PipeChat Digest #4020 - Friday, September 26, 2003
 
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: More happy topics.A=3D440
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
RE: Tuning Tools
  by "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net>
Re: A=3D440
  by "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Hammond Question
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: the best cinema style organist?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hammond Question
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4019 - 09/26/03
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Hammond Question
  by "REIngraham" <reingraham@stratos.net>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Organ Clearing House
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Wirless consoles
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 13:17:44 EDT   Thanks Alan:   I do carefully word my statements so that they are true in all cases. I'm glad you picked up on that. There are always those who go picky picky on what is contributed. A=3D440 is a standard by which all don't necessarily follow. If I didn't tell anybody that I retuned their organ to Vallotti well temper, probably wouldn't know I did, but their mixtures wouldn't scream, mutations would be less harsh, the reeds would have a singing quality they wouldn't be able to put their finger on, and the Principals would bloom and sing. Flutes draw into tune so they wouldn't figure prominantly either.   I did this on my pile of junk, and the result was, people said it sounded smoother, and nobody for a long time has said the organ was too loud. We didn't soften any pipes, but people commented that it sounded better. Now I can't convince a closed mind, but the ear tells a much different story especially among the uninitiated. A few can be quite = ridged in their thinking, but I stuck my neck out on the line, and was judged to be right. It's good to be right once in a while.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440 From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 09:19:54 +0100   Greetings all,   Would anyone care to speculate as to why an organ built in 1859 (in UK) should be built to A=3D440 ?. There is no sign that it was ever tuned to anything different, and any thoughts may just help to solve the mystery of why this organ was built and where it was for the first 19 years of its life. (St John's page - my website)   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: <RonSeverin@aol.com>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 1:15 AM Subject: Re: More happy topics.A=3D440     > I have no idea when A=3D440 was actually accepted universally as the > standard but I do know that the town where I lived in 1949 went A=3D440 > with its pianos in that year. I can remember the problems faced by > brass and woodwind players who had high pitch instruments, and who > had great difficulty in tuning down to the new pitch.    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 11:05:02 -0700 (PDT)   I feel like adding one correction, Wicks didn't build clocks BEFORE building organs. One of the three Wick brothers was a Swiss watchmaker, but the little pocket kinds. During World War II, Wicks shifted production several different ways since the government curtailed pipe organ building. Clocks were one of the many things that came out of the Wicks shop. If you find a Wicks organ built or rebuilt around 1946-1950 (it's not hard at all) you might find either pipe slides made out of material stamped and painted for clock faces, or camouflage material on the concussion bellows. Then company president Martin Wick served in the Army Air Corps during the war. When he returned, Wicks began making aircraft wings for trainer planes. His training and that experience led to the other Wick business still operating today, Wicks Aircraft Supply. Just a little history.   To stay on topic, Wicks has built an operational clock organ. Usually on display in the shop, I think it's somewhere in Florida right now being shown to potential customers. Brent Johnson     --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > They both built clocks before organs-and they're > from Illinois. I win! It is > actually an interesting relationship-in the 15th and > 16th centuries, organs > and clocks were the most technically advanced > devices-that's why so many > municipal organs were built. > > Gregory Ceurvorst >    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 14:21:25 -0400   You win, dawg! My Wicks is a grandfather clock. At about 5 in the = afternoon on the first day of our 1972 summer vacation I am sure my father was = planning to put another 300 miles between us and Pittsburgh, but I spotted the = Wicks sign whizzing by beside the highway and wailed until he agreed to stop for = the night. We showed up at the factory for an impromptu tour, and my parents ordered the clock before we left. That was the summer I first played the Mormon Tabernacles (the famous one in Salt Lake, and the not so famous one in Ogden), and a very good vacation!   -WG   > <Gfc234@aol.com> wrote: > > They both built clocks before organs-and they're from Illinois. I win! = It is > actually an interesting relationship-in the 15th and 16th centuries, = organs > and clocks were the most technically advanced devices-that's why so many > municipal organs were built. > > Gregory Ceurvorst    
(back) Subject: RE: Tuning Tools From: "Andr=E9s G=FCnther" <agunther@cantv.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 15:02:32 -0400   Andres Gunther agunther@cantv.net   Ron Severin wrote on pipechat:   > I wonder how many of us get on a tuning job and realize our favorite tuning implement was inadvertantly misplaced at a previous day's job. One we won't return to for six months 50 miles away. :)   I always feel like a surgeon who left an instrument inside the patient = when this happens LOL. As for "non standard tuning tools" I could tell another bunch of = anecdotes. My first home made tuning cone was of hardwood. Poor pipes. This was my "amateur stage" over 25 years ago - fortunatedly all my beginner's accidents (including trouser legs) happened in a junk organ = which was on "it-cannot-get-worse-than-it-is" status (and still works :)   1984 I started with a standard Laukhuff 3 cone set and a steel ruler as knife. The collection became complete when I found an abandoned reed = tuning knife in an organ (thee hee :)-   Over the years I developed my own tools whith optimum weight-balance for = my hands (which can vary dramatically from an individual to another!) vs no damage hazard for the pipes. Includes several tuning knives for different size / location scenarios and a miniature pen sized cone for a darn neobarroque Ultrasonic Ultracompact Zimbel III.   Cheers Andres =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet and the cat got something to wonder about.      
