PipeChat Digest #3951 - Wednesday, September 10, 2003
 
RE: Exploding pneumatics
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Exploding pneumatics
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Organ transplants
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Calliope
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Pipe Organs afloat
  by "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net>
Re: Trinity's new organ
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
RE: Pilar Cabrera & Bruges Cathedral
  by "Lefevre Vincent" <vincent.lefevre@tiscali.be>
Re: Christ Church, NYC Plus looking for organ practice time.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Two Pneumatic Instruments, Actions Retained
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
RE: Pilar Cabrera & Bruges Cathedral (Mea Culpa)
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Trinity's new organ
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Trinity Temp Organ (xposted)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Christ Church, NYC Plus looking for organ practice time.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Bellevue and Tacoma, WA. Recital Announcement
  by <Hell-Felix@t-online.de>
New organ stop?
  by "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Re: New organ stop?
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: New organ stop?
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: New organ stop?
  by "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net>
Re: New organ stop?
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Bellevue and Tacoma, WA. Recital Announcement
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: New organ stop?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: New organ stop?
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Exploding pneumatics From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 23:19:23 +0800   My son has just finished restoring the tubular pneumatic action on a 1912 J.E.Dodd and Son organ which was brought across from South Australia for a Catholic Church in the capital City of Western Australia. The organ had the reputation of being a little slow in response. The lead tubing was wrecked when the organ was dismantled in the other state and new tubing had to be purchased. It was of bigger bore than the original. The result is very good indeed. The action is fast and the organ sounds extremely good - big sound in a lively acoustic.   That pneumatic communication system was used in some of the Perth depratment stores in the 1930s. others had a wire on which the container ran. A thick elastic band set up like a boys catapult shot the container along the wire to the central cashier who returned it with the change and receipt. Could this be called a "tracker" system... Sorry! Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk >Hello, >I suppose we specialised in pneumatic actions here in >the UK, and brought them to a high degree of >perfection and reliability. > >Pneumatic actions vary so MUCH from one type to >another. Some are depressingly slow to respond, but >may have good repetition. Others are like lightning, >but don't repeat quickly. A few....a very few....are >beautiful to the touch and perfectly adequate in speed >and repetition. > > >Pneumatics are a fascinating area for study, and I >even have a very technical book on the subject. I >guess that the development of pneumatics was not >unconnected with early Victorian machinery in the >industrial era in the UK, and pneumatics were used >extensively in the woollen industry and elsewhere. >Whole carpets were made using pneumatic operating >systems. They even had a wonderful pneumatic cash >dispensing system in a local store, which enabled >money to be sent to various parts of the shop from a >central cash office. They put the money in a small >cylinder, fed it into a tube and....whoosh! > >>    
(back) Subject: RE: Exploding pneumatics From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 23:19:25 +0800   My son has just finished restoring the tubular pneumatic action on a 1912 J.E.Dodd and Son organ which was brought across from South Australia for a Catholic Church in the capital City of Western Australia. The organ had the reputation of being a little slow in response. The lead tubing was wrecked when the organ was dismantled in the other state and new tubing had to be purchased. It was of bigger bore than the original. The result is very good indeed. The action is fast and the organ sounds extremely good - big sound in a lively acoustic.   That pneumatic communication system was used in some of the Perth depratment stores in the 1930s. others had a wire on which the container ran. A thick elastic band set up like a boys catapult shot the container along the wire to the central cashier who returned it with the change and receipt. Could this be called a "tracker" system... Sorry! Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk >Hello, >I suppose we specialised in pneumatic actions here in >the UK, and brought them to a high degree of >perfection and reliability. > >Pneumatic actions vary so MUCH from one type to >another. Some are depressingly slow to respond, but >may have good repetition. Others are like lightning, >but don't repeat quickly. A few....a very few....are >beautiful to the touch and perfectly adequate in speed >and repetition. > > >Pneumatics are a fascinating area for study, and I >even have a very technical book on the subject. I >guess that the development of pneumatics was not >unconnected with early Victorian machinery in the >industrial era in the UK, and pneumatics were used >extensively in the woollen industry and elsewhere. >Whole carpets were made using pneumatic operating >systems. They even had a wonderful pneumatic cash >dispensing system in a local store, which enabled >money to be sent to various parts of the shop from a >central cash office. They put the money in a small >cylinder, fed it into a tube and....whoosh! > >>    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ transplants From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 11:30:29 -0400   Which reminds me - is this too much to say? - probably not - of a dentist friend of mine in Canada who had his sign out front saying "Periodontist." = I was there just for a routine cleaning, when a lady walked in saying: "You have got to see me. I am having my period." Please forgive if this = offends. It's too funny to keep to myself.   Cheers,   Malcolm   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2003 4:16 PM Subject: Re: Organ transplants     > Hello, > > I get offers of kidney and liver transplants!! > > First there was the cat, and then there was the > violinist. > > Poor cat! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > --- Andr=E9s G=FCnther <agunther@cantv.net> wrote: > > > I tapped in "Organos"- and out came a > > huge list of organ > > trasplanting institutes, associations, hospitals, > > surgeons and 'organ > > banks'....... *Yuk* > > ......still was an internet dummie <G>. >      
(back) Subject: Calliope From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 10:31:53 -0500   When Joshua Stoddard invented the calliope back in 1855 or so (I forget), his original intent was that the pipes be placed in church belfries to call worshippers to church. Nothing like "A Mighty Fortress" or "In the Garden" belted out on a calliope.   Don't forget that steam boilers were (and still are) in common commercial use for heat, so many churches presumably had live steam available--at least in the heating season. Maybe in the summer, they'd put a Moravian trombone choir in the belfry!!!   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organs afloat From: "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 10:42:37 -0500     The only intonation problem might be that the organ could be hopelessly = lost at C.           ----- Original Message -----=20 From: ameagher@stny.rr.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, September 08, 2003 11:56 PM Subject: RE: Pipe Organs afloat     Wow Bob,     I would think that would be imposibel to keep intune while the yacht = is on the water!   Andrew    
(back) Subject: Re: Trinity's new organ From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 11:42:36 EDT   While I was in NYC last week, I saw the temporary organ being installed. = I got to look at the console, which I understand was made by Ruffatti for Marshall-Ogletree Assoc., since they are the northeastern reps for = Ruffatti. It was explained to me by my Ruffatti rep that the "Epiphany" technology Marshall-Ogletree has developed isn't digital sampling, it's something = more state of the art, so I'm assuming that it's along the lines of what Musicom does with = real time digital tone production. I'm anxious to hear it and see what it's = like. Sounds like a good excuse for another trip to NYC.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: RE: Pilar Cabrera & Bruges Cathedral From: "Lefevre Vincent" <vincent.lefevre@tiscali.be> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 17:52:11 +0200   Dear Jon,   Gerhard Grenzing built an new organ for the BRUSSELS cathedral Sint = Goedele, which also has been played by Pilar Cabrera. Her concert is available on internet. She mainly played works of Spanish composers. Ignace Michiels = is indeed the house organist of the San Salvador Cathedral in Bruges. If you need further information, please do not hesitate to ask for it.   Vincent   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = jch Sent: woensdag 10 september 2003 16:31 To: PipeChat   Hopefully Vincent can clear this matter up for us. The Pilar Cabrera=20 webpage clearly indicates that the concert was at Bruges Cathedral=20 celebrating "50 Years Bruges Cathedral Concerts 2003. Theme of the year: =   "Four Centuries West European Organ Music". I know from research I did=20 last year that Gerhard Grenzing of Bacelona was building a new organ for =   the cathedral. I do not know if the installation has been completed.=20 Organist as cathedral is noted to be Ignace Michiels.   Jon Habermaas   =20   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Christ Church, NYC Plus looking for organ practice time. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:11:11 -0400   On 9/10/03 2:43 AM, "RonSeverin@aol.com" <RonSeverin@aol.com> wrote:   > As for an organist, there was a fellow today that has been looking > for a year, a place to practice in NYC. He was willing to pay for > practice time, perhaps he would accept a small salery to help this > little congregation out. He wrote to the lists twice today. >=20 I=B9m perplexed that I=B9ve not seen such a post, and I read =8Cem all. Can anyone put me in touch with this person, or him in touch with me?   Alan Freed 1 718 884 1893 fax or phone acfreed0904@earthlink.net    
