luck to your hopeful friend -- if the situation and the = chemistry are right, she may be willing to overlook the low compensation.   Sebastian   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organs afloat From: <FUMCBA@aol.com> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 07:36:08 EDT   In a message dated 9/8/2003 12:33:30 AM Central Daylight Time, bnorth@intergate.ca writes:   > I know this subject came up some time ago, and was surprised as I read a =   > yachting magazine tonight. I came across a pipe organ on board a yacht!   Interesting! I once tuned a piano on a sail boat...   -Bill Rowland Broken Arrow, OK    
(back) Subject: RE:Weekly Tuning From: "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 13:54:28 +0200   Hi Listmembers.,   I followed the discussion about weekly tuning with certain interest. In Europe, tuning of reeds by organists is common practice, especially reeds before concert. Practically all of my organist-friends do that. I think = the organist gets a far better feeling for the instrument if he does some maintenance work.   The frequency depends on how stable the rank is. I exercise fairly often = on "my" organ, and my policy is - if you hear during exercising that a pipe = is severely out of tune, get into the organ and fix it. It's just 10' and = saves a lot of money and time in the long run. I tune practically everything = except mixtures, but "my" organ is only a 17/II. If the entire stop needs tuning (e.g. the Rohrschalmey 8'), I spend a Saturday afternoon.   regards, Thomas     -- DI Thomas Mohr Institute of Cancer Research - Vienna University Borschkegasse 8a A-1090 Vienna Austria Tel ++43 (1) 4277 65160 Fax ++43 (1) 4277 65196    
(back) Subject: Yacht tracker From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 08:47:06 -0400   That sounds like the tracker built by organbuilder Stefan Meier of Athol = MA which I saw in the workshop before installation. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Bach before the mast From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 06:42:54 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Knowing of the connection between organists and trains, I wonder if anyone knows of trains which carried organs?   The most famous example has to be the big touring Moller built for the cinema/theatre organist Reginald Foort, which was enclosed in five big boxes. These were hoisted onto railways bogey-bolsters (or some such) and sent to various parts of the UK.   Many is the time that the nightmare situation developed, when the Great and Pedal were in Derby and the rest was in Glasgow!   The other touring pipe-organ was the travelling organ built for Paxman by, of all companies, Harrison & Harrison of Durham, which eventually found its way into a school in Durham.   Many ships had pipe organs of course, but I think we chatted about that some months back.   Who will be the first to have an organ in an aeroplane I wonder?   Personally, I want an organ in a submarine, like the Nautilus and the very insane Captain Nemo; playing Bach Toccatas whilst plotting to overthrow the world.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     > bnorth@intergate.ca writes: > > > I know this subject came up some time ago, and was > surprised as I read a > > yachting magazine tonight. I came across a pipe > organ on board a yacht!     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Good Evening From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 06:48:47 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Why? Do you want a few?   This could be arranged!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Bigaquarium <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> wrote: > Are there any extant > tubular-pneumatic organs > in CT or southern New England?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach before the mast From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 09:20:48 -0500   Missionary Bishop W. D. Walker, the first Episcopal Bishop in North Dakota, outfitted a Pullman Car as a traveling cathedral, dedicated as the Church of the Advent, and went around the state in it holding Episcopal services. The "cathedral" contained a reed organ, and indeed quite a few Pullman cars did in those days and they used to have impromptu services on the train on Sundays. I have never heard of a pipe organ in a train, however. There used to be a number of pipe organs on Mississippi river boats in the nineteenth century, which the pipes specially strapped down to keep them from falling out of their holes when conditions got a little choppy. There is one of these, a Kimball portable -- and the only known Kimball portable with tracker action -- which came from a riverboat and now survives in the gallery of Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis. On the whole, however, calliopes were more popular on river boats, since they could use the steam from the steamboat's boiler. (Calliopes are not strictly speaking organs since they do not use wind -- pipe organs, reed organs, chord organs, etc., use wind and are therefore properly called organs.)   John Speller   Colin Mitchell wrote:   >Hello, > >Knowing of the connection between organists and >trains, I wonder if anyone knows of trains which >carried organs? >      
