PipeChat Digest #4023 - Saturday, September 27, 2003
 
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Sledmere House
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Erz=E4hler Paradise!
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
re: Hammond Question
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL)
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Can't get enough of AC
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital
  by "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
re: Hammond Question
  by "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br>
Re: AC Ideas
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
OFF-TOPIC: FREE LITURGICAL MUSIC
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
The 32' Cornet
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: AC Ideas
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
x-post Need In League
  by "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@cox.net>
Atlantic City Organ Wiring
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: Atlantic City Organ Wiring
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Atlantic City Organ Wiring
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Atlantic City Organ Wiring
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
Re: The 32' Cornet
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: The 32' Cornet
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: The 32' Cornet
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re: The 32' Cornet
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 05:36:08 EDT   In a message dated 9/26/2003 11:30:22 PM Central Daylight Time, ameagher@stny.rr.com writes: And Mozart wrote pieces for Mechanical Clock that are now playedon organ.   Andrew Yes, he certainly did.    
(back) Subject: Re: Sledmere House From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 04:01:59 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   It is interesting to hear that Binns, Fitton and Haley installed cinema organs, but no great surprise as they had adopted electro-pneumatic action after the demise of J J Binns.   I know nothing about the ex-cinema ranks at Sledmere, but I don't suppose one would know without specific knowledge, as their scales and voicing treatment were fairly standard from one installation to another.   I think that the way they built instruments was very much in the manner of, "We'll have a 5A Open with an 8B Tuba".   It's interesting that Hull had a number of unusual cinema organs, and quite a fine Compton which went to a musical museum at Rufforth eventually, but which has since been moved so far as I know. Of course, the City Hall Compton is still in the manner of a "dual purpose" instrument; having a Tibia unit and various percussion stops etc.   Hull was almost completely destroyed in WWII, and yet the huge medieval parish church remains, and with it, the equally huge Forster & Andrews/Compton instrument.   I cannot recall with any certainty, but I seem to remember that, out of 300,000 homes, more than half were destroyed by bombing; making this the English equivalent to the bombing damage wrought on Rotterdam.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Bruce Miles <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> wrote: > It is said (I forget by whom) that there are some > ranks in this organ > recovered by Binns Fitton and Haley from bombed-out > BFH theatre organs in > Hull. The Carlton cinema was mentioned. BFH only > built about ten theatre > organs, most of which went to Hull. The Sledmere > House organ was rebuilt by > BFH after being removed from the private chapel at > Dunecht House c1947 which > would be about the time that Hull was picking up the > pieces after being very > heavily bombed in WW II.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Erz=E4hler Paradise! From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 08:25:40 -0400   Good morning!   I am revealing to the PipeChat public today that I am a Erz=E4hler nut. = I love the Erz=E4hler! So, when it was raining cats and dogs outside this = past week, I got to tune the Aeolian-Skinner at the new, err, 50 year old (the moved from another spot) Church of the Redeemer in New Haven.   This particular organ is unique in many ways. For one it has a one-off recorder-board style combination action. BUT ALSO, there are ranks that = are borrowed a LOT on this organ. And, because of the way they are borrowed, they do not couple inter or intra-manual. (You have to pull out it's stop on whatever manual/pedal you want)   That being said, this organ has a Erz=E4hler that is available in 16' = 8' and 4'. Now naturally when I had a minute at the console you can predict what I did. I had all three Erzahlers going, 16', 8', and 4'. But THEN I pulled on the Kleiner Erz=E4hler and sub/octave coupled it so there was a = one for one undulant pipe for regular pipe. The result was so absolutely wonderful that had I been able to play any longer I would have had to have been squeegeed off the floor. (C:   So, pull out the ole Erz=E4hler once for me this weekend! (C:   = -Nate   "The Erz=E4hler Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: re: Hammond Question From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:43:18 -0300   I don't undestand nothing about this, but I'd like to say I have the complete service manual of all Hammond models. If you want, I can write some parts of your interests. I may scan the table of contents.   Regards, Domitila Ballesteros      
(back) Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 20:49:08 +0800   Lemare was not a theatre organist. He was a consummate player of transcriptions. If you include him you must pay regard to the contemporary Thos. Heywood who also is am marvellous arranger and player of transcriptions. Bob Elms   ---- Original Message ---- From: ameagher@stny.rr.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: The best organist? (Straw POLL) Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 00:25:12 -0400   >Lemare was great, but was he really a theatre organist? I don't >think he >totally fits the catergory.    
