PipeChat Digest #3974 - Monday, September 15, 2003
 
Re: Geneology
  by "MARAUDER" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
used organs, p.s.
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #3973 - 09/15/03
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
rECORDINGS OF ELECTRONICS
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Serious musicians and electronic devices
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
RE: Train whistles - & sirens
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Serious musicians and electronic devices
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Bach Recordings
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
RE: SOUND, *not* SIZE
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
For AIO conventioneers only (X posted)
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net>
Re: Hammond organs.....real or Memorex?????
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Pure Hammond - Mischief
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com>
Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890)
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890)
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890)
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: the vet's fees
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Smm Organs--Artiste
  by "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
Re: The AGO's Function-long
  by "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
Re: Small organs
  by "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Geneology From: "MARAUDER" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 14:17:05 -0400   Related to this:   Descendants of Mendelssohn ran the Afka firm in Germany which makes camera film.   One of Mendelssohn's descendants came to America and taught at , if I recall correctly, Bryn Mawr College.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   From: Kzimmer0817@aol.com Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2003 22:51:03 EDT To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Geneology     List,   Just had a curious tho't. Are there those around now - and there should = be - who are the direct great+ grandchildren of J.S. Bach or Mozart, or the other great masters. If so, who are these people? Have they made contributions to the world of music either in composition or performance?   Keith        
(back) Subject: used organs, p.s. From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 11:24:50 -0700   SOME of that I learned by DOING; MOST of it I learned by reading the journal of the Organ Historical Society.   If you're not a member, you SHOULD be (grin).   http://www.organsociety.org/   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #3973 - 09/15/03 From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 14:55:56 -0400   Or just get a job at a Unitarian church. ;-)   ducking low, WG   Arie wrote: >Hi, .... >If you are an agnostic, atheist, or non-religious, maybe should setup = some   >kind of organization, club or whatever, and do whatever pleases you, and do >it to the glory of yourselves. > >Just my thoughts............ > >Arie V. http://www.nauticom.net  
(back) Subject: rECORDINGS OF ELECTRONICS From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 13:51:52 -0500   Uhh, didn't Virgil Fox record on the famous Rodgers Touring Black Beauty? =     Yes, that's several generations removed from state of the art.   Dennis Steckley & A Six-Pack of Cats    
(back) Subject: Re: Serious musicians and electronic devices From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:12:41 -0400   I don't know, Dale. I was not there. When machines, whether they have chips or pipes, are trucked down the highway from trade show to convention to recital venue bad things can happen. If a speaker cone, cable, or = power amp gets blown due to rough handling, it is easy to fix, and will remain fixed for a long, long time if left alone to do its job. Look at the history of the few touring pipe organs that ever existed, and reflect on the Hurculean efforts expended to keep them working.   At the Region III convention this year, when Naji played his recital on a very prestigous pipe organ, there were numerous ciphers during the performance. Many of us know how easy it is to fix the average cipher, = and how long they usually stay fixed. Not very.   -WG   ><Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote: > >walterg@nauticom.net writes: > >> the Allen CC is a fabulous and worthy instrument. > >didn't it pop and crack at the Seattle Convention? > >dale in florida http://www.nauticom.net  
(back) Subject: RE: Train whistles - & sirens From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:12:07 -0400   This is slightly off-topic, but the co-incidence of seeing this subject = is impossible to resist:   I caught on the radio this morning a discussion with Mr. Hershey Felder, = an actor, playwright, composer and concert pianist who spent several = years with Gershwin family members, biographers and friends poring over = correspondence, original manuscripts, and personal belongings. The = one-man show "George Gershwin Alone" is playing in Philadelphia. From = all reports, it is well worth attending.   Mr. Felder tells of a conversation with a Jewish refugee or = concentration camp survivor from World War II who pronounced Gershwin a = prophet in Rhapsody in Blue because the fate of the Jews in Europe was = in that music. "Listen to the train whistles and the trains moving, = it's all in there!" He replied that this was impossible: Gershwin = composed Rhapsody in Blue in 1924, before anyone in America had even = heard of Hitler. But later he came upon a letter or memo from Gershwin = himself in which the composer explained that the opening clarinet solo = evoked a train whistle, and one of the motives was inspired by the = click-clack of wheels of a moving train, a fact that few people might = realize. So, although this listener's idea that Gershwin was prophetic = might still be fanciful, his experience did give him some special = insight into the music that turned out to be more than a subjective = impression.    