(back) Subject: Re: Bach before the mast From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 07:27:58 -0700       Colin Mitchell wrote: > Hello, > > Knowing of the connection between organists and > trains, I wonder if anyone knows of trains which > carried organs? > > Somewhere in the back of my mind is a picture of a luxurious over-the-top Victorian private railway car belonging to one of the American "robber barons" which had an organ, but it might have been a Vocalion with a pipe-top.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Various organs From: "Peter Rodwell" <ioftest@telefonica.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 16:33:03 +0200   Quoting Nate:   > Thanks for the links! For some reason all of the sudden a name came to > mind regarding that Spanish organ. Trujillo. I found the title to the = CD > that the picture came with on a website:   > On the same website there is a list of specs for the organ as well at = this > URL: http://www.aq.upm.es/organ/spcat/dat/01000003.htm   This URL is a *very* obsolete version of our Web site, which is now at:   http://www.intorg.org/   > I had no idea when I asked the question that so many Spanish organs had > radiating or otherwise non-flat chamades!   Most have chamades, both ancient and modern. Someday I really must get around to translating a treatise I have here on Spanish reedwork, which, among other things, states that the reed chorus should be treated as a mixture.   Peter Rodwell International Organ Foudation Madrid, Spain  
(back) Subject: Re: What is mean tempered tuning? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 10:34:20 -0400   On 9/7/03 10:36 PM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote:   > It is a three manual of 59 stops and 75 well tempered ranks, 29 of those > stops and 40 ranks are also available in quarter comma meantone. Eight = notes > per octave, per stop have been added to accomplish this with four notes = in > common with well temper. There are no split keys and are used either or = but > not together. > The mind absolutely BOGGLES! (Well, mine does, anyway.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach before the mast From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 09:37:37 -0500   I've always fantasized about a pipe organ in the unused City Hall station of the IRT # 1 in lower Manhattan. Imagine the reverb and harmonics!   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 06:42:54 -0700 (PDT) Subject: Bach before the mast   > Hello, > > Knowing of the connection between organists and > trains, I wonder if anyone knows of trains which > carried organs? > > The most famous example has to be the big touring > Moller built for the cinema/theatre organist Reginald > Foort, which was enclosed in five big boxes. These > were hoisted onto railways bogey-bolsters (or some > such) and sent to various parts of the UK. > > Many is the time that the nightmare situation > developed, when the Great and Pedal were in Derby and > the rest was in Glasgow! > > The other touring pipe-organ was the travelling organ > built for Paxman by, of all companies, Harrison & > Harrison of Durham, which eventually found its way > into a school in Durham. > > Many ships had pipe organs of course, but I think we > chatted about that some months back. > > Who will be the first to have an organ in an aeroplane > I wonder? > > Personally, I want an organ in a submarine, like the > Nautilus and the very insane Captain Nemo; playing > Bach Toccatas whilst plotting to overthrow the world. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > bnorth@intergate.ca writes: > > > > > I know this subject came up some time ago, and was > > surprised as I read a > > > yachting magazine tonight. I came across a pipe > > organ on board a yacht! > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software > http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Iberian chamades and NYC Gluck From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 10:44:18 -0400   On 9/7/03 10:47 PM, "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> wrote:   > Alan, > > I saw that job posted on the AGO site and the pay is pitiful.   Andrew, your post received with gratitude. I certainly do not disagree = with a word in it. By now the potential applicant has doubtless read it, too. She's a thoroughly professional person, and will understand all that is being said. I've met the pastor of the parish in question (though I don't KNOW her; her husband--pastor in a different parish--is more known by me); = I may just give her a call and pick her head a little bit.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: What is mean tempered tuning? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 10:09:38 -0500       Alan Freed wrote:   > On 9/7/03 10:36 PM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote: > > It is a three manual of 59 stops and 75 well tempered ranks, 29 of > those > stops and 40 ranks are also available in quarter comma meantone. > Eight notes > per octave, per stop have been added to accomplish this with four > notes in > common with well temper. There are no split keys and are used > either or but > not together. > > > The mind absolutely BOGGLES! (Well, mine does, anyway.) > My reaction to seeing the article about the organ in St. Cecilia's R.C. Cathedral in Omaha in this month's "Diapason" was to wonder what it would sound like if one used the meantone and equitempered stops together, perhaps in combination with the Rossignol stop. If one is going to do things this way, it would be more normal to have a lever to switch between temperaments, as was done with the Fisk at Stamford and with the eighteenth-century organ in the Foundling Hospital in London, which if I remember correctly was donated by Handel. It sounds, however, from the description that on this organ it is done by having two sets of stop controls, which would allow both temperaments to be used at once. I think it might be possible to produce a few posthumous works of John Cage to perform on this instrument. I was also surprised to see a Trichterregal. I thought we had seen the last of those with the demise of Moller.   John Speller    
