PipeChat Digest #4001 - Sunday, September 21, 2003
 
Re: Thank you, Monty & Malcolm
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Hugeness, Hugicity, Hugiosity, Hugiciousness
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Anthem Selection Tool (long)
  by "Thurletta Brown-Gavins" <TMBROWN@vance.net>
Re: Hugeness, Hugicity, Hugiosity, Hugiciousness
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RSVP
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: RSVP
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: OT, Humor - How many group posters does it take to change alight bulb
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net>
Re: Disney Hall organ
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Preaching/Lectionaries - request education here
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: Preaching/Lectionaries - request education here
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: RSVP
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Overture Hall, Madison, WI
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Thank you, Monty & Malcolm From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 06:06:20 EDT   >Our firm's policy is to give the client two specifications, one usually >being what I feel might be "ideal" for the music program and the room, = the >other being a slightly distilled version, from which are omitted what = some might >feel are luxuries. If and when we are selected, the specification is fine-tuned.   This is exactly how we went about the proposal. My situation was strange, =   the second time I have heard of it happening, although I know it has = happened before. We had no organ committee. We had no consultant. I had been the =   "permanent interim" for about 3 years at my church, doing some other fill = in work at a couple of other churches, but still being the main organist at the = church, albeit in an unofficial role. (In the midst of all our organ negotiations, =   the church made me the offer to become the permanent organist, so I = accepted, becoming official in September--the choir members all laughed when it was announced that I was going to be permanent--they said they all knew that = it would happen sooner or later) When the congregation gave the go ahead to = proceed on designs for the new church building, The Pastor told the Minister of Music = and myself to make a list of 5 builders to talk to. The Minister of Music = also talked to the other organist the two organsts hashed out a list of = builders. From there, the Minister of Music and myself talked to builders and went = to see instruments. We came back, gave our recommendation, and before long, we = had the contract in hand. I was asked by our rep to come up with a stoplist = in a couple of different forms.....1. my "dream" instrument, 2. a cut down = version, and 3. the "bare bones" version. He sent it to the builder, and from = there, the builder and I finalized and fine tuned the specification. What = impressed me about the builder is that he was very hesitant to give an average price =   quote to me, knowing that we were going to have some unique things, such = as a 32' in the facade, an Antiphonal organ with chamade, etc. Not until the = stoplist was finalized, did we see an exact figure of cost. Even after the = contract was signed, I got the bright idea to un-unify a few of the pedal stops. = (Which was my original design--I found out that we were going to have plenty of = room in the chambers, so it would be possible to have some more independent = ranks.) Our builder sent me a detailed list of what the cost breakdown would be. = I passed it along to the Pastor, who then gave his stamp of approval.   This is in complete contrast to a builder who is currently very "hot" = whose rep falt out said our organs are $_ _,___ per rank. That builder also basically told us what they would build us, without seeing our music = program, without coming to talk to us in person, etc. Our only contact with him was by = phone. Needless to say, I was not impressed.   Our builder offered some great suggestions of how I could tweak my = stoplist and make it even more flexible by moving a couple of things around. He = also offered his opinions on what he thought would work better to give a little = more tonal color. Everything was very minor, and he always deferred to me, but =   when he made a suggestion, he always explained his reason behind making = it, which impressed me, too. He was always very clear and well thought out.   It sounds like Sebastian works very much in the same manner, and I'm sure Malcolm and Mander are the same way. I've consulted on organs before and = never had such wonderful people to work with from the builder's side. Our new instrument's design is probably about 95% Monty and 5% Ruffatti. We spent = hours talking about what we wanted and needed the organ to do, so they = understood the whys and wherefores of what I was trying to accomplish with the = specification. When the builder and the church are all in agreement, a sucessful installation is sure to happen.   Monty Bennett Friendship Missionary Baptist Church Charlotte, NC    