(back) Subject: Re: Serious musicians and electronic devices From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:19:00 EDT   Hi Walter:   Now that you mention touring organs, I wonder what happened to the portable seven rank Wicks that Roger Wagner toured with? It must have been during the 60's. He had conections at the old Morris Premann building in LA to store it on an upper floor. I saw and played it there.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Recordings From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:26:58 -0400   My favorite Bach recordings are by Harald Vogel, I think. He also has a great CD of Bach's music played on the pedal clavichord. Both CD's are very good performances.   ....Just my opinion though :) Shelley      
(back) Subject: RE: SOUND, *not* SIZE From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:28:33 -0400   Jeff White wrote:   > why would I want just three ranks per division on a > affordable pipe organ when I could have 75 "ranks" on an electronic = for > the same price (in THEORY)?   After unintentionally kicking off this discussion, I've stayed out of it = because I'm unwilling either to defend my original statement or = expressly repudiate it. It does seem to me that an electronic organ as = large as that is a vulgarity and its admirers are living in fantasyland. = The resulting sound does not have the complexity or richness of 75 = ranks of pipes. I have never had regular access to an organ as large as = that. My undergraduate and graduate recitals, eclectic programs both, = were played on instruments of about 60 ranks.   But if your statement of comparative costs is correct, then there are = churches that cannot afford even three ranks per division, just as there = were churches that could not afford them 100 years ago and made do with = a harmonium. Where I play, for instance. They put in a two-manual = Allen Renaissance a few years ago, along with a few other capital = improvements, and are still struggling to pay off the debt.      
(back) Subject: For AIO conventioneers only (X posted) From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:04:52 -0400   Andres Gunther agun@telcel.net.ve agunther@cantv.net   IF YOU WON'T ATTEND THE AIO CONVENTION IN ATLANTA 2003 YOU MAY DELETE = THIS.   Right now I am doing my preparatives to attend the AIO convention in = Atlanta next October. It will be the first time in my life that I attend such an event, and the first time in years that I will face foreign organists, organ builders and technicians personally.   A time ago I posted the organ history of my country in Piporg-List. This material is available as a private print. Any convention goer who would be interested in getting an exemplar for free please let me know as soon as possible because I must know how many prints it will become necessary to make.   Can anybody inform me if there is a Barnes & Noble and a Kinko's or = similar copy-bookbinding center within Reasonable distance from the Sheraton = Colony Square Hotel?- I say *reasonable distance* because I cannot rent a car; venezuelan credit cards are blocked by our government.   For the same reason and because 6 full-sheduled days are a short time I = must plan carefully my purchases in advance. I have a booklist about matters I = am interested to learn. If these books can be purchased at the convention = this will be fine, but if not, I will need some help to get them in time. = Please note that this is less a money than a logistic problem.   This will be a unique opportunity to meet you, and I would be glad to join the AIO and the OHS if I qualify. The only way to get a proper image will be with a personal meeting of course. Anyway I would be glad to make a previous private contact with somebody who feels that he = (or she) can help me in some of this. Feel free to forward this to people who are not in the List but will be at the convention.   Looking forward to put faces behind names soon I remain yours Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.                    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond organs.....real or Memorex????? From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:59:59 -0400   At 12:48 PM 2003-09-15 -0400, you wrote: >In a message dated 9/15/2003 11:27:25 AM Eastern Daylight Time, >ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com writes: > >>The same fellow told me, it is because, a number of B-3s (original), are =   >>starting to bite the dust, and there are not enough really good ones >>around anymore to satisfy demand. I don't think Hammond is selling very =   >>many Hammond-Content, the classical > > >because they wrecked all the old ones they can find and dont support >anything else. Yamaha does this as well as Roland on keyboards and older =   >home organs. > >as to the content organs, people who want Hammonds want Hammonds and not >pretend Digital classics....... > >having played em----- > >dale in Florida   Dale,   I agree with your assertion, that Hammond will never sell many classically =   styled organs, no matter how good or bad they are. The Hammond name just is not associated with classical organs. Baldwin tried it with the Wurlitzer name, and it didn't work.   I understand that tone wheel organs have not been produced now in over 30 years. That means that many of them are over 40 years old. I also understand that Hammond ran out of service parts on these organs at least 10 years ago. That means dead organs are now supplying parts to keep others going. I suppose you could say that Hammond should keep on supplying parts, but I am told that the cost of doing that is prohibitive.   As for Yamaha, Roland keyboards, Technics organs etc., a lot of these companies do not support their products beyond the 7 years demanded by law. I guess that is price of buying cheap commoditized products. Low price equals short support life.   Arie V.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Arie Vandenberg Classic Organbuilders ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com Tel.: 905-475-1263  