(back) Subject: Two Pneumatic Instruments, Actions Retained From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:10:42 -0400   Dear List and Colin,   Two great instruments that I know personally were restored in recent years with their pneumatic actions restored as well. One is the 1907 J. W. = Walcker in Bristol Cathedral, restored by Mander in 1989-90. http://www.bristol-cathedral.co.uk/Organ.htm You can, at a click, go to = the stoplist. I accompanied Evensong on this Organ once for a visiting = American choir, and the touch and feel of the action was really splendid. I believe the decision to restore the action was partlly a matter of preserving this aspect of the instrument, and also reflected the fact that those using it were satisfied with its performance.   And then, there is the 1885 Hill Organ in Eton College Chapel. Promise you will click on the URL given here, if for no other reason, than to feast on the amazing appearance of this instrument. Hill rebuilt the Organ in 1902, and the Manderins did a restoration in 1987 http://www.mander-organs.com/html/eton_college_chapel.html There is a wonderful bit in the narrative, which is taken from the Mander Website, mentioning the 5 miles of new tubing required for the action. The history and stoplist of this instrument are given at this site.   Does not the enormous Hill Organ in Sydney Town Hall retain its Pneumatic Action?   Yours sincerely, huffing and puffing,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com       > Hello, > > I suppose we specialised in pneumatic actions here in > the UK, and brought them to a high degree of > perfection and reliability. > > Pneumatic actions vary so MUCH from one type to > another. Some are depressingly slow to respond, but > may have good repetition. Others are like lightning, > but don't repeat quickly. A few....a very few....are > beautiful to the touch and perfectly adequate in speed > and repetition. > > The arguments concerning exhaust pneumatic and charge > pneumatic raged for years, and some very fine builders > were involved in one or other of the categories. > I "think" I am right in saying that Norman & Beard > developed a super-fast exhaust system, and Harrison & > Harrison did likewise. It is a tribute to Harrison's > quality of work, that some of these old actions still > work witheir original leather intact, but > re-leathering is a nightmare due to the complexity of > the exhaust action, and there are not many capable > pneumatic specialists still alive. > > The quickest pneumatic I ever heard was on a Mortier > dance band organ......just WOW! > > For utter reliability and acceptable speed, the Binns > pneumatic actions took some beating. They even > developed an extremely clever pneumatic combination > mechanism which enabled variable stop combinations > actuated by combination pedals....well worth a look > at. > In fact, the old Binns action of the famous Schulze > organ at St.Bartholemew's church Armley, close to > where I live in Yorkshire, finally expired after > something like a century. The pneumatic action is to > be re-made EXACTLY AS IT WAS. > > I think I was the last person every to play a recital > there using the old action of the Echo organ.....I > think the Reger must have killed it off, because it > never worked again after that!! > > Pneumatics are a fascinating area for study, and I > even have a very technical book on the subject. I > guess that the development of pneumatics was not > unconnected with early Victorian machinery in the > industrial era in the UK, and pneumatics were used > extensively in the woollen industry and elsewhere. > Whole carpets were made using pneumatic operating > systems. They even had a wonderful pneumatic cash > dispensing system in a local store, which enabled > money to be sent to various parts of the shop from a > central cash office. They put the money in a small > cylinder, fed it into a tube and....whoosh! > > I even had a car once which had an "organ type" > accelerator, operated by vacuum, and that was from > 1965! > > I learned the next bit from Stephen Bicknell, who very > kindly wrote to me personally to explain the error of > my ways. Apparently pipe-speech can be badly affected > by pneumatic actions, due to the "explosive" opening > of the windchest pneumatic motors, where air pressure > ensures that there is a very high level of immediately > available "torque" when the motor is exhausted. The > pallet collapses with quite a bang and this can > unsettle pipe-speech dramatically. This is a big > problem when organs were originally voiced for tracker > or barker-lever. It is a source of considerable > trouble for the restorers of the mid-19th century > Schulze organ at St.Bart's, Armley, here in the UK, > which Binns had converted to pneumatic action around > the turn of the century. Voiced on very modest wind > pressures, with low cut-ups and open foot voicing, the > explosive collapse of the chest motors causes some > hesitation in the speech of the pipes, and in > particular, the 8ft Principal pipes. So, in order to > get around the problem, the speech is normally re-set > a little slower. However, THAT was not an option for > Binns apparently, and it looks as if he just bolted on > the action and mercifully left the voicing as Schulze > intended it. > > Last but not least is the "touch", which is always > better with charge pneumatic systems.....nice and > crisp with a bit of top resistance to the keys. With > an