(back) Subject: Re: Hugeness, Hugicity, Hugiosity, Hugiciousness From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 06:22:33 EDT   >A large organ need not be played all at once   Amen, Amen, and Amen! When I was at Calvary, I was amazed at the numbers = of people who would come to see the organ, sit down to play, hit Tutti and proceed. The other thing that amazed me is how much people over = registered by hand. I know that on many smaller instruments, most of the time, one must build = up choruses by having all the principals and the flutes on, in order to beef = up the sound. I also know that on smaller instruments, stops need to often = do double or triple duty. An 8' Flute must be an accompanimental stop and a = solo stop. The lone 8' Swell reed must often be a chorus reed and a solo stop, =   etc., etc. On larger instruments, stops generally only need to serve one purpose--their intended one. To build up a chorus, there is no need to = have all three great principals, all the 4's and 2's, plus the mixtures, and the = full flute chorus, in order to make a proper chorus. All it does is muddy up = the waters. Everything is there, doing a proper job, there's no need for = over-registering. To truly hear the "large organ" sound, hitting Tutti and launching into a piece isn't the way to hear it. Sure, it's loud, but usually loaded down = with couplers and 32' Bombarde, it makes a lot of noise, but it's not subtle. = Most times, a full organ chorus of 16's + reeds and mixtures with suitable = pedal, gives more than enough volume and the chorus is heard better, not = obliterated by stops set for a final chord. A highschool guy came to Calvary once to see =   the organ--I think he was 16 or 17. He sat down, hit tutti, added the = chamades and then launched into a piece. The sound was hideous--loud and painful! = I stopped him and said, try this combination, I think you'll get a better = idea of how the organ sounds. I showed him through some of my general pistons, = and let him have a go at the organ. He had never played anything larger than = a 25 or 30 rank organ. So when he had 205, he just turned it all on, like he = had to do on what he was normally used to playing. I found it to be true more =   times than not, regardless of the age of the player. Only those who had = played large instruments before really knew how to use it to the best advantage.   Monty Bennett    
(back) Subject: Re: Anthem Selection Tool (long) From: "Thurletta Brown-Gavins" <TMBROWN@vance.net> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 07:08:00 -0400   Thanks for the link, Randy. That will be extremely helpful. (And thanks to others who have responded directly!)   Randy, we agree on using lectionary readings that may not be the one on which the sermon is focused, in fact that is why I was so alarmed. I had always relied on the Psalm, epistle or other reading as a key when I did not have an anthem based on the gospel or chosen "sermon reading." My problem was that I have only the "sermon readings" for October to December to work with now. Mercifully, Thanksgiving/Advent/Christmas seasons will simplify most of the planning task. The church will continue to have all four readings. It is just that I don't yet know how far in advance I will get the other three.   Thurletta Brown-Gavins   > SNIP! > I do not agree with you, however, that the anthem should always = "reinforce > the message." That sounds too much like Madison Avenue manipulation to = me. > The Christian message is richer than the narrow focus of one preacher on = any > given Sunday. And it deserves to be heard as well. Why couldn't the = anthem > complement the message? In the lectionary, at least, one has the option = of > choosing an anthem based on one of the scripture passages that the = preacher > may not necessarily be sermonizing on but that, thanks to the wisdom of = the > lectionary compilers, does complement it, is related in some way to the > scripture on which he chooses to preach. Unfortunately, I suppose that = your > neo-orthodox Baptist preacher is probably not going to allow four = scripture > passages to b e read each Sunday (Old Testament, Psalm, Epistle, = Gospel), > since he considers his agenda more important than God's. > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio  
