PipeChat Digest #4005 - Monday, September 22, 2003
 
bad music, no music
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: what are the Three Miracles celebrated at Epiphany
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Transfiguratin
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Good Mornin
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Registration
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Atlantic City Organs
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Day of Three Miracles/Bud
  by <MMccal7284@aol.com>
Re: Atlantic City Organs
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Good Mornin
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: stop controls
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
RE: Bud, etc
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Atlantic City Organs and the hungry
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Riverside Church, which is NOT an Aeolian-Skinner
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Triduum & Three Miracles
  by "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net>
Re: Disney,... - Oh My!
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Disney,... - Oh My!
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: bad music, no music From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 08:26:38 -0700   Well, Ray, if you're going to dismiss history AND the Church Fathers as "personal opinion", and/or change the parameters of the discussion, then there's no reason to continue it.   Your original statement, which I challenged, was that music was not a requisite for liturgical worship, and that the absence of music returned the liturgy to the essentials of worship, or words to that effect.   We weren't discussing BAD music versus NO music. I agree with THAT, though I must say I have seen as many (probably MORE) slovenly celebrations of Low Masses WITHOUT music as I have excruciating celebrations of High Masses WITH music.   Bud Clark     Ray Ahrens wrote: > It all sounds like personal opinion to me. Like I've said, I'd rather > have no music than bad music. > > >From: quilisma@cox.net > >Reply-To: "PipeChat" > >To: PipeChat > >Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: preaching, and lectionaries > >Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2003 21:57:36 -0700 > > > >Read the Church Fathers, Ray ... music IS a requisite of liturgical > >worship. The medieval Low Mass was a corruption; it has no > >counterpart to this day in the Eastern Churches. > > > >I would rather SING *to* God than listen to a man talk ABOUT him. > > > >I'm reminded of the late Fr. William Cook, sometime rector of St. > >James Episcopal Church on 55th Street in Cleveland. On Easter Day, > >he came to the altar steps at the end of Mass (NOT having preached), > >and said > > > >"In the protestant churches today, they'll be talking about the > >Risen Christ; we don't need to do that; the Risen Christ is with us > >... here, and now." > > > >Whereupon he turned, assumed the humeral veil, opened the > >Tabernacle, and deposited the Blessed Sacrament in the monstrance; > >we struck up "Hail Thee, Festival Day" with trumpets blaring, and > >the procession took off round the church. A more fitting end to the > >Easter Mass I cannot imagine, even though it would undoubtedly make > >present-day liturgists' hair stand on end. > > > >For one thing, God can speak to us in the Liturgy in ways that > >preachers cannot imagine. MOST of my objection to preachers and > >preaching is their crabbed, cramped, narrow, myopic, > >anthropormorphic (sp?) view of God. > > > >And by the way, I don't object to your description of liturgy as > >performance art ... it is indeed that, and among the most ancient. > >"To DO" is "To PERFORM", is it not? There's nothing dishonourable in > >PERFORMING the liturgy, or PERFORMING the music, except when seen > >through the prism of Calvinism, Jansenism, and Puritanism, which > >distrusts the engaging of ANY of the senses (save hearing only) in > >divine worship. CATHOLIC worship, on the other hand, engages ALL the > >senses, and rightfully so, as God gave us the senses as a means of > >perceiving His presence. > > > >Cheers, > > > >Bud > > > >Ray Ahrens wrote: > >> > >> >(1) Preaching should be ABOLISHED, at least in liturgical > >>churches. > >> >If you do the LITURGY with attention and devotion (and ALL the > >> >associated music), there's nothing more to say. > >> > >>Here we go again. Worship as performance art. I've been to > >>liturgical services where there has been preaching and no music. > >>Gets right to the heart of worship. Music is not a prerequisite. > >> > >> > >> > >> >You've HEARD the Word chanted or read; you've RECEIVED the Word > >> > >> >Incarnate in Holy Communion; there's nothing to add. And poor > >> >preaching often DISTRACTS from those two