(back) Subject: Re: What is mean tempered tuning? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 11:32:24 EDT   Hi Alan:   Heather Harrington has kept the list supplied with picutres from the factory, including a video, to photo's of the installation of Opus XIV. I would say that this organ is a monumental enginering feat. Two organs really residing in the same organ case. The well temper section of the organ has a note compass of 58 notes, pedal 30, the quarter comma meantone section 48 notes, pedal 28, C,D, E, F short octave. The amazing thing is there are no split keys, and either, or temperments available. The organ is tracker, with electric slider motors, to facilitate combination pistons and memory. The meantone section, is operated with side to side on off levers, compact and easy to put on and off these stops. There are in practice two sets of stop actions, one electric, for well temper, and another mechanical for quarter comma meantone. The acoustics are about 6 seconds empty, and 3 1/2 seconds full. During the renovation of the Cathedral great pains were taken to insure a lively acoustic. Martin Pasi came to finish an organ for a well known German builder in a church here in the USA and decided to stay and open his own shop in Roy, Washington. I met him during the 2000 AGO convention, a tall mild mannered gentleman. I would consider him a genius.   Heather wrote to me the other day regarding my inquirey about getting some sound clips, and she said it was in the works. Anyone not currently receiving The Diapason magazine can request a complimentary copy if available from Herbert L. Huestis at hhuestis@mdi.ce his E-mail account. Since June our own Sebastian Gluck, and Herb have offered fine articals on various aspects of organ building and tuning. I would suggest subscribing to The Diapason, a fine magazine about organs and organists. I have subscribed to it since Dec. 1956. it is the offical journal of the International Society for Organ History and Preservation. TheDiapason.com is their official web site. Osiris Organ Archive http://www.wu-wein.ac.at/earlym-l/organs   Sincerely,   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: History From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 11:39:59 -0400   On 9/5/03 11:36 AM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > I was a student in the mid-1950s. However, if you want to read the = history of > church music, that should bring you up to data, ...as of about 1950. = Much of > what has transpired since then my be classified as contemporary = happenings; > ...not to pick on contemporary music styles, but current events in the > on-going saga of church music history.   Oh, Richard, that's terribly decent of you. But no thanks.   My "book-learnin'" days ended in the 1960s, but my experience went on for another couple decades or so. At Saint Luke's we sing stuff from every decade of every whatever, and I love it. Even "know" it (but in an experiential sense, not an academic one). But at my age (71) I really = have to leave it at that. (I'm eating supper as I type, and have had two phonecalls from freelance word-processing clients in the past five = minutes. Baked potato getting cool.)   If I recall, someone asked for help with a Music History course resource, and somebody mentioned Bailey, and I wanted a TEACHER to certainly have up-to-date stuff, and wondered whether Bailey was up to that.   But thanks a BUNCH!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Yacht tracker From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 11:43:25 -0400   Hi Judy and List,   I think a check of the PipOrg-L Archives will find a discussion about a vessel rather larger than a yacht, with an interesting-looking Organ on board. I recall saving the URL for the builder, Pluer, and here it is: http://www.pluer.nl/. Click on "Journal" when you get there, and you will get, in English, everything you want to know about this Organ - on the Zaandam of the Holland Americal Lines. I think only the Dutch would do = this, bless their Organ loving hearts. Cunard will not likely follow suit any = time soon. I have the impression it is something of a fairground Organ, with an automatic player.   I first heard about it when my travel agent in Baltimore read about it in = a travel agents' magazine, and sent me a copy with picture.   Cheers,   Malcolm     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> To: "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 08, 2003 8:47 AM Subject: Yacht tracker     > That sounds like the tracker built by organbuilder Stefan Meier of Athol MA > which I saw in the workshop before installation. > Judy Ollikkala > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: What is mean tempered tuning? From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 11:48:12 EDT   Hi Alan:   I'd like to offer a correction of sorts, Sebastian Glucks articles are in The American Organist, the AGO magazine. I suppose I implied they were also in The Diapason. Both are great reading and would suggest subscribing to both     Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Yacht tracker From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 08:59:19 -0700   I had to go to the Dutch version to get "Journal", for some reason, but once there, I listened to the clip of "Mambo Italiano" ... and IMMEDIATELY had a vision of Stephen Scarlett and the sacred ministers doing the "Vogue" down the center aisle at St. Matthew's.   