(back) Subject: Re: Pure Hammond - Mischief From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@msn.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 15:10:04 -0500   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890) From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:09:17 EDT   Ladies and Gentlemen: To clarify the fate of Roosevelt opus 408 (with one rank originally = built for Opus 400 [The Chicago Auditorium Theatre]), I stopped discussing it = on the chatlists because so many people were enraged, called it junk, and = used it as a springboard to aver that nobody wanted it because electronics were superior. I was sickened and profoundly disappointed, so I dropped the = subject. That may be why Bud assumed that it had perished. It is truly not "saved" yet; it simply has been granted a stay of execution. Among the many emails I received was from the president of an organ company who said, "If it's so important to you, why don't YOU buy it?" = With no interest in historic preservation, they were obviously fed up with hearing = about it. So I DID buy it. It was appalling that I was forced to purchase it, even though the = church authorities were ALSO willing to let it go down with the building. "Buy it = or we'll destroy it" doesn't seem very spiritual to me. The pipework is exceptional, and is now safely in wooden crates and padded cartons. Basic scale measurements were taken during the removal = process, and pipemakers' marks and signatures were noted. The unmitered 16' Trombone = with wooden shallots, as well as the gargantuan Open Wood Diapason are all in = the same rented warehouse, for which I continue to pay. I am still stunned by = how my staff managed to do this, amidst acres of pigeon droppings, with no = running water, no electricity, no light, and blazing summer heat. Overtime on top = of NYC wages can be calculated, but that kind of understanding of the = significance of this instrument, and the gripping desire to save it, are things that I could not have purchased no matter how much I laid out. The organ is still available, but I was so stunned by the bitterness = and dismissiveness of people over this gem, that I have not attempted any = public offerings since then. Obviously, if it is not afforded a new home soon, I cannot continue to pour money into it, and will be forced to dispense with = it. I am sending photographs to a list member who I know is a fine, preservation-conscious organbuilder, but even with a serious client's ear, = such projects can move at a glacial pace. Keith Bigger, who tends to the Steere in the Baptist Temple in = Brooklyn, is the one who called my attention to this organ and its impending doom. = He put me in touch with the right people, and it was his insistent call to = "do the right thing" that got me over there to SEE it, rather than just saying, = "yeah, yeah." He even tried to find free or inexpensive storage space for it, putting us in touch with "people who knew people," but alas, when those = options ran into obstacles, we went with storage that was secure, insured, and = accessible, despite the cost. Keith also drove by the church several times per week to =   make sure that it still had a roof, was unburned, and was not being = slammed by a wrecking ball before I had the faith to do my part. Organs get saved and restored in a variety of ways. With $87,000,000,000.00 required for future bombs and battleships, the = government is not going to be granting funds for preserving our artistic heritage. Individuals, = working together, can do more than advocacy organizations, if they devote their = energy to constructive and nurturing projects, rather than to petty rumor, = positioning for power, or the quest for the quick, new, and average. For those on this list who are in the planning stages of a pipe organ project, or know of anybody who might be interested in saving this organ, = please let me know. As you may have surmised, I have no interest in making money = on this, otherwise, I would have sold it piecemeal from the church steps and washed my hands of the affair. I care little if my firm rebuilds it, or = another competent craftsman is selected, as long as this instrument is not = butchered, and is treated as the work of art it has been for the last 114 years.   