experiences. > >> > >>Poor music is worse than poor preaching imho. > >> > >> > >> > >> >The problem with preaching in NON-liturgical churches is that > >>the > >> > >> >success of the entire service hangs on the preacher's ability > >>(or > >> >lack of it). You have only to observe the dwindling crowds at > >>the > >> >Crystal Cathedral under Dr. Schuller's son to see what I mean. > >>He's > >> >not a BAD preacher, but the place was built on his father's > >>force of > >> >personality in the pulpit, among other things. > >> > >>There surely must be other factors. He is but one of many leaders > >>of that church. > >> > >> >Lacking a liturgy to CARRY it, a non-liturgical preaching > >>service > >> > >> >can be EXCRUCIATING if the preacher isn't OUTSTANDING, and not > >> >EVERYBODY *can* be outstanding. At my one Presbyterian post, the > >> >preacher was EXCELLENT, but I kept thinking to myself, "how do > >>they > >> >sit THROUGH this EVERY SUNDAY??!!" > >> > >>Because they obviously get something out of it. > >> > >> > = >>------------------------------------------------------------------------ > >>Get McAfee virus scanning and cleaning of incoming attachments. Get > >>Hotmail Extra Storage! "Pipe > >>Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > >>organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: > >>mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: > >>mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: > >>mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > >topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > Instant message in style with MSN Messenger 6.0. Download it now FREE! > <http://g.msn.com/8HMAENUS/2734??PS=3D>        
(back) Subject: Re: what are the Three Miracles celebrated at Epiphany From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 08:31:25 -0700   I think if you'll look at your Lesser Feasts and Fasts (or whatever the Lutheran equivalent is), you'll find that the READINGS of the last Sunday of Epiphanytide ARE those of the Transfiguration, but the FEAST of the Transfiguration is kept on August 6th, as it "always" has been. But since not all Lutheran churches keep weekday holy-days, you might not be aware of it.   Since Transfiguration is a more major feast in the Anglican Church than it is in the Roman or the Lutheran, I think even our new lectionary DOESN'T read the Transfiguration lessons in Epiphanytide, but I'm not sure about that ... I know the OLD one didn't.   In any case, Anglicans are a LOT more likely to have a week-day Mass with music on August 6th than our Roman or Lutheran brethren (grin).   Alan ... help us out here ... has something changed? Don't Lutherans still celebrate August 6th?   Cheers,   Bud   Jeff White wrote: > Transfiguration in August? In the Lutheran world, this is the last = Sunday > of Epiphany before Lent. > > Jeff > > >>-----Original Message----- >>From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >>quilisma@cox.net >>Sent: Sunday, September 21, 2003 11:59 PM >>To: PipeChat >>Subject: what are the Three Miracles celebrated at Epiphany >> >> >>No, we celebrate that in August ... the Baptism, the Wedding at Cana, >>and ... somebody help me out here. >> >>Cheers, >> >>Bud >> >>Jeff White wrote: >> >>>>It's also called The Day of the Three Miracles, since we celebrate >>>>Christ's baptism in the Jordan, his turning water into wine, >>> >>and ... the >> >>>>other one slips my mind right now ... all three are celebrated during >>>>Epiphanytide >>> >>> >>>Transfiguration, Bud?? >>> >>>Jeff >>>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >>> >>> >>> >> >> >> >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >        
(back) Subject: Transfiguratin From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 11:27:49 -0400   On 9/22/03 1:17 AM, "Jeff White" <reedstop@charter.net> wrote:   > Transfiguration in August? In the Lutheran world, this is the last = Sunday > of Epiphany before Lent.   It's been all over the map, Jeff. Like Visitation. Lutherans used to do = it on August 6, and probably a great many still do, especially outside the U.S.. ELCA (but not LCMS) still permits its observance then. But up = until the unseemly death of the 'Gesimas, 30? years ago, we all did it in = August. With that change, and the enlargement of Epiphany, Transfiguration became the last Sunday thereof for most folks, "recognizing the role of the event as a preview of the glory of Christ given before the onset of the = Passion." The Romans, on the other hand, do it on the Second Sunday in Lent, as I recall.   Change is OK. But it would be nice if we could all do them at the same time.