PipeChat Digest #4019 - Friday, September 26, 2003
 
AC Ideas
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
free sheet music
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: 64' full length pedal stops
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Ashton under Lyne nr Manchester
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: live 365
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Theatre Organist
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Sydney Torch
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Sydney Torch at the Gaumont State, Kilburn, London
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: AC Ideas
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: AC Ideas
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: AC Ideas
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Wicks & Hammond
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Haas recital SW Ontario
  by "Anya/Andreas" <atal@sympatico.ca>
 

(back) Subject: AC Ideas From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 06:52:26 -0400   Good morning all,   I was thinking/wondering about various things concerning the ACCH organ...   1 - Would it be feasible to encapsulate these new service lines in the chambers that are making things so wet? This would be a pipe within a = pipe, with some air space in between, and maybe a make-shift fan circulating air through so that moisture wouldn't want to rest there? I was thinking a large diameter pipe could surround the service pipe and also be pitched. Then the larger pipe would be open to the outside of the chamber at either end creating an effective seal to the inside of the chamber, while = retaining the climate conditions of the outside.   2 - Since it is so humid where the organ is, is there something beefier = that can be put on the wooden parts to keep it safer from moisture (ie: spar urethane or something like that)?   That's it for now, time to go do battle with a small tracker, have a great day!   = -Nate   "The apprentice"      
(back) Subject: free sheet music From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 08:44:45 -0300   Dear list,   I don't know if you know, but this site contains free online sheet music of the organ works of Pachelbel , Buxtehude, Froberger, Bach and other works of piano   http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/multimedia/music-scores/freemusic/      
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 04:50:47 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Thanks for that!   Sidney Torch was essentially a pianist with a plodding left foot, but what fingers he had.   His up-tempo playing is still remarkable to this day, and whilst many have attempted to imitate his style, no one has ever succeeded properly.   He was a great entertainer, a great arranger and a great performer.....but was he the organist's organist I wonder?   Let's see what other say before I chip in with my ten cents worth.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- M Fox <ophicleide16@direcway.com> wrote:   > Sidney Torch is The Man. (And Robert Noehren admired > him as well, so it's > not just me). > >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: 64' full length pedal stops From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 07:01:58 -0500   At 10:57 PM -0400 09/25/03, RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > >Make that three full length 64' reeds, as Atlantic City Boardwalk >Hall has a 64' full length Dulzian Phonon or something like that. >   Actually the 64' octave is a Diaphone not a reed. Midmer-Losh did experiment with a "Dual Boot" containing both a Diaphone beater and a reed for that octave but it didn't work out so the bottom of that stop is a true Diaphone   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Ashton under Lyne nr Manchester From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 05:05:51 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   The Lewis organ of Albion URC, Ashton-under-Lyne, is onw of the two greatest Lewis organs remaining; the other being the restored instrument at Southwark Cathedral.   The Ashton organ remains tonally untouched, and is nothing short of stupendous in a large, hammer-beam church with a fine, spacious acoustic.....it is an organ worthy of international pilgrimage.   The reference to J J Binns 1959 is perhaps not as curious as it may first appear. The interests of the company were taken over by some of his workmen, and the J J Binns name was still popularly used. However, the proper name for the company was Binns, Fitton & Haley, and they continued to do work until, maybe, 1964-ish????   One of their better organs is that in Sledmere House, as re-built by Geoffrey Coffin. Sledmere is a great, rambling country pile, and the home of the Tatton-Sykes family of noble-folk. I advised his grace about the plans for rebuilding the organ which, so far as I know, he more or less followed in good time, with one or two additional features suggested by Geoffrey Coffin.   At least it prevented J W Walker putting in a squeaky-clean, 2 manual tracker baroque instrument!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> wrote: > The National Pipe Organ Register notes a rebuilt 4 > manual Lewis in Albion > U.R.C.,   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 05:17:04 -0700 (PDT)   Mmmmm,   A bit of quality here I see!   Quentin Maclean was educated at Leipzig, and studied organ with Karl Straube. He also studied composition with Max Reger....quite a pedigree for a cinema organist, to say the least!!   He was also the son of Alex Maclean, better known as "the God of Scarborough", who made the Spa Orchestra famous.   In turn, Alex Maclean was a close frind of the organist of Westminster RC Cathedral, C S Terry, and on completion of his studies, young Quentin became assistant organist at Westminster Cathedral.   Maclean wrote an organ concerto which Thalben-Ball admired. It remains unpublished so far as I know.   I have seldom heard ANY cinmea organist use counterpoint in light music, the way that Maclean could, and his style was both virtuosic and highly musical. He was, I believe, the first recording artist ever to indulge in multi-tracking, by playing the orchestral part to the Grieg Piano Concerto on the organ, and then adding the piano solo part as the master replayed at 78rpm into a microphone....all done in one take, and achieved by careful timing marks and a wall mounted stop watch. An heroic achievement which still impresses to-day.   