(back) Subject: Re: A=3D440 From: "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 20:38:27 +0200   Here is an excerpt from what the Grove Concise Dictionary of Music has to say about pitch standards.   Peter.   -------------------------------------------------------------   Evidence from between c1500 and c1800, usually in the form of surviving organs, pitch pipes or tuning forks, or from written sources, shows a variation in pitch for a' between modern f'# and c''. The pitch for opera performances in Paris in Lully's time (c1675) was a' =3D c410; this was = also the low chamber pitch ('Cammer-Ton') of J S Bach. Bach's organ pitch ('Chor-Ton') at Leipzig and Weimar, however, was a' =3D c480. Pitch levels between c415 and c430 were much used: a tuning fork associated with Handel gives a' =3D 422.5 and this is the approximate pitch of French orchestras c1700 and the 'high chamber pitch' of J S Bach. This is the pitch, too, used by the Philharmonic Society of London in 1813. In Vienna, pitch was then a' =3D 435. It rose during the 19th century as the = pressures during increasing public performance, in larger halls, led to a striving for more brilliant effect. In the 1850s, it stood at 449 at the Paris Opera and at 451 at La Scala, Milan. The rise gave particular concern to singers as the higher pitch increasingly strained their voices. A standard of a' =3D 435 was established in France in 1859.   The present standard of a' =3D 440 was laid down by the Interantional Organization for Standardization in 1955. Most performers on period instruments use a lower pitch, generally c430 for music of the Classical period and 415 for Baroque music.    
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:00:58 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Indeed Ron!   The "Danse Macabre" by Saint-Saens remains a classic of the transcriber's art.   However, I was thinking more in terms of pure cinema/theatre organists of a slightly later age.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Colin: > > In this mix, I really don't think Edwin H. Lemare > should be forgotten.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:07:02 -0700 (PDT)   Helo,   No, not really Mike.   It's just that in the UK, we refer more to Cinema Organists than Theatre Organists, who are really both the same in all but name.   Silent film accompaniment was really part of the "stock in trade" of the early exponents of the genre, but as time went on, the organists became class acts in their own rights, and very highly paid.   Sid Torch earned much the same as a top rock-star of today in real terms!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Mike Franch <mike6514@hotmail.com> wrote: > Speaking of Theatre/Cinema organist, are they > considered two totally > separate classes of artists, other than the obvious, > where Cinema Organist > accompanied a silent film and theatre organists > played in a theatre?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Hammond Question From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 14:31:42 -0500   Forgive a slightly "off topic" question about a Hammond RT-2 organ. I know there is a Hammond tech newsgroup, but I don't know how to reach it.....maybe someone can tell me, but if you have the answer to my question, you can email me directly rather than clutter this list.   I have a Hammond RT-2 organ and Hammond tone cabinet (NOT a Leslie). This instrument was stored for several years, but I resurrected it and oiled the tone wheel generator with the proper Hammond oil. It worked pretty good (except the pedal solo unit, which was dead). But recently, I started it up, and it sounded like a helicopter was landing..a rapid loud "chut, chut, chut, chut" noise. The noise is there regardless of what settings are on or off on the organ, and the volume of the noise does vary with the position of the swell pedal. Any ideas on what would cause this out of the blue?   One further bit of information......I do have cats who occasionally go in and out of the organ through the hole for the swell pedal. The tone cabinet is backless, but too close to the wall for them to get in there.   Dennis Steckley        
(back) Subject: Re: the best cinema style organist? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:33:06 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Gerald Shaw was excellent, and like John, I am an undying fan of Billy Mayerel's music.....described as the English Gershwin by many. I believe he was the pianist with the Savoy band?   Simon Gledhill is well known to me, and we worked closely together on the 40th anniversary festival of the COS. His style is unique, owing a great deal to his abilities as an accordian player and his musicianship is of a very high order indeed.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote: > organist of all time. > > For my money, Quentin Maclean must rank as one of > the > greatest - though my personal favourite is Gerald > Shaw.