exhaust sytem, the feel is very springy > because......that's all that keeps the keys up. Of > course, builders such as Harrison & Harrison, although > dedicated to the exhaust penumatic system, went to > great lengths to ensure a nice feel to the keys, and > they certainly succeeded. > > So if Nate has any specific questions, the book I have > may provide the answer. If not, I may know a few > people who actually know all the answers and who spent > a lifetime with a candle in one hand and a stick of > chatterton's compound in the other, as they sealed the > lead tubing on a regular basis. > > Nate might also consider the work of band organ > restorers in the USA, because apart from the key-frame > system, the action is quite normal after that, so far > as I am aware. They would therefore be a source of > considerable knowledge. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK >      
(back) Subject: RE: Pilar Cabrera & Bruges Cathedral (Mea Culpa) From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 11:13:46 -0500   Somehow I confused Bruges with Brussels...thanks for clearing up my error.   Jon   At 05:52 PM 9/10/03 +0200, you wrote:   >Dear Jon, > >Gerhard Grenzing built an new organ for the BRUSSELS cathedral Sint = Goedele, >which also has been played by Pilar Cabrera. Her concert is available on >internet. She mainly played works of Spanish composers. Ignace Michiels = is >indeed the house organist of the San Salvador Cathedral in Bruges. >If you need further information, please do not hesitate to ask for it. > >Vincent    
(back) Subject: Re: Trinity's new organ From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:18:20 -0400   At 11:42 AM 2003-09-10 -0400, you wrote: >While I was in NYC last week, I saw the temporary organ being >installed. I got to look at the console, which I understand was made by >Ruffatti for Marshall-Ogletree Assoc., since they are the northeastern >reps for Ruffatti. It was explained to me by my Ruffatti rep that the >"Epiphany" technology Marshall-Ogletree has developed isn't digital >sampling, it's something more state of the art, so I'm assuming that it's =   >along the lines of what Musicom does with real time digital tone >production. I'm anxious to hear it and see what it's like. Sounds like = a >good excuse for another trip to NYC. > >Monty Bennett   Monty,   The article talks about sampling pipes, and playing it back including wheezes,creaks and all. Sounds like sampling technology to me. There may =   be some proprietary elements to this technology, but from the article it sounds very much like sampling as opposed to synthesis technology like = what Musicom does. There may be some physical modelling involved. The article =   talks about a sample for each note of every rank, and my guess is they are =   very long samples.   In any case, it sounds like an attempt to do things right in terms of copying a pipe organ tone and ensemble, and as such it should be applauded. Whether it succeeds in convincing the sceptics is something else. Whether this kind of thing fits in the marketplace is also = something else. My guess is that there would be very, very few takers at this = price.   Arie V.   P.S. You have to remember that Marshall-Ogletree or anybody close to the situation, is not going to give you the straight goods on this system, = till it becomes either patented or commercially available. Just good business practise.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263  
(back) Subject: Re: Trinity Temp Organ (xposted) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:18:05 -0400   On 9/10/03 10:46 AM, "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > We need more information. All eyes open, every ear tuned. > Richard, I'd love to be informed enough to offer even a snatch of an intelligent response. Way beyond me. With you, I'll keep eyes open too, hoping that others will pin down some answers.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Christ Church, NYC Plus looking for organ practice time. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:25:30 -0400   On 9/10/03 12:11 PM, "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:   > I=B9m perplexed that I=B9ve not seen such a post, and I read =8Cem all. Can an= yone > put me in touch with this person, or him in touch with me?   Cancel that. Ron just gave me the guy=B9s e-mail, and I=B9ve dropped him a note. We=B9ll get that worked out. The practice place/time is EASY.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Bellevue and Tacoma, WA. Recital Announcement From: <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 18:29:28 +0200 (CEST)   Dear listmembers and friends,   I have been asked to publish the programs of my recitals on Friday, Sep. 12, in Bellevue/WA, and on Sunday, Sep. 14, in Tacoma/WA.   Here are the programs:   BELLEVUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Bellevue/WA Friday, September 12, 2004   Johann Sebastian Bach - Prelude and Fuge Eflat Major, BWV 52 - Trio Sonata No. 1 Eflat Major, BWV 525 - Prelude and Fugue D Major, BWV 532   Felix Mendelssohn Sonata No. 4 B Major, op. 65   Franz Liszt - Consolation Dflat Major - Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H   INTERMISSION   Marcel Dupre Prelude and Fugue B Major, op. 7   Felix Alexandre Guilmant Sonata No. 1 D Minor     PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY Tacoma/WA Sunday, September 14, 2004   Johann Sebastian Bach   - Prelude G Major, BWV 568 - "Ich ruf zu dir Herr Jesu Christ", BWV 639 - Fantasy and Fugue G Minor, BWV 542 - "Schmuecke dich o liebe Seele" (Leipzig Chorale), BWV 654 - Trio Sonata No. 5, C Major, BWV 529 - Prelude and Fugue D Major, BWV 532   INTERMISSION   Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809 - 1847) Sonata No. 1 F Minor, op. 65   Enjott Schneider (*1950) Toccata "Schlafes Bruder" (1994)   Felix Mendelssohn Sonata No. 6, op. 65 ("Vater Unser im Himmelreich")   Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Fantasy F Minor, KV 608   Details about directions, tickets, times, etc you will find on the website of the Pipe Organ Foundation: www-pipeorganfoundation.com   Would be great to see many of you.   Cheers,   Felix Hell B.M. Candidate The Curtis Institute of Music  