(back) Subject: Can't get enough of AC From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 08:53:52 -0400   Morning again chatters,   You know, maybe the wireless console would be a great thing to test out on the 5-manual console. (C: I definitely agree on the secure digital as the way to go with wireless. = 2 nights ago someone was operating something and my bedroom ceiling fan had = a mind of it's own. On, off, lights on, lights off. We slept in the living room that night. I'd hate to see something like that happen during a big concert!   Maybe to raise interest in AC we could brand the Grand Ophecleide name and use it for all sorts of wonderful things. (C: Imagine devices in = your home being able to re-create the power and majesty of the Grand = Ophecleide! (C: 100 inches of raw power now available in the Grand Ophecleide Doorbell, Kitchen Timer, Telephone, Car Horn, and for you non-morning = folks like me, Alarm Clock! (C:   For those of you who are really worried at this point I was just joking.   At any rate, if AC needs rewiring let me know the specs on the cables, I'll whip them up and have them fanned out and laced in no time. (C:   For all of you AC CD owners Nate's favorite tracks are 8 and 10.   = -Nate   "The Flying-Fingers Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital From: "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:01:49 -0400   >One poster remarked that sending MIDI information wirelessly could be >catastrophic because any lost "note off" information would lead to = cacophony.   It would lead to ciphers, a problem I once had because of a bad MIDI = cable.   When I suggested MIDI over wireless, I glossed over the details. I would = use TCP/IP as a transport for MIDI data, which is probably what Peterson is = doing, or very close to what they're doing. This would guarantee message = delivery, and it would also be easier, since the IP transport is off the shelf.   Dick  
(back) Subject: re: Hammond Question From: "Domitila Ballesteros" <dballesteros@uol.com.br> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 10:09:07 -0300   I don't undestand nothing about this, but I'd like to say I have the complete service manual of all Hammond models . If you want, I can write some parts of your interests. I may scan the table of contents.   Regards, Domitila Ballesteros        
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:30:47 -0400   >Purists probably wouldn't like this, but it does make perfectly good = sense.<   I think it does. I mean, the combination action has been dead since = 1944 and didn't work much at all prior to that. I assume that it is = just a mass of "sodden wood and metal" at this point.   If one were to re-build the combination machines I would think silver = contacts (or lapping) would be in order. It's too bad that wax/cotton = wire is outlawed there, and thanks to the chopping of huge cables it's = going to make a lot of extra work that no one really needed.   If someone wants to slip me one of the traces/jacks/motors I can crank = a couple thousand out. (C:   = -Nate = "The Apprentice"  
(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC: FREE LITURGICAL MUSIC From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 06:37:25 -0700   Since this is off-topic, I asked the listowner's permission before posting it.   I have the following available in PDF or Sibelius files:   THE PROPER OF THE MASS - texts from The American Missal / Palmer's Plainchant Gradual (Elizabethan English)   Proper of the Time, Proper of the Saints (Major Holy Days), Common of the Saints (those used on Major Holy Days) - Introits, Graduals, Alleluias, Tracts, Sequences, Offertories, Communions -- available in the following forms:   (1) the original Gregorian melodies, modern notation, English text, no organ accompaniment - most of the Communions, some of the Introits, a few of the Graduals, Alleluias, Tracts and Offertories   (2) Simple modal settings for SATB choir, organ ad lib - most of the Introits, Graduals, Alleluias, Tracts, and Communions   (3) SATB fauxbourdons, alternating with the solemn versions of the Psalm-Tones -- most of the Introits, Graduals, Alleluias, and Tracts   (4) Simple "composed" settings (available in unison, SA, SAB, and SATB) - all of the Offertories, some of the Communions.       