(back) Subject: Re: Hugeness, Hugicity, Hugiosity, Hugiciousness From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 05:00:55 -0700 (PDT)   Helo,   How true!   I recall practising and performing on the organ of Hull City Hall; then the fourth largest instrument in the UK with 184 stops and little in the way of extended ranks apart from the Pedal.   Full organ without the big reeds amounted to 8 Pedal stops out of some 22 or so, 7 stops on the Swell, and maybe 8 or 9 on the Great coupled to the Swell.   Total used =3D 24   Adding further stops merely muddied the waters or created inbalance, and the only sensible addition was the Choir/Positive Cymbel which added a tiny bit of fairy dust to the main chorus.....strictly for Bach of course!   Indeed, FULL organ with everything on, amounted to a hideous noise, with different types of big reeds fighting for supremacy, and the 32ft Diaphone reacting badly with the 16ft Tuba on the pedals.....the latter probably one of the loudest reeds in the whole wide world, voiced flat-out on 20" and capable of ridding the city of pigeons in about 3 seconds.   All big organs should carry a health warning.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RMB10@aol.com wrote: > > Amen, Amen, and Amen! When I was at Calvary, I was > amazed at the numbers of > people who would come to see the organ, sit down to > play, hit Tutti and > proceed.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RSVP From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 06:11:09 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   "If we receive any communication concerning our European Tour, you must let me know immediately, no matter where I am or what I am doing", the Master of the Chorister ordered.   With increasing anxiety, the final details were not falling into place readily, and the Master of the Choristers was desperate to finalise all the arrangements.   Now this was no ordinary choir, and this was no ordinary Master of Choristers; we are talking top quality, but I refrain from naming names. Daily enquiries drew a blank response, and there were difficulties with using the telephone lines. Time was marching on, and everyone becamne increasingly paranoid.   "Don't forget", the Master of the Chrositers repeated, "You must let me know the moment we hear anything".   Thus, on a particularly festive occasion, with the Archbishop in attendance, all the Canons, Clergy and other important souls enjoying polite conversation after Festive Choral Mattins, a small boy ran across the grass and tugged at the surplice of the Master of the Choristers.   "Please Sir!" Came a small voice.   "Not now boy!" The Master replied, attempting to brush the boy aside.   "But Sir!" The boy pleaded.   Impatient and a little annoyed, the Master of the Choristers looked at the boy and growled, "What is it boy?"   "Please Sir! Your French Letters have arrived!"   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: RSVP From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 09:28:57 -0400   Colin, 'et al',   I suspect that your punch line might go down like a lead balloon on this side of the pond.   The device you are referring to is known here, in the vernacular, as a "safe", or a "rubber", - I have never heard it called a French Letter!   However, I believe that the French call them English Letters!   And to keep on topic, they ARE used with organs!   Cheers,   Bob Conway     At 06:11 AM 9/21/03 -0700, Colin wrote: >"But Sir!" The boy pleaded. > >Impatient and a little annoyed, the Master of the >Choristers looked at the boy and growled, "What is it >boy?" > >"Please Sir! Your French Letters have arrived!"      
(back) Subject: RE: OT, Humor - How many group posters does it take to change alight bulb? From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 10:09:40 -0400   Andres Gunther agunther@cantv.net   At least we degree as Master Lightbulb Changers wondering how many ways to do such a job there are out in the field and how on earth we were able to change a lightbulb with *our* method without nasty consequences to this = day.   Cheers Andres always happy to start a busy sunday with a good laugh! :) =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.    
(back) Subject: Re: Disney Hall organ From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 09:37:59 EDT   Greetings all,   I agree with Peter on this one.   That a pipe organ so visually unusual would bring so much public attention = to the nearly hidden world of pipe organ music must be applauded by those who =   are the members of the pipe organ world. My only hope is that the = architect and builder(s) in their humanly infinite wisdom were able to make the audio results as awesome as the visual effects.   Hopefully, Stan Krider   In a message dated 09/20/2003 12:11:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Peter Rodwell writes: > > Re Disney, I find it ironic that so many in the organ world bemoan > the lack of public interest in the organ but the moment a new > instrument appears that is guaranteed to arose public interest, > many of these same people condemn it. I find the design exciting > and I think it's wonderful that an architect (normally second only > to lawyers in the unpopular professions list) has not only interested > himself in the organ but taken the trouble to make it visually > spectacular too. >  