(back) Subject: New organ stop? From: "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 09:23:18 -0700   You saw it here first, folks. Be the first on your block to have a Black Hole division on your next pipe organ:   http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/09/10/blackhole.music.reut/index.html    
(back) Subject: Re: New organ stop? From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:23:46 -0500     At 57 octives below Middle C that would be a: 115,418,387,584,000' Black Hole Stop (give or take a few feet)!   Now, there'll be plenty of room for that 64' Bumblebee and all his friends, to fit through the shallots!   David E   David Evangelides Colorado Springs, Colorado     -----Original Message----- From: Eric McKirdy <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 09:23:18 -0700 Subject: New organ stop?   > You saw it here first, folks. Be the first on your block to have a > Black > Hole division on your next pipe organ: > > http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/09/10/blackhole.music.reut/index.htm > l > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: New organ stop? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:34:25 -0400   the article says "the sound waves are emanating from the perseus cluster." = if space is a vacuum (no air), how can sound waves travel through it?  
(back) Subject: Re: New organ stop? From: "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 12:48:42 -0500     Hmmm... That's only about 46 octaves below middle C, assuming that middle C is = produced by a 2' pipe speaking at around 261 Hz. I came up with a much = longer pipe than you.   What length did you use for middle C?   Just curious; not planning to build it or anything--I'll leave that to = Disney.       ----- Original Message -----=20 From: David Evangelides=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2003 12:23 PM Subject: Re: New organ stop?       At 57 octives below Middle C that would be a: 115,418,387,584,000' Black Hole Stop (give or take a few feet)!      
(back) Subject: Re: New organ stop? From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:56:39 -0400   At 12:23 PM 2003-09-10 -0500, you wrote:   >At 57 octives below Middle C that would be a: > 115,418,387,584,000' Black Hole Stop (give or take a few feet)! > >Now, there'll be plenty of room for that 64' Bumblebee and all his >friends, to fit through the shallots! > >David E > >David Evangelides >Colorado Springs, Colorado   Hi,   Any pipe organ builders willing to take the challenge? Or maybe in this case they wouldn't mind having this as a digital extension. In any case, I don't want it on my instrument, if and when it gets built.   Funny, or puzzling at least, we seem to find out a lot of useless this about the universe, but we can't find out how solve global poverty, starvation, get the peace in Iraq, or the middle east etc. Sometimes I think we have priorities in the wrong places.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263      
(back) Subject: Re: Bellevue and Tacoma, WA. Recital Announcement From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 14:24:38 -0400   On 9/10/03 12:29 PM, "Hell-Felix@t-online.de" <Hell-Felix@t-online.de> wrote:   > PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY > Tacoma/WA > Sunday, September 14, 2004   Felix, I can't remember for sure, but isn't that your BIRTHDAY? They'd better have a big cake for you.   I've alerted all my nieces and nephews (who live in that area) to the schedule; hope they'll have the pleasure of hearing and meeting you.   Alan Freed St. Luke's, Manhattan    
(back) Subject: Re: New organ stop? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 14:43:23 -0400   On 9/10/03 1:48 PM, "Bill" <bill.hauser@cox.net> wrote:   > That's only about 46 octaves below middle C, assuming that middle C is > produced by a 2' pipe speaking at around 261 Hz. I came up with a much = longer > pipe than you. > > What length did you use for middle C? > I thought it was a B-flat. See the article. I suppose the one just below middle-C.   Alan (mean-tone?)      
(back) Subject: Re: New organ stop? From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:48:38 -0500   Hi, Arie: You wrote: > Funny, or puzzling at least, we seem to find out a lot > of useless this about the universe, but we can't find > out how solve global poverty, starvation, get the peace > in Iraq, or the middle east etc. Sometimes I think we > have priorities in the wrong places. ....or we are too distracted, too unconcerned, or too ignorant to want to be concerned with "real" priorities. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..