GRADUAL PSALMS for the USA Episcopal Book of Common Prayer, 1979 (modern English)   Year C - in progress ... I'm somewhere in Epiphanytide, so they'll be available in plenty of time for Advent 2003 - SATB fauxbourdons (Viadana, Roff, others) alternating with Gregorian psalmody and simple Gregorian Responds       INTROITS AND (SEASONAL) GRADUALS/ALLELUIAS for Lutheran Worship (Missouri Synod, 1980)   Gregorian antiphons, fauxbourdon psalmody, polyphonic alleluias - complete; now being engraved       GRADUAL PSALMS for Lutheran Worship   new commission; I've just begun Year C ... they will be available in plenty of time for Advent 2003       RENAISSANCE MOTETS AND HYMNS IN ENGLISH (editions)   A selection of motets and Office Hymns (Gregorian alternating with polyphony) for Advent, Christmas, Lent, Passiontide, and Holy Week; the rest of the year is "in progress" -- all Elizabethan English texts       HOLY WEEK   complete Manual for SATB choir (American Missal translation); includes the Mandatum (Foot-washing) Antiphons for Maundy Thursday set to the original Gregorian melodies ... I'm not aware of those being available elsewhere       OCCASIONAL LITURGIES - SATB   Candlemas   Ash Wednesday   Dedication of a Church   Burial Office, Requiem, Absolutions, Graveside Service   Burial of a Child       MASSES (editions)   Mass IX (Gregorian, modern notation, with accompaniment)   Mass of the Quiet Hour - George Oldroyd (string quartet ad lib)   Missa Pastorale - Pietro Yon (woodwind quartet ad lib)   Missa Pro Defunctis - Claudio Casciolini / Matteo Asola - English text       MISC.   Phos hilaron - Clark - SATB Phos hilaron - Arkangelsky - SSAATB   Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis - Tones 1, 2, 4, 8 - Gregorian alternating with renaissance polyphony - English text ... more in preparation   Psalter - SATB fauxbourdons alternating with Gregorian psalm-tones, noted in full - (Coverdale / Elizabethan) English texts - the Evening Psalter for Sundays of Advent and Lent       Just ask (grin) ... if I don't HAVE it, I can probably WRITE it. Donations cheerfully accepted but not necessary. I'd rather the music be SUNG and PRESERVED.   Cheers,   Bud                          
(back) Subject: The 32' Cornet From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:40:45 -0400   > Regarding the 32' Cornet that Nate recently encountered   I looked up the Grand Cornet in Irwin's book yesterday. It didn't list the 32' series specifically but it did mention the Manual 16' series as comprised of 8', 5-1/3', 4', 3-1/5', and 2-2/3'. Whether or not this is what the Bridgeport organ used I will have to confirm next time but it sounds right (Because of the Tierce).   Reference to this stop may be found at: http://www.organstops.org/g/GrandCornet.html     Best Wishes,   Nate   "The Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 08:50:21 -0500   > >Purists probably wouldn't like this, but it does make perfectly good = sense.< > > I think it does. I mean, the combination action has been dead >since 1944 and didn't work much at all prior to that. I assume that >it is just a mass of "sodden wood and metal" at this point. > > If one were to re-build the combination machines I would think >silver contacts (or lapping) would be in order. It's too bad that >wax/cotton wire is outlawed there, and thanks to the chopping of >huge cables it's going to make a lot of extra work that no one >really needed.   The combination action was/is in the basement of the building and takes up several rooms down there. All of this was flooded in 1944 and it all stopped working then. As i understand, it was never really successful in the first place. It is very similar to the original combination action on the Wanamaker organ which as I understand wasn't very successful either.   