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Good Mornin From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 11:52:22 EDT   Hi Nate:   What the Atlantic City organs need is a friendly infusion of cash from a consortium of people like Bill Gates. These are people who could make a sizeable contribution with out missing it, say $100 million. Donald Trump right across the street wouldn't miss it either. It will take people like that to get the job done. It's too big a job for just one builder. It would give everyone needed work. Big organs require big ideas, and extremely wealthy people to bank roll such a project. If we are ever to hear this magnificent organ again, it will take the above to do it. What we need is to convince these people or others like them to just do it.   Suggestion,   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Registration From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 12:25:37 -0400   On 9/22/03 3:33 AM, "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:   Bruce, were it you what posted that URL for Clent? Art it you at the console? I dug through its onion-like layers with great delight. It's an absolute picnic. I urge all to take another look, when you need a totally aimless "break". Don't forget the parts about Folklore, and Farming. I = know it's terribly Americocentric of me, but the UK really IS a "foreign country." Here's the address:   >> For further information, I'd be happy for you to visit >> http://www.clent-worcs.co.uk >>   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organs From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 12:27:34 -0400   At 11:52 AM 9/22/03 -0400, Ron Severin wrote: >What the Atlantic City organs need is a friendly infusion of cash >from a consortium of people like Bill Gates. These are people >who could make a sizeable contribution with out missing it, say >$100 million. Donald Trump right across the street wouldn't miss it >either. It will take people like that to get the job done. It's too big >a job for just one builder. It would give everyone needed work. Big >organs require big ideas, and extremely wealthy people to bank >roll such a project. If we are ever to hear this magnificent organ >again, it will take the above to do it. What we need is to convince >these people or others like them to just do it.   Ron 'et al',   Whilst I can understand your sentiments regarding the upkeep of the Atlantic City organs, if there is $100, 000, 000 being made available, I would wish it to be spent on a much more worthy cause.   There are whole nations in the Third World countries that could benefit much more than the rebuilding of a couple of organs. In the United States =   alone there are millions of people who are on the poverty line, and you = are suggesting that a couple of oversized instruments be placed before that = need.   Let's get our priorities right.   Bob        
(back) Subject: Day of Three Miracles/Bud From: <MMccal7284@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 12:37:14 EDT   Am not quite certain, but believe the third miracle may be Jesus and the Samaritan woman at Jacob's well. Somehow, it seems (IIRC) that all three = miracles have to do with water. Just my two cents. MaryLee  
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organs From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 12:47:45 EDT   Bob:   We are feeding the hungry, but it will never be enough. Poverty is a lifestyle. I do have my priorities straight. What very famous person, Said,"The poor you will always have with you". It takes the poor, to work hard, to get out of poverty. Handouts don't work. Work, ideals, goals and possible in every case except mental and physical disease. Handicapped people also make their way in the world. Despair, vises, evil will produce poverty. It takes work and belief to over come it, and is entirely possible. Sloth, and laziness also produce it. It's a curable disease. There are no victims. Now let's get back to finding money to rebuild an organ or two.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Good Mornin From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 10:05:21 -0500   Hi, Ron, Nate, et al: > What the Atlantic City organs need is a friendly infusion > of cash from a consortium of people like Bill Gates... I have never been to the Atlantic City hall, but an idea just crossed my mind. If football and baseball arenas are being replaced regularly, such as Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, the Polo Grounds, Houston's Astrodome, etc., etc., etc... what is to say that the existing hall is desirable for a "contemporary" crowd? Might the obvious repair bill for the pipe organ at the Atlantic City hall be an indication that this place no longer attracts the massive crowds? Where are they going? Try Las Vegas, San Diego, San Francisco, Chicago, New York, New Orleans, Atlanta, and Dallas, etc., etc., etc... where they get up-to-date creature comforts for their conventions. Maybe the hall, itself, has passed its prime as a place to convene. Just an idea. F. Richard Burt ..  