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:38:19 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   This is an interesting thread for me.   So far, we have had various names put forward, but as yet, scarce mention has been made of George Wright....surley the theatre organist's organist if ever there was one.   But I am surprised that greater emphasis has not been placed on technique and mastery of the instrument above all others, 'though Quentin Maclean certainly fitted that particular bill.   For my money, there is an organist alive to-day who can show a clean pair of heels to almost all others; living or dead, such is his technical prowes and musical ability.   Who might I be thinking of?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Colin: > > I don't think any one particular organist of the > cinema genre will > come out on top of the list.   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Question From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 12:50:16 -0700   (1) check the belt on the vibrato scanner ... you didn't oil THAT, did you? (grin). It's on the lower left-hand side as you face the back of the console. It could just be off or broken and rotted out.   (2) does it make the noise when the Vibrato tabs are OFF? If it only does it when the Vibrato is ON, then the Vibrato Scanner itself prolly needs replaced. We used to call it "motorboating," but "a helicopter landing" works too (grin).   (3) pedal solo units are available, and/or they can be fixed, but they're hard to fine-tune to the tonewheel pitch.   Cheers,   Bud   First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois wrote:   > Forgive a slightly "off topic" question about a Hammond RT-2 organ. I > know there is a Hammond tech newsgroup, but I don't know how to reach > it.....maybe someone can tell me, but if you have the answer to my > question, you can email me directly rather than clutter this list. > > I have a Hammond RT-2 organ and Hammond tone cabinet (NOT a Leslie). > This instrument was stored for several years, but I resurrected it and > oiled the tone wheel generator with the proper Hammond oil. It worked > pretty good (except the pedal solo unit, which was dead). But recently, > I started it up, and it sounded like a helicopter was landing..a rapid > loud "chut, chut, chut, chut" noise. The noise is there regardless of > what settings are on or off on the organ, and the volume of the noise > does vary with the position of the swell pedal. Any ideas on what would > cause this out of the blue? > > One further bit of information......I do have cats who occasionally go > in and out of the organ through the hole for the swell pedal. The tone > cabinet is backless, but too close to the wall for them to get in there. > > Dennis Steckley > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4019 - 09/26/03 From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 21:10:57 +0100 (BST)   1) Theatre Organists - I'm glad Colin and I see eye to eye over Quentin Maclean. Interestingly enough, Gerald Shaw played the Grieg Piano Concerto in a concert at the Odeon, Leicester Square some years ago - I don't remember which he recorded and which he played, though I think he recorded the organ part and played the piano part. Bob Elms asked about Nelson Elms - yes, he was organist at the Empire Leicester Square in the late 50's - the 4 manual Wurlitzer which was bought by Len Rawle. He let me play it when I was a schoolboy. My memory of him is that he was very tall. Gerald Shaw did in fact introduce me to all the organists in Leicester Square, which must in those days have had more Wurlitzer and Compton pipes within a 100 square yards or so than anywhere else in the world - except, maybe, Atlantic City?! Although Edwin Lemare was a concert organist, I don't think he would have classified himself as a cinema organist - and good entertainer and likeable person though Reginal Foort was, he said, on hearing Robinson Cleaver "I wish I could play like that." 2) Wireless consoles. Maurice Forsyth Grant, who founded the electronics firm RACAL, now Vodaphone, designed a wireless console 30 years ago. The technology was quite feasible then - it would be effortless today. He was responsible in part for military radio communications which involved rapid multi band change to avoid being overheard by the enemy. This is easily transferred to remote console control. We never had the occasion to build one, however, as G D & B had moved on to all tracker action. 3) Mmm ?? There is no third thing --- John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week :50 years ago Potage Tournemire   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Question From: "REIngraham" <reingraham@stratos.