The only way to go at this point both for the combination action and for the actual relay system is to go with one of the newer computer operated systems. The relays are HUGE and take up too much space and yes, the whole organ will need to be rewired anyway. The cables coming out of the console Kiosk and down into the blower room are huge affairs. Just pulling out all the old cables and selling them for the scrap copper might go a long way towards restoring the organ <G> And the use of a "distributed" computerized relay will simplify the whole rewiring process.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 08:51:12 -0500   Good Morning, PipeChatters: The digital console control systems have taken a tremendous leap in the states of the art over the past 15 years. The reloability of a digital console and organ control system has been in place long enough now that we can begin to empirically observe the long-trends of these devices. Musicom, Ltd., of jolly ole England (Bideford, Devon in U.K.) makes a very reliable console and organ control system. These systems were spun off the original ideas developed as part of the Bradford Project in the early 1980s. Tony Koorlander can provide more history, if you need that. There are literally thousands of organs now using the Complete Organ Control System by Musicom. Based on my initial understanding of the specifications of the Atlantic City organs, it is highly likely that a Musicom Complete Organ Control System would handle the tasks quite well. They would not be cheap, but far less than replacement of those huge interconnecting cables required in the originals. All data is shipped from the console computer(s) via high-speed digital to the pipe controllers. This is done by a single digital cable in most modern organs; the Atlantci City organ might take a few small cable to go to the various divisions, but that would still be a tremendous reduction in bulk from what is presently required. As I say this, given the challenge to do so, the task might be well within the grasp of SSL (also from jolly ole England), Peterson of the U.S.A., Classic Organworks of Ontario, etc. The technology is here. Let not the nay-sayers prevail on this question. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:06:15 -0500   Ooops!!! Good Morning, again, PipeChatters: My previous post was to assure those who know little of nothing of the mature, modern digital controls systems that the technology assumes first and foremost that this control system is not to be affected adversely by outside influences. Those are common sense assumptions that the various builders make when designing such a system. However, on the subject of MIDI, from the "git-go" that concept is way too slow to work on such a large project(s) as the Atlantic City organ(s). While a more recent version of MIDI has been proposed, the vast quantity of data that must be transmitted to so many different places requires a high-speed digital control system that is totally dedicated to the business of getting the right notes at the right time to wherever they are needed to make the music. Also, the same is true of the ON/OFF functions of stops, and the variables of the swell shoes to the shutters. If we digitize the Atlantic City organ(s), let it be done with one of the more modern specialized system that are not limited to the MIDI specs, as that system is much too slow. What MIDI might prove to be useful as an anciliary system to record and playback the playing of the organist(s). Perhaps this organ, more than many, would benefit from a proper recording and sequencing system for the organists benefit. Then, after the concert by the organist, the MIDI file may be inserted in the player, and another set of visitors could hear the various pieces, ...exactly as they were played in the original concert. That, folks, could be exciting.   We don't replace the organist, but we can let him entertain again without having to be present in body and mind. Think about it. These are all good ideas. F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..  