They tell me that Reg Foort (FRCO) was THE man for orchestral transcriptions....some say better than Maclean.   However, I think we are getting closer to what I thought the choice might come down to.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- bobelms <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote: > Quentin MacLean, or Reggie Foort > Bob Elms.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: live 365 From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 07:34:24 -0500   There isn't ever a fee to listen to ORGANLive, unless all the listener = spots are full, and then only preferred members can get in, but I can = assure you there are more than enough listener spots. Live365.com does = like you to create a user account so it can keep up with your presets. = Usually the player window remembers who you are and automatically logs = you in to begin listening. If it doesn't, you'll be presented with a = login prompt on your player window. If you're still not getting there, = you might try http://live365.trakhelp.com/ for some answers. Brent Johnson ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand www.organlive.com ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Dr. Amy Fleming=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2003 6:04 AM Subject: live 365     I used to have no problem getting on Organ Live 365 but now it won't = let me access it free. I don't think that I listen enough to pay for = it. Anyone else still having trouble? Amy  
(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 20:45:14 +0800   Yes Ron, but my query was not about organs, the pitch of which can be changed to suit the orchestra. The woodwinds would be my worry as, unless they have their oboes and clarinets specially made for A=3D445, they would never be able to tune that high.   Regarding hymn singing the English Concert Pitch used until the 1940s was much higher than a=3D440 (Not sure now, but it could have been as high as A=3D512, perhaps Colin Mitchell in the UK may know), so singing at 435 pitch doesn't come into it as far as England and ex colonies such as Australia who used the English pitch are concerned. I have heard it said that the hymn books of the 19th Century Anglican Church A and M) were "unsingably high' and I guess unless you were a boy soprano that would be the case. However the publishers of the latest hymn book published for Australian Churches (Together in Song), seem to have taken it for granted that the congregations are tuneless musical morons and have pitched the hymns so low that a choir with child trebles, boy or girl have some difficulty in getting down low enough, and the basses have real problems with the low notes in the bass line. Some notes in the melody line are as low as G. Fine for bathroom baritones but not so fine for trained choirs. BTW my organ is nominally A=3D440 at 70F but when I checked it a few days ago when the temperature was about 50F the pitch was A-435. That makes the new hymn book even worse for choir use.   As I said in my last posting A=3D440 was adopted in my state in about 1948. Possibly that was the date for Australia. Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: RonSeverin@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2003 12:12:06 EDT   >Hi Nate: > >On A=3D440 IMHO a check with the Department of weights and measures >may give some idea when this particular pitch was adopted. I don't >think >there was a seminal day anyone can point to where everyone made the >decission to go with it. It was a gradual, but rapid adoption for >pianos, >orchestral instruments and eventually the organ. Even to day organs >tuned to work with orchestras at 444 or 442 ae in existence. Some >existing organs have been raised from 435 to the desired pitch such >as Boston Symphony Hall. Frank Hastings pitched one of his Cathedral >organs to 459 and later lowered it to 450. As far as Universal >Adoption, >you can say a majority have but not all. A=3D435 may be more >comfortable >for the average congregation to sing hymns, especially the male >voice, >but A=3D444 or 442 to accomodate string player wishing a more brilliant >sound. I think it's safe to say there is an "Official Adoption" but >it's >never been "Universal". > >Ron Severin >    
(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 20:50:40 +0800   Ron, I have not researched the subject lately but it is my understanding that the lower than A=3D440 pitches were used in Europe and the USA but NOT in the UK which had a Concert Pitch of much higher than A=3D440. The change to A=3D440 came some time in the 1940s as far as I know. It certainly did in this country. nd yes, hymns were pitched at least half a tone higher, sometimes a whole tone. Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: RonSeverin@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2003 22:24:58 EDT   >Bob:   >Would you agree with me that hymns were pitched a half step higher >perhaps a hundred years ago, when organs were pitched below >A-440? The raising unilaterally of the middle A is a modern fetish. >I'm just as happy playing an organ with A=3D435. It really doesn't make >any difference to me as long as the tuning is stable. Some pianos >were built to be tuned to 435. Raising the pitch can cause all sorts >of problems. The real question is: is A=3D440 Official or Universal. I >say it's official not universal. There is a difference. > >The pipes in the organ I play were made to play at A=3D435. The highest >we could tune them was somewhere around 438 without causing >speach problems with the pipes. Slotted strings are rather >unforgiving, >and Haskell bases do have their limits. Both can get rather cranky. >We didn't want to revoice them or cut them off. We went as far as we >dared to go. The pipes are old and are happy just the way they are. > >Ron Severin >    
(back) Subject: RE: Theatre Organist From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 21:20:00 +0800   Yes. Also Reginald Dixon, Sandy MacPherson. Bob.   -- >I was surprised that no one has mentioned Jesse Crawford, "The Poet >of the >Organ."    