(back) Subject: Re: stop controls From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:17:49 -0400   > Good evening all! Check out the pics of this console!!! > > http://www.orgelsite.nl/kerken12/oestringen.htm   There are two Steiner-Reck organs in northern Virginia with similar = consoles. One at St Luke's RC, McLean and the other at The Falls Church, Episcopal, Falls Church. However, the push-button stops on both are laid out in a = more conventional order on both sides of the console rather than all being = bunched up on the left as on this example. The push-buttons are toggle switches, = btw.   Cheers, TommyLee Reston, VA    
(back) Subject: RE: Bud, etc From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:18:38 -0400   Charles Peery writes:   > There was so much committee drama that, as far as the larger = congregation was concerned (and because, I=20 too, was loath to openly criticize the clergy or the governing = committees) I simply resigned without making more waves. So, I'm = saying to everyone: MAKE WAVES! MAKE WAVES!   But you just got done saying that the clergy always win. So what's the = point?   One of my friends, upon my joining his choir several years after we = first became acquainted, *immediately* began telling me about what an = a**h*** the rector was, and shared with me some limericks, cartoons, = etc. that he had written against him. The rector was in fact an almost = certifiable nut case who was soon forced to retire, and, well, in this = case I felt loyal to my friend who had genuine grievances. But I pitied = him, as I pity anyone who must hold a job in which he hates his boss. =20   When I'm the O/C, I instinctively feel loyal to the rector or dean; and = if I have too many disagreements or whatever to do that, as has happened = to me only once in adulthood, I feel very uncomfortable. I might open = my heart to one or two intimate friends, but otherwise it's see-no-evil, = hear-no-evil, speak-no-evil. Call it the only-child syndrome, perhaps: = always looking for parental approval (I'm not actually an only child, = but sometimes people mistake me for one), but I don't quite understand = taking a man's money and then talking against him behind his back. It = may be different in situations where one is answerable to a lay = committee rather than a clergyman, but I have usually found those setups = tough to begin with (although I must admit that a lay committee has = never fired me).   If you are loved universally enough to make waves successfully by = staying, don't you also make waves effectively by quitting?    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organs and the hungry From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 10:44:31 -0700   I think reality lies somewhere between these two extremes. In California, at least, "the poor" are more and more hard-working FAMILIES who have LOST their jobs because of the economy, and the continued concentration of wealth in the upper 1% of the population.   In the time of the "robber barons," just before the stockmarket crash of 1929, the CEO of a company typically drew 20 times the salary of an average worker. TODAY, he/she draws 100 to more than 1000 times the average worker, plus stock options, golden parachutes, perks, and all the rest.   There are solutions, but they would cause major social and economic upheavals.   (1) raising livestock in a feed-lot is THE most INEFFICIENT use of grain on the planet. That same grain, if used to make flour, bread, and cereals, could feed ... I forget ... 10 times (?) the number that the feedlot-raised livestock feed.   (2) because of the restraints of capitalism and the "factory farm" conglomerates, we BURN enough surplus grain in the US every year to FEED *most* of Africa. Ditto dumping surplus milk to keep the price artificially inflated for dairy farmers.   (3) that same grain COULD be used to make gasohol, but the oil cartels are having none of THAT. We are only JUST discovering how MUCH of our national energy policy AND our national energy BILL is being written by greedy corporations like ENRON.   (4) the Republicans have consistently fought tax breaks and incentives for developing alternative energy sources. In most of California, for instance, it's RIDICULOUS that solar energy isn't used for heating ... but there's no incentive to do so ... well, there wasn't until the recent big energy crunch.   