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 16:23:37 -0400   I'd check the electrolytic capacitors in the amplifier. I that's the problem, no problem replacing them and everything should be fine. Dick Ingraham   ----- Original Message ----- From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 3:31 PM Subject: Hammond Question     > Forgive a slightly "off topic" question about a Hammond RT-2 organ. I > know there is a Hammond tech newsgroup, but I don't know how to reach > it.....maybe someone can tell me, but if you have the answer to my > question, you can email me directly rather than clutter this list. > > I have a Hammond RT-2 organ and Hammond tone cabinet (NOT a Leslie). > This instrument was stored for several years, but I resurrected it and > oiled the tone wheel generator with the proper Hammond oil. It worked > pretty good (except the pedal solo unit, which was dead). But recently, > I started it up, and it sounded like a helicopter was landing..a rapid > loud "chut, chut, chut, chut" noise. The noise is there regardless of > what settings are on or off on the organ, and the volume of the noise > does vary with the position of the swell pedal. Any ideas on what would > cause this out of the blue? > > One further bit of information......I do have cats who occasionally go > in and out of the organ through the hole for the swell pedal. The tone > cabinet is backless, but too close to the wall for them to get in there. > > Dennis Steckley > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.521 / Virus Database: 319 - Release Date: 9/23/2003    
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 16:27:34 EDT   Hi Colin:   That'd be Hector Olivera Si?   Ron    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 16:01:01 -0500   Walter, They build airplane parts? Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 11:21 AM Subject: Wicks & Hammond     > I just installed a large 1972 Wicks in my home, and it sounds wonderful. > Before I tell you all about it, I will pose the following riddle: What, apart > from building organs, do Wicks and Hammond have in common? ;-) > > -WG > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Organ Clearing House From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 17:13:08 -0400   I never thought I'd ever need to know about them, but the time has come.   Got a call from a friend of a friend. Real estate fellow in Manhattan and Ithaca (home of Cornell, etc.). He recently bought a (the?) Masonic = Temple in Ithaca, and may turn it into condominiums. It contains a pipe organ (apparently 2 manuals, xx stops, c. 1924ish. More details coming on maybe Monday. He's not personally interested in the instrument as a musical instrument. He IS reputed to be a fine person, even a bit of a philanthropist. He feels it should be removed, "fixed" if it needs it, = and find a new home in a church or something. (It DOES work; he's heard it.)   He's sending me more info next week, and I think I should put him in touch with OCH. Other than that, is there more I should do?   Who can supply OCH addresses/phones/faxes/e-mail/website, etc.?   Thanks   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 14:17:30 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   At last!   Hector Olivera is the supreme technical master, and for my money, safely outperforms all-comers in the theatre organ stakes.   And yet, George Wright has, IMHO never been excelled as the absolute entertainer with the most extraordinary wit and imagination.   I can listen to recordings of both forever.   Of course, many of the other names were/are great performers and stylists who have their place in the folklore of the theatre organ.   If we were to ask the THEATRE ORGANISTS who was the best CLASSICAL organist (living or deceased), I wonder who they would agree upon?   I have an idea, but I dare not anticipate.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote: > Hi Colin: > > That'd be Hector Olivera Si?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Wirless consoles From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 14:23:25 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I am disappointed, frustrated and feel cheated!!   When I was 14 (about 30 years ago) I suggested that each control and each note of an organ could be allocated a frequency and then sent via infra-red signal or radio to a receptor/decoder.   The bastards laughed at me!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- John Foss <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > 2) Wireless consoles. Maurice Forsyth Grant, who > founded the electronics firm RACAL, now Vodaphone, > designed a wireless console 30 years ago. The > technology was quite feasible then - it would be > effortless today. He was responsible in part for > military radio communications which involved rapid > multi band change to avoid being overheard by the > enemy. This is easily transferred to remote console > control. We never had the occasion to build one, > however, as G D & B had moved on to all tracker > action.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com