(back) Subject: Sydney Torch From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:25:21 -0400   Back in the late 1930's I used to go to the Gaumont State cinema in = Kilburn, London, - not so much for the movies, but to hear Sydney Torch = play during the intermissions!   He was a fine organist with a great flair for showmanship.   My vote would go for him.   Bob Conway  
(back) Subject: Sydney Torch at the Gaumont State, Kilburn, London From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:31:02 -0400   In the late 1930's I used to try to go every week to the Gaumont State = Theatre in Kilburn, London, - not so much for the movies, but to hear = and see Sydney Torch doing his stuff!   he was a great organist and a great showman, my vote would have to go = for him.   Bob Conway  
(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:47:45 -0400   On 9/25/03 8:15 PM, "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote:   > A=3D440 was actually accepted universally as the standard   Bob, when that question was first posted a few days ago, I rejected it out of hand because I read it just as you did--but I was wrong. If you've = still got it, read it again, and you'll see that it isn't phrased the way you're putting it (and I also understood it). It referred to something like "mainstream" instruments/organizations.   As Ron correctly points out, it is NOT "universal" by any means, nor is it "THE standard."   Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 22:08:33 +0800   Sorry Alan, I'm not with you. What have I misread ?   A=3D440 is certainly the standard in this country. I don't know of any other pitch in use except for some ancient instrumental groups. Some Electronic organs have A=3D415 as an alternative to accommodate some music which was written for that pitch, otherwise it's A-440 and has been for over 50 years here. Bob.   ---- Original Message ---- From: acfreed0904@earthlink.net To: pipechat@pipechat.org, Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:47:45 -0400   >On 9/25/03 8:15 PM, "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote: > >> A=3D440 was actually accepted universally as the standard > >Bob, when that question was first posted a few days ago, I rejected >it out >of hand because I read it just as you did--but I was wrong. If >you've still >got it, read it again, and you'll see that it isn't phrased the way >you're >putting it (and I also understood it). It referred to something like >"mainstream" instruments/organizations. > >As Ron correctly points out, it is NOT "universal" by any means, nor >is it >"THE standard." > >Alan > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:48:51 -0500   Another idea came to me: Has there been any research done or examples of attempting a wireless console? Where the organ sends signals to a master controller of some sort (either infrared or frequency or digital = frequency). I would think that would eliminate the same type of destruction on the = ACCH organ, what with its massive set of pipes and wires.   Mike Franch Madison, WI     >From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: AC Ideas >Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 06:52:26 -0400 > >Good morning all, > > I was thinking/wondering about various things concerning the ACCH >organ... > >1 - Would it be feasible to encapsulate these new service lines in the >chambers that are making things so wet? This would be a pipe within a >pipe, >with some air space in between, and maybe a make-shift fan circulating = air >through so that moisture wouldn't want to rest there? I was thinking a >large diameter pipe could surround the service pipe and also be pitched. >Then the larger pipe would be open to the outside of the chamber at = either >end creating an effective seal to the inside of the chamber, while >retaining >the climate conditions of the outside. > >2 - Since it is so humid where the organ is, is there something beefier >that >can be put on the wooden parts to keep it safer from moisture (ie: spar >urethane or something like that)? > > That's it for now, time to go do battle with a small tracker, have a >great day! > > > -Nate > >"The apprentice" > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >   _________________________________________________________________ Instant message in style with MSN Messenger 6.0. Download it now FREE! http://msnmessenger-download.com    
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Mike Franch" <mike6514@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:55:09 -0500   Speaking of Theatre/Cinema organist, are they considered two totally separate classes of artists, other than the obvious, where Cinema Organist =   accompanied a silent film and theatre organists played in a theatre?   Mike Franch Madision, WI   _________________________________________________________________ Share your photos without swamping your Inbox. Get Hotmail Extra Storage today! http://join.msn.com/?PAGE=3Dfeatures/es    