(back) Subject: Preaching/Lectionaries - request education here From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 13:21:17 EDT   List,   I think the posting that I copied and pasted at the end of my message came =   from Bud. This is in response to Bud's message in which he listed all the =   anthems.   I grew up in what I guess is what y'all call a "nonliturgical" church. We =   had our seasons - mainly Easter and Christmas - and that was it. = Occasionally, my family would visit another church or would see another church's = bulletin which would have something printed beneath the date such as: xth Sunday in =   Advent, xth Sunday in Epiphany, etc.   I have a very vague understanding what these terms mean. I'm assuming = that Bach's "The Liturgical Year" are a set of pieces for each of these = particular Sundays of the year. I'm thinking that these particular Liturgical = Seasons emphacize particular aspects of Christ's life.   While I don't agree with many things said by those who hold strongly to Liturgy, I do see great value in understanding these terms. Please don't = flame me, because I'm certain that I'm not using these terms correctly.   I "think" Passion and Easter really speak of the same thing - unless the Passion refers to Christ's sacrifice and Easter more specically celebrates = the Resurrection. Advent =3D coming of Christ,   Can anybody point me to a site (let's not live out the joke about the = group posters here) that explains the meaning of all these terms. Below is what = I copied from the message. I have placed a ** by the terms that I don't understand.   Thanks, Keith     > I have anthems and hymns filed under > > Lift up your heads - Advent 1 > The powers of heaven - Advent 2 > Holy Scripture - Advent 2 > "Gaudete" - Advent 3 > John the Baptist - Advent 4 > > Name of Jesus / Circumcision - Jan. 1 > The Spirit of the Lord - Christmas II > **Epiphany - Jan. 6 > Jesus in the Temple - Epiphany I > Spiritual Gifts - Epiphany II > John the Baptist (again) - Epiphany II > Marriage in Cana - Epiphany III > O Lord, I Am Not Worthy - Epiphany IV > The Final Harvest - Epiphany V > Behold, what manner of love - Epiphany VI > The Last Judgment - Epiphany VI > The Presentation of Christ in the Temple - Feb. 2 > > Come, Labour On - **Septuagesima > The Sower and the Seed - **Sexagesima > Though I speak with the tongues of men - **Quinquagesima > Jesus, Son of David - **Quinquagesima > > Blow ye the trumpet in Zion - Ash Wednesday > Treasures in Heaven (grin) - Ash Wednesday > Now is the accepted time - Lent I > Get thee behind me, Satan - Lent I > Great is thy faithfulness - Lent II > The Holy Eucharist - Lent II > Christ shall give thee light - Lent III > Blessed is the womb that bare thee - Lent III > Jerusalem the golden - Lent IV > "Laetare" - Lent IV > Feeding the multitude - Lent IV > The Holy Eucharist - Lent IV > > The final sacrifice - Passion Sunday > Before Abraham was, I am - Passion Sunday > Thy Rebuke hath broken my heart - Palm Sunday > > The **Triduum takes care of itself ... Go to Dark Gethsemane and a > Eucharistic motet on Maundy Thursday, nothing save the liturgical texts > on Good Friday, and a rousing Easter anthem at the Easter Vigil and on > Easter Day. > > The Five Wounds - Easter I > Receive the Holy Ghost - Easter I > The witness of Water and Blood - Easter I > The Good Shepherd - Easter II > A little while and ye shall not see me - Easter III > The Comforter will reprove the world of sin - Easter IV > We plow the fields and scatter - Easter V (the Rogations) > I have overcome the world - Easter V > > God is gone up - Ascension > When the Comforter is come - Sunday after Ascension > > Come, Holy Ghost - Pentecost > > I am Alpha and Omega - **Trinity Sunday [I understand about the Trinity. = My > question involves what's meant by Trinity Sunday] > God so loved the world - Trinity Sunday > > Dives and Lazarus - Trinity I > Let us love one another - Trinity I > The great supper - Trinity II > The Holy Eucharist - Trinity II > The ninety and nine - Trinity III, and yes, we sang "The Ninety And > Nine" (grin) > Mercy - Trinity IV > They cast their nets - Trinity V > Baptism - Trinity VI > Gifts on the altar - Trinity VI > Eternal life - Trinity VII > Feeding the multitude (again) - Trinity VII > The Holy Eucharist - Trinity VII > Not everyone that saith unto me, Lord, Lord - Trinity VIII > Sons of God - Trinity VIII > The Passover - Trinity IX > The Prodigal Son - Trinity IX > Spiritual Gifts - Trinity X > Cleansing the Temple - Trinity X > Pharisee and Publican - Trinity XI > Deaf hear, dumb speak - Trinity XII > The God of Abraham - Trinity XIII > The Good Samaritan - Trinity XIII > Walk in the Spirit - Trinity XIV > Cleansing the lepers - Trinity XIV > The Cross - Trinity XV > Two masters - Trinity XV > Seek ye first - Trinity XV > At the Name of Jesus - Trinity XVI > Raising the dead - Trinity XVI > One Lord, one Faith, one Baptism - Triniy XVII > He that humbleth himself shall be exalted - Trinity XVII > Jesus, Son of David - Trinity XVIII > Grieve not the Holy Spirit - Trinity XIX > Thy sins be forgiven thee - Trinity XIX > Psalms, hymns and spiritual songs - Trinity XX > The marriage-supper of the Lamb - Trinity XX > The whole armour of God - Trinity XXI > Signs and wonders - Trinity XXI > Forgiveness - Trinity XXII > Citizenship in heaven - Trinity XXIII > Caesar and God - Trinity XXIII > Raising the dead - Trinity XXIV > The LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS - Sunday Next before Advent / Christ the King > Loaves and fishes - Sunday Next >      
(back) Subject: Re: Preaching/Lectionaries - request education here From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 11:40:08 -0700       Kzimmer0817@aol.com wrote: > List, > > I think the posting that I copied and pasted at the end of my message > came from Bud. This is in response to Bud's message in which he listed > all the anthems. > > I grew up in what I guess is what y'all call a "nonliturgical" church. > We had our seasons - mainly Easter and Christmas - and that was it. > Occasionally, my family would visit another church or would see another > church's bulletin which would have something printed beneath the date > such as: xth Sunday in Advent, xth Sunday in Epiphany, etc. > > I have a very vague understanding what these terms mean. I'm assuming > that Bach's "The Liturgical Year" are a set of pieces for each of these > particular Sundays of the year.   Right. The Lutherans have "proper" chorales that are more-or-less appointed for specific Sundays and specific Bible readings; or at least they did in Bach's time. The Liturgical Year (Orgelbuechlein - Little Organ Book) is a collection of chorale-preludes on some of those chorales. Bach had sketched a lot more, but he changed jobs and organ-playing was no longer his main job, so he never finished it.   I'm thinking that these particular > Liturgical Seasons emphacize particular aspects of Christ's life. > > While I don't agree with many things said by those who hold strongly to > Liturgy, I do see great value in understanding these terms. Please > don't flame me, because I'm certain that I'm not using these terms > correctly. > > I "think" Passion and Easter really speak of the same thing - unless the =   > Passion refers to Christ's sacrifice and Easter more specically > celebrates the Resurrection.   Passiontide (now done away with in most churches) is/was from the Sunday BEFORE Palm Sunday through Holy Saturday (the day before Easter) ... the statues and crucifixes were veiled in purple; "Glory be to the Father" was not said or sung; the organ was played as little as possible.   Advent =3D coming of Christ,   Yes, but the emphasis is on the Second Coming, rather than His coming at Christmas.   > > Can anybody point me to a site (let's not live out the joke about the > group posters here) that explains the meaning of all these terms. Below =   > is what I copied from the message. I have placed a ** by the terms that =   > I don't understand. > > Thanks, > Keith > > >> I have anthems and hymns filed under >> >> Lift up your heads - Advent 1 >> The powers of heaven - Advent 2 >> Holy Scripture - Advent 2 >> "Gaudete" - Advent 3   You didn't mark this, but it means "rejoice", from the first word of the Latin Introit ... it's a kind of mid-Advent, just as "Laetare" ("be joyful") is a kind of mid-Lent relaxing of all the rigours of the fasting and extra penances.   >> John the Baptist - Advent 4 >> >> Name of Jesus / Circumcision - Jan. 1 >> The Spirit of the Lord - Christmas II >> **Epiphany - Jan. 6   The manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles ... aka "Three Kings' Day"   The Three Kings saluted the infant King with gifts of gold (kingship), frankincense (godhead), and myrrh (a foreshadowing of his Passion ... myrrh is a burial spice).   