In a household with four people, three on SSI and one (me) on welfare and food stamps, our monthly energy bill is more than $200. Rent is $1600 for a very modest 2 br cottage in a "questionable" area of town. Food is $400-$600. Car insurance is $200. Internet access, without which I couldn't run my music typesetting "business" ... don't bother reporting me ... I don't charge ... I "accept donations" (grin) is $50.00. Lifeline phone service is 40.00.   Our total income is around $3300 per month.   $3300 -1600 =3D1700 - 200 =3D1500 - 600 =3D1100 - 200 =3D 900 - 50 =3D 850 - 40 =3D 810 - left for everything ELSE, for FOUR people ... that's $200 apiece =   for clothes, household supplies, car repairs, meds NOT covered by Medicare, etc.   Our cars are 13 and 23 years old, respectively. They have to be kept running.   The other three have Medicare; I have NO health insurance at the moment.   My out-of-pocket expense for heart medications is $1000 per month.   Do the math.   I'm not taking them.   It's easy to rail against the "shiftless, lazy poor" on the one hand, and rail against restoring the Atlantic City organ on the other, but neither is ENTIRELY accurate. The $11-$20 million it would take to restore Atlantic City is a drop in the bucket. Try comparing what the CONTINUING cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could have done to alleviate poverty instead. THAT'S a more realistic comparison.   It's not just that "the poor need to work hard" to break the cycle of poverty. There have to be fundamental changes in government and society.   There are factors at work over which we (the poor) have no control. I've worked hard all my life ... sometimes two and three jobs simultaneously .... my retirement will consist of Social Security. Period. I've never managed to save a DIME being a church musician. I HAVE no portfolio, no rental properties, NOTHING. Yes, I chose to be a church musician, but the consequences seem very far away at 20 years of age. At 59 years of age, after two strokes and two heart attacks, they are quite a BIT more proximate (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Bob: > > We are feeding the hungry, but it will never be enough. Poverty is > a lifestyle. I do have my priorities straight. What very famous person, > Said,"The poor you will always have with you". It takes the poor, > to work hard, to get out of poverty. Handouts don't work. Work, ideals, > goals and possible in every case except mental and physical disease. > Handicapped people also make their way in the world. Despair, vises, > evil will produce poverty. It takes work and belief to over come it, and > is entirely possible. Sloth, and laziness also produce it. It's a = curable > disease. There are no victims. Now let's get back to finding money > to rebuild an organ or two. > > Ron Severin        
(back) Subject: RE: Riverside Church, which is NOT an Aeolian-Skinner From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:42:23 -0400   Michael Fox writes:   > I'm not sure St. Thomas is a whit better as an instrument.   Can someone enlighten me-- I've always wondered-- as to the extent of = the changes that Uncle Gerry has made to it?   I heard it just once before 1985. That was 1971, when William himSelf = demonstrated it briefly to me, concentrating on the latest = transformations by Gilbert Adams, whom he described as a great genius.=20   Many people will decry what they did to it; in fact, doesn't rumor have = it that Self was eased out of his position partly because of this = project?   I'm sure that the organ has undergone some refinement and minor changes = since that time, but isn't it essentially still Adams' concept, as it = stands today?   There are many things to like in it; in fact, I can't say there is a = single stop that I don't like. And if you don't pile too much on at = once, the sound is always clear and clean. But one might wish for more = variety: for such a large organ, I find it strangely limited. Draw a = stop on the left: hmm, that's nice. Draw a stop on the right: more of = the same. And 7000-some pipes with only one enclosed division and maybe = two celestes...??      