With thanks, Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890) From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:25:55 -0400   Dear Seb, Do you have any pictures of the organ before it was dismantled? Paul ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 15, 2003 4:09 PM Subject: Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890)     > Ladies and Gentlemen: > To clarify the fate of Roosevelt opus 408 (with one rank originally built > for Opus 400 [The Chicago Auditorium Theatre]), I stopped discussing it on > the chatlists because so many people were enraged, called it junk, and used it > as a springboard to aver that nobody wanted it because electronics were > superior. I was sickened and profoundly disappointed, so I dropped the subject. That > may be why Bud assumed that it had perished. > It is truly not "saved" yet; it simply has been granted a stay of > execution. > Among the many emails I received was from the president of an organ > company who said, "If it's so important to you, why don't YOU buy it?" With no > interest in historic preservation, they were obviously fed up with = hearing about > it. > So I DID buy it. > It was appalling that I was forced to purchase it, even though the church > authorities were ALSO willing to let it go down with the building. "Buy = it or > we'll destroy it" doesn't seem very spiritual to me. > The pipework is exceptional, and is now safely in wooden crates and > padded cartons. Basic scale measurements were taken during the removal process, and > pipemakers' marks and signatures were noted. The unmitered 16' Trombone with > wooden shallots, as well as the gargantuan Open Wood Diapason are all in the > same rented warehouse, for which I continue to pay. I am still stunned = by how > my staff managed to do this, amidst acres of pigeon droppings, with no running > water, no electricity, no light, and blazing summer heat. Overtime on = top of > NYC wages can be calculated, but that kind of understanding of the significance > of this instrument, and the gripping desire to save it, are things that = I > could not have purchased no matter how much I laid out. > The organ is still available, but I was so stunned by the bitterness and > dismissiveness of people over this gem, that I have not attempted any public > offerings since then. Obviously, if it is not afforded a new home soon, = I > cannot continue to pour money into it, and will be forced to dispense = with it. I am > sending photographs to a list member who I know is a fine, > preservation-conscious organbuilder, but even with a serious client's = ear, such projects can > move at a glacial pace. > Keith Bigger, who tends to the Steere in the Baptist Temple in Brooklyn, > is the one who called my attention to this organ and its impending doom. He > put me in touch with the right people, and it was his insistent call to "do the > right thing" that got me over there to SEE it, rather than just saying, "yeah, > yeah." He even tried to find free or inexpensive storage space for it, > putting us in touch with "people who knew people," but alas, when those options ran > into obstacles, we went with storage that was secure, insured, and accessible, > despite the cost. Keith also drove by the church several times per week = to > make sure that it still had a roof, was unburned, and was not being slammed by a > wrecking ball before I had the faith to do my part. > Organs get saved and restored in a variety of ways. With > $87,000,000,000.00 required for future bombs and battleships, the government is not going to > be granting funds for preserving our artistic heritage. Individuals, working > together, can do more than advocacy organizations, if they devote their energy > to constructive and nurturing projects, rather than to petty rumor, positioning > for power, or the quest for the quick, new, and average. > For those on this list who are in the planning stages of a pipe = organ > project, or know of anybody who might be interested in saving this = organ, please > let me know. As you may have surmised, I have no interest in making = money on > this, otherwise, I would have sold it piecemeal from the church steps = and > washed my hands of the affair. I care little if my firm rebuilds it, or another > competent craftsman is selected, as long as this instrument is not butchered, > and is treated as the work of art it has been for the last 114 years. > > With thanks, > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Saving Roosevelt Opus 408 (1890) From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 13:31:17 -0700   YAY SEBASTIAN! (grin)   I'm SO glad to be wrong (for once)!   Cheers,   Bud   TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Ladies and Gentlemen: > To clarify the fate of Roosevelt opus 408 (with one rank originally = built > for Opus 400 [The Chicago Auditorium Theatre]), I stopped discussing it = on > the chatlists because so many people were enraged, called it junk, and = used it > as a springboard to aver that nobody wanted it because electronics were > superior. I was sickened and profoundly disappointed, so I dropped the = subject. That > may be why Bud assumed that it had perished. > It is truly not "saved" yet; it simply has been granted a stay of > execution. > Among the many emails I received was from the president of an organ > company who said, "If it's so important to you, why don't YOU buy it?" = With no > interest in historic preservation, they were obviously fed up with = hearing about > it. > So I DID buy it.        