It's also called The Day of the Three Miracles, since we celebrate Christ's baptism in the Jordan, his turning water into wine, and ... the other one slips my mind right now ... all three are celebrated during Epiphanytide   >> Jesus in the Temple - Epiphany I >> Spiritual Gifts - Epiphany II >> John the Baptist (again) - Epiphany II >> Marriage in Cana - Epiphany III >> O Lord, I Am Not Worthy - Epiphany IV >> The Final Harvest - Epiphany V >> Behold, what manner of love - Epiphany VI >> The Last Judgment - Epiphany VI >> The Presentation of Christ in the Temple - Feb. 2 >> >> Come, Labour On - **Septuagesima >> The Sower and the Seed - **Sexagesima >> Though I speak with the tongues of men - **Quinquagesima >> Jesus, Son of David - **Quinquagesima   The "countdown" to Easter used to begin with these three Sundays:   Septuagesima - 70 days before Easter Sexagesima - 60 days before Easter Quinquagesiam - 50 days before Easter   >> >> Blow ye the trumpet in Zion - Ash Wednesday >> Treasures in Heaven (grin) - Ash Wednesday >> Now is the accepted time - Lent I >> Get thee behind me, Satan - Lent I >> Great is thy faithfulness - Lent II >> The Holy Eucharist - Lent II >> Christ shall give thee light - Lent III >> Blessed is the womb that bare thee - Lent III >> Jerusalem the golden - Lent IV >> "Laetare" - Lent IV >> Feeding the multitude - Lent IV >> The Holy Eucharist - Lent IV >> >> The final sacrifice - Passion Sunday >> Before Abraham was, I am - Passion Sunday >> Thy Rebuke hath broken my heart - Palm Sunday >> >> The **Triduum takes care of itself ... Go to Dark Gethsemane and a >> Eucharistic motet on Maundy Thursday, nothing save the liturgical texts >> on Good Friday, and a rousing Easter anthem at the Easter Vigil and on >> Easter Day.   Literally, "Triduum Sacrum" - "The Three Holy Days" - Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday - the three days before Easter   "Maundy" comes from the Latin "mandatum" - commandment - the themes of Maundy Thursday are two fold: "A new commandment give I unto you, that ye love one another" (the Foot-Washing Ceremony), and the New Commandment to "Do THIS" ... the Lord's Supper.   Thursday-Friday-Saturday is actually ONE *enormous* Liturgy ... it takes three DAYS to celebrate it ... the Lord's Supper and the Betrayal on Thursday, the Judgment, Scourging, Crucifixion and Burial on Friday, and (formerly) the Watch at the Tomb on Saturday up until about noon, at which point everybody started preparing the church for the Queen Of Feasts, Easter Day (never called Sunday) ... as darkness falls on Saturday, the Church reads the whole of salvation history, from Genesis through the Passover, the Flood, and finally the Prophets, interspersed with the singing of Psalms and Canticles.   The New Fire is lit, and all the lamps in the church are lit from it, and the peoples' hand-candles. The deacon sings the solemn announcement of Easter, the "Exsultet" (Rejoice now, O ye heavenly legions of Angels), baptismal water is blessed, the candidates are baptized, then all the saints in glory are invoked, and finally the organ (which has been silent for three days) bursts forth with Gloria in excelsis, the church bells peal, the deacon shouts "Christ is risen!" and the people answer "The Lord is risen indeed!"   And it's Easter.   >> >> The Five Wounds - Easter I >> Receive the Holy Ghost - Easter I >> The witness of Water and Blood - Easter I >> The Good Shepherd - Easter II >> A little while and ye shall not see me - Easter III >> The Comforter will reprove the world of sin - Easter IV >> We plow the fields and scatter - Easter V (the Rogations) >> I have overcome the world - Easter V >> >> God is gone up - Ascension >> When the Comforter is come - Sunday after Ascension >> >> Come, Holy Ghost - Pentecost >> >> I am Alpha and Omega - **Trinity Sunday [I understand about the >> Trinity. My question involves what's meant by Trinity Sunday] >> God so loved the world - Trinity Sunday >> Trinity Sunday is the Sunday set aside to celebrate the DOCTRINE of the Holy Trinity, though in every Mass Christ's Sacrifice is offered to his Father through the working of the Holy Spirit, who is invoked to consecrate Christ's Body and Blood on the Altar ("epiclesis").   Ask away ... there was a time when *I* didn't know any of this either (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: RSVP From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 14:36:02 EDT   Bob Conway wrote: "And to keep on topic, they ARE used with organs!" That is correct, they are used WITH organs, not IN organs. We're just getting the last of the Perflex removed, and we don't wish = to experiment with anything else...   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Overture Hall, Madison, WI From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 15:02:12 -0400   On 9/19/03 10:41 PM, "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> wrote:   > Here are details of the new Pleasant Rowland Concert Organ. Ms. Rowland = is > from the American Girl Doll Collection. The highlight of the organ will = be > its totally movable design, being stored in a "garage" behind the stage = when > not in use.   Mike: I went through the whole thing carefully, and am VERY impressed. Three cheers for Madison!   Alan