(back) Subject: Triduum & Three Miracles From: "terry hicks" <Terrick@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 12:50:52 -0500 (CDT)   To be as clear as possible, in the Roman Church the Triduum begins with the Mass of the Lord's Supper, Maunday Thursday evening, and ends Easter Sunday evening with Vespers. From Thursday evening to Sunday evening makes the three liturgical days of the Triduum. Since I've not worked in Lutheran or Episcopal churches since the 80's, I've lost touch with "official" writings from those communions. That's why I said I'd have to dig in my books to see if there's anything. The Roman church also screwed around with the days of Lent, and now there's general confusion about whether Sundays are part of the 40 days or not. Technically, the 3 days after Ash Wednesday are called the "days after Ash Wednesday" and not the first days of Lent...go figure.   Regarding three miracles on Epiphany, I believe the Orthodox celebrate the three Manifestations of Epiphany: the visit of the Magi, the Baptism of Christ, the wedding miracle.    
(back) Subject: Re: Disney,... - Oh My! From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:51:35 -0400   > I'd truly like to hear architects' reaction to the Disney design. We > organists are not capable of impartial judgment. I'd also be interested > in a psychological slant - and I > am dead serious. My first reaction was: > Disney=3Dcartoons. I thought the architect > was making fun at our expense. Oh well.   And my first reaction was that the designer was making the organ fun in = order to appeal to the young. Different folks, etc.   I think my first memories of anything resembling a pipe organ was Grumpy's =   little organ in Snow White. I think it did a lot to spark my later = interest in organs and organ music, though obviously, I eventually found out there nothing like it existed, with its totem-pole pipes and little flappers = opening and closing to make music. Still, it was a fun visual and got me = interested.   Was Grumpy's jolly cartoon organ making fun at our expense? I think not. = Not only that, but it was obvious that even curmudgeonly, harrumpfing old = Grumpy was having FUN playing jaunty dance music for the entertainment of the = rest of the party. What an enviable position to be in!   The design of the new Disney organ is in keeping with recent Disney = animation, for instance, as seen in Beauty and the Beast, where the candlesticks, = silver ware and other items are alive, talking, dancing and so on, and the perspectives are off. In fact, my first thought on seeing the design was = of this movie. It should delight children who love this line of movies.   Note also that Wayne Leupold uses cartoon designs of organs in his publications which are geared towards youngsters in order to make the = beast less intimidating and more appealing to children.   Let us hope that the design is successful in delighting new generations of =   children and sparking their interest to learn to appreciate the organ in = all its wonderfully different forms, and that it will talk and dance in their imaginations throughout their lives (and ours!). It seems to me that this = is the intent of the new design.   And let's hope also that there are many fine organists who will make = joyous music on this organ for generations to come. Personally I'd love to see a =   series of concerts there with Felix Hell, Ken Cowan, and other young = organists there geared towards children, playing Disney favorites, and explaining = the workings of the organ. Even better, a feature length video in the vein of =   "Fantasia" centered around the organ. Who knows? It might work!   Cheers, TommyLee    
(back) Subject: Re: Disney,... - Oh My! From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 11:03:22 -0700       TommyLee Whitlock wrote: >>I'd truly like to hear architects' reaction to the Disney design. We >>organists are not capable of impartial judgment. I'd also be interested >>in a psychological slant - and I >>am dead serious. My first reaction was: >>Disney=3Dcartoons. I thought the architect >>was making fun at our expense. Oh well. > > > And my first reaction was that the designer was making the organ fun in = order > to appeal to the young. Different folks, etc. > > I think my first memories of anything resembling a pipe organ was = Grumpy's > little organ in Snow White. I think it did a lot to spark my later = interest > in organs and organ music, though obviously, I eventually found out = there > nothing like it existed, with its totem-pole pipes and little flappers = opening > and closing to make music. Still, it was a fun visual and got me = interested. > > Um, not so far-fetched ... isn't that how Holtkamp's "polyphone" and Compton and Oberlinger's "cube" work? You just don't see the flaps moving (grin).   Cheers,   Bud