(back) Subject: Re: the vet's fees From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 21:36:28 +0100 (BST)   Perhaps I should put this on orgofftop, as it is nothing to do with organs whatsoever, though I expect I could drag one in somehow. Anyway the list owners encourage humour. This guy's dog has passed on to the great kennel in the sky, but he won't accept its death, so he takes it along to the vet. The vet looks at it, shakes his head, and says there is not much he can do. "Please!" says the guy. "OK. Hang on. I'll give it one more test." He goes next door and brings in a box, which he opens, and out comes a cat. The cat walks over to the dog, sniffs it, shakes its head and goes back in the box. Sorry, says the vet. Ah well, how much do I owe you? $1,030 says the vet. HOW MUCH? HOW THE HELL DO YOU REACH THAT FIGURE? Well, my fee is $30 and it's $1,000 for the CatScan" John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topic of the week : A is for Arrogance   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: RE: Smm Organs--Artiste From: "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:37:01 -0400   Monty,   I don't believe I have heard Bill Hamner's voicing as the two Wicks organs=   I presided over that were poorly voiced were put in before he was hired=2E= I have heard good things about Bill and hope to hear his work someday=2E   Andrew   Original Message: ----------------- From: RMB10@aol=2Ecom Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 06:53:45 -0400 (EDT) To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Smm Organs--Artiste     >Subject: Re: Small Organs - Artiste >From: "ameagher@stny=2Err=2Ecom" <ameagher@stny=2Err=2Ecom> >Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 00:24:02 -0400 > >It doesn't work for Wicks because their voicing is shit=2E > >Andrew     Andrew- In the not so distant past days, the voicing wasn't necessarily the best, but=20 at my funeral home we have a 1939 Henry Vincent Willis voiced Wicks=2E Th= e new=20 Wicks organs being voiced by Bill Hamner are fantastic=2E He's one of the=   few=20 people voicing in America who knows how to make a true Diapason, not to=20=   mention all sorts of long forgotten stops from the Romantic era=2E His wo= rk would=20 make Henry Vincent Willis or G=2E Donald Harrison proud=2E   Monty Bennett     -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E      
(back) Subject: Re: The AGO's Function-long From: "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:40:10 -0400   Dale,   Just out of curiosity, what is your "real" job? It's a shame that churche= s won't pay organists enough so that they don't have to have another "real" job and have music be their "real" job=2E   Andrew =20   Original Message: ----------------- From: Keys4bach@aol=2Ecom Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 07:35:03 -0400 (EDT) To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: The AGO's Function-long     In a message dated 9/15/2003 12:17:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 ameagher@stny=2Err=2Ecom writes:   > They all made about $35,000 a year with > benefits=2E >=20   heckfire --my Lutheran maroon gets 50000 with health and retirement in a=20=   church of 120 members---and housing that comes out pre tax or some such thing to=20 help him out tax wise=2E   I get 67=2E00 a week if I show up and 75 a month toward health insurance=2E=   Music Director/organist=2E I get 30 if I record on disc the service the Sundays=20 I am away for my real job which is not the one I would prefer to be=20 doing=2E=2E=2E=2E=2E=2E=2E   not complaining just adding coals=2E   dale in Florida     -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E      
(back) Subject: Re: Small organs From: "ameagher@stny.rr.com" <ameagher@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:44:53 -0400   Dale,   Because it was my masters recital and it was all the school had and you have to demonstrate competence in the entire organ repertoire for a degree=   recital=2E I also played Bach and Mendelssohn which were of course a much=   better match for the instrument=2E   Andrew   Original Message: ----------------- From: Keys4bach@aol=2Ecom Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 07:38:00 -0400 (EDT) To: pipechat@pipechat=2Eorg Subject: Re: Small organs     In a message dated 9/15/2003 12:19:25 AM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 ameagher@stny=2Err=2Ecom writes:   > And I played Grande Piece Symphonique on a 24 rank Beckerath mechanical > stop action (without a registrant) tracker on my masters recital=2E All= it > takes is a little creativity   But why would you do this? When i gave a recital in the theater with a=20=   Casavant tracker hanging on the wall I played an entirely different progra= m than=20 the Belch and Vomit (sorry, Balcom and Vaughn) in the recital hall?   However, i bet it was a great performance and so carefully thought out it had=20 to work well=2E   dale in Florida     -------------------------------------------------------------------- mail2web - Check your email from the web at http://mail2web=2Ecom/ =2E