No, I haven't taken my meds yet today (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   Malcolm Wechsler wrote: > Hi Judy and List, > > I think a check of the PipOrg-L Archives will find a discussion about a > vessel rather larger than a yacht, with an interesting-looking Organ on > board. I recall saving the URL for the builder, Pluer, and here it is: > http://www.pluer.nl/. Click on "Journal" when you get there, and you = will > get, in English, everything you want to know about this Organ - on the > Zaandam of the Holland Americal Lines. I think only the Dutch would do = this, > bless their Organ loving hearts. Cunard will not likely follow suit any = time > soon. I have the impression it is something of a fairground Organ, with = an > automatic player. > > I first heard about it when my travel agent in Baltimore read about it = in a > travel agents' magazine, and sent me a copy with picture. > > Cheers, > > Malcolm > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> > To: "pipechat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, September 08, 2003 8:47 AM > Subject: Yacht tracker > > > >>That sounds like the tracker built by organbuilder Stefan Meier of Athol > > MA > >>which I saw in the workshop before installation. >>Judy Ollikkala >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> >> > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: Bach underground From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 13:44:52 -0400   On 9/8/03 10:37 AM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > I've always fantasized about a pipe organ in the unused City Hall = station > of the IRT # 1 in lower Manhattan. Imagine the reverb and harmonics! > I've been in that (now closed) station a couple times. Well, OK. But = even better would be either of two stations on the #1/#9 Broadway line on the upper west side: 168th or (I think) 181st St. Considerably larger, and much deeper below the surface. Gigantic. Similar in size and = configuration to a blimp or dirigible hangar, if you've ever been in one of those!   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: What is mean tempered tuning? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 14:01:08 -0400   On 9/8/03 11:32 AM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote:   > Martin Pasi came to finish an organ for a well known German builder in a > church here in the USA and decided to stay and open his own shop in Roy, > Washington. I met him during the 2000 AGO convention, a tall mild mannere= d > gentleman. I would consider him a genius. >=20 > =80=80=80I think you must be very right, Ron. My vague recollection is that Ma= rtin > first went to work for Paul Fritts for a while, but then opened his own s= hop a > dozen miles south, in Roy. I went to college half-way between Fritts=B9 > operation and Martin=B9s. (But LONG before either was in business.) I kne= w > Paul when he was a toddler; his dad was my organ teacher. My kid brother= is > well acquainted with Martin. >=20 > Alan >=20 >=20 > =20      
(back) Subject: Re: Bach underground From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 13:15:34 -0500   This sounds great. In fact, if Virgil Fox were alive today, he might start a concert tour called 'Bach Underground' or 'The Underground Bach'.   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 13:44:52 -0400 Subject: Re: Bach underground   > On 9/8/03 10:37 AM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> > wrote: > > > I've always fantasized about a pipe organ in the unused City Hall > station > > of the IRT # 1 in lower Manhattan. Imagine the reverb and harmonics! > > > I've been in that (now closed) station a couple times. Well, OK. But > even > better would be either of two stations on the #1/#9 Broadway line on > the > upper west side: 168th or (I think) 181st St. Considerably larger, > and > much deeper below the surface. Gigantic. Similar in size and > configuration > to a blimp or dirigible hangar, if you've ever been in one of those! > > Alan > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Bach underground From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 14:47:55 -0400   On 9/8/03 2:15 PM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > This sounds great. In fact, if Virgil Fox were alive today, he might > start a concert tour called 'Bach Underground' or 'The Underground = Bach'. > An interesting logistical consideration is how to get the beast DOWN = there. Even if were only the Allen Renaissance now in use at St. John the Divine, = I don't think there's a way to do it except to use a forklift to load it = onto a rail car (one of their "work" trains") at the car-yards and then bring = it in horizontally rather than vertically. Would not be difficult at all; = the flatcar, stopped on the express track, would serve as a stage. Imagine playing it while traveling through the tunnels? Fun!   At LEAST somebody should bring in that Dutch fairground organ!   Alan