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 11:04:04 EDT   Hi Colin:   In this mix, I really don't think Edwin H. Lemare should be forgotten. He was in his early years Organist for St. Margaret's the church parliament members attended. He had some falling out with a rector who eventually told him to "clear out". This was near or after the turn of the 20th Century. He was famous for his trans- criptions for organ. He went on tours of Australia playing on some of their largest instruments. He was Municipal Organist in several cities in the US. His playing was right in the middle of classic and orchestral. He died in 1934 and is buried in the Forest Lawn Mausoleum in Glendale, CA. some say quite near the organ loft. He made many organ rolls that can be still played today. If I'm not mistaken, some of these performances have been made available on tape and CD. I think the rolls were for the Aeolian player unit. He was one of the most highly paid for his performances at the time.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 11:45:11 -0400   Typically these convention hall organs get so little playing time.   The one in Cleveland, Ohio was back in playing shape for awhile, but it is = a union hall, so you couldn't just walk in and turn it on and play it.   It is not in use at this time, though if it is, please correct me.   Anyhow, rather than pursue getting AC playing where it is, since it would = be under the control of the hall...I think that the suggestions I have heard = about moving it make sense.   Possibly we should be brainstorming to think of a place that would have = the $ to do this and have a reason to have it.   The great popularity of the Pizza Parlors with pipes....why not go after = Disney, an organization that now understands that pipe organs of unique interest = gets them displays in magazines of people who have $, why not approach them = about opening the grandest Pizza Parlor with Pipes of all time THE WORLD's = LARGEST ORGAN at Disney World in Florida?   Since the organ is a historic monument, there should be definite tax = advantages for Mickey and his friends in restoring it and maintaining it...   noel jones        
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 11:50:02 EDT   Hi Mike:   Peterson has something in the works regarding a wireless playing action. As of last year, they were testing it on some extant organs. The effective range is less than 400 feet from the console to the source but in most places more than adequate. In ACCH the distances are greater. It would sure simplify things there, and save 137,000 miles of stranded color coded cable. The new codes would require removing the old cotton/wax covered wire used at the time. Can you imagine belling out 137,000 miles of cotton/wax wire cable. One or more of the relay rooms has been put out of commission and used for the new seating. Many of the old relays were beyond repair in the 1946 flooding so it might be wise to go with the modern micro relays and fiber optic cables. The original piston settings were set in a location far away from the console using trippers. It would be nice to have several memories settable at the console, rather than making notes and setting them on remote boards. Purists probably wouldn't like this, but it does make perfectly good sense. Nostalgia sometimes costs more, than common sense, and in this case a lot more. Perhaps a digital sample of "PLUSH" would work for these folks on each piston. :) Can you imagine voicing capabilities for "PLUSH"? How about "PLUSH" in stereo? Works for me.   On the wireless applications, I'm not sure how physical obstructions affect the performance, but I do think it has great promise.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Wicks & Hammond From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:21:49 -0400   I just installed a large 1972 Wicks in my home, and it sounds wonderful. Before I tell you all about it, I will pose the following riddle: What, = apart from building organs, do Wicks and Hammond have in common? ;-)   -WG      
(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:28:43 -0400   On 9/26/03 10:08 AM, "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote:   > Sorry Alan, I'm not with you. What have I misread ? > > A=3D440 is certainly the standard in this country. I don't know of any > other pitch in use except for some ancient instrumental groups. Some > Electronic organs have A=3D415 as an alternative to accommodate some > music which was written for that pitch, otherwise it's A-440 and has > been for over 50 years here.   Actually, Bob, you've answered your own question. You (very correctly) = use words like "except," "alternative," and "otherwise." Evidently in Australia, as in the U.S. and probably everywhere else, there are several "standards." 440 is doubtless the most common 415 for some electronics 4?? for some ancient instrumental groups And, as others have mentioned, there are higher pitch-standards in use in various symphony orchestras. And on SOME pipe organs. (Ours is 442. Sometimes.)   As for a "misread"--don't feel bad; I took it wrong too. The point, I guess, is that 440 is pretty much the majority "standard," but there just isn't anything that can be called "THE standard." (Or is that just semantics again? Perhaps.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:46:26 EDT   They both built clocks before organs-and they're from Illinois. I win! It = is actually an interesting relationship-in the 15th and 16th centuries, = organs and clocks were the most technically advanced devices-that's why so many municipal organs were built.   Gregory Ceurvorst    
(back) Subject: Haas recital SW Ontario From: "Anya/Andreas" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 04:15:10 -0400   Those of you who live north of the border may be interested in a recital = taking place this Sunday, September 28 at 3 pm. "Music for a Sunday Afternoon" presents Canadian organist Douglas Haas = in a recital of works by Bach, Buxtehude, Frescobaldi, Langlais and = Bedard. The suggested donation is $10, and reception will follow. St. = Marys United Church, in St. Marys, Ontario (about 20 min. west of = Stratford). The instrument is a III/45 Casavant, originally installed in = 1907.   Andreas Thiel Director of Music St. Marys United Church