(back) Subject: x-post Need In League From: "Dennis Goward" <dlgoward@cox.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:34:03 -0700   Can anyone help a poor, old parish organist?   Last year I bought a copy of "In League with our Lord", from Concordia. = It's a hymn written for the Lutheran Women's Missionary League, and they = like to sing it on LWML Sunday, which is a week from tomorrow. Anyway, = I just finished rearranging all my music, and I can't find it. Does = anyone have a copy they could loan me for a week?   Thanks.   Dennis Goward    
(back) Subject: Atlantic City Organ Wiring From: <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 13:19:03 EDT   Having recently done a little reading up on the ACCHO I have often noted = the "135,000 miles" of wire allegely involved in the organ......Come on......a =   little 8th grade math here...figure about 450 ranks ranks at an average 73 = notes per rank. The furthest chamber is about 250 feet from the console....so QUADRUPLE that number to take into consideration relays etc....my math = shows 32,850,000 FEET...divide by 5280..... a shade over 6221 miles.......Am I = missing something here????? Regards Dick Siegel    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organ Wiring From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 13:39:15 -0400   Dear Dick, I remember reading a statistic about the ACCC organ that it had = 33,000 speaking pipes and the wiring in it would go around the equator 2 = 1/2 times. That was in 1955. I don;t know if the person making that = claim was knowledgeable but I do remember those figures even at age 62. Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: RSiegel920@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2003 1:19 PM Subject: Atlantic City Organ Wiring     Having recently done a little reading up on the ACCHO I have often = noted the "135,000 miles" of wire allegely involved in the = organ......Come on......a little 8th grade math here...figure about 450 = ranks ranks at an average 73 notes per rank. The furthest chamber is = about 250 feet from the console....so QUADRUPLE that number to take into = consideration relays etc....my math shows 32,850,000 FEET...divide by = 5280..... a shade over 6221 miles.......Am I missing something = here????? Regards Dick Siegel  
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organ Wiring From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 14:09:24 EDT   In a message dated 9/27/2003 1:43:14 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RSiegel920@aol.com writes:     >   well, figure that there is about 1/4 mile of magnet wire in each magnet in =   the organ...that adds a few miles eh?   Rick in VA    
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organ Wiring From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 14:25:34 EDT   Not to mention the added wiring just in the relays. I would think that the =   cables from the chests must go to a relay, at least for all the unit = chests. There is a fair amount of wiring involved in the unified switching Then add the wiring for the super and sub couplers and combination action Steve Baltimore  
(back) Subject: Re: The 32' Cornet From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 14:26:46 EDT   You will find that the Irwin book is essentially useless, and more fictional fantasy than any type of true scholarship. There are thousands of books on organbuilding, in dozens of languages, =   published in the past several hundred years, which contain more reliable information. The Organ Historical Society Archives contain exhaustive = holdings. University libraries can sometimes surprise you with what is on their = shelves, too. Go back into the archives of PipOrg-L and PipeChat, and you will find many, many discussions of 32' and 64' cornets, some of which have been = designed and executed by list member organbuilders. Such compound voices are at their least effective when they are used = only in the bottom octave, and are allegedly supposed to "take over" from the Pedal reed at 16'. As a bit of a tangent, resultant basses do not work if = the pipes are split into C and C-sharp sides; the tones never have the chance = to interact with each other properly. There is still debate as to whether = these are psycho-acoustical phenomena, or physical phenomena.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City ..  
(back) Subject: Re: The 32' Cornet From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 15:05:09 -0400   "You will find that the Irwin book is essentially useless..."   Can you also predict lottery mnumbers? There are a lot of us out there = who could use the money. In fact it could be used to restore the Atlantic = City Organ...   Irwin's book has led many to and understanding of the organ...don't knock = it until you've gone to the trouble of writing your own.   noel jones      
(back) Subject: Re: The 32' Cornet From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 12:44:57 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   ALL resultants are psycho-musical phenomenon.   The brain picks up on the actual harmonics and "re-invents" it; exactly the same way that the 32ft Cornet works.   Now Sebastian claims that the 32ft Cornet is ineffective, but has he ever heard a Compton version I wonder?   They are SO effective as to almost make a 32ft reed redundant.........certainly the smooth Trombone type anyway.   The combined 16ft Bombarde and 32ft Cornet at St.Bride's, Fleet Street in London, is incredibly effective, and really quite convincing as a mock 32ft reed, but sounds best when the 16ft Open Wood is drawn also.   Also, the best resultant I ever came across has the pitches of 16ft and 21.2/3ft rather than 10.2/3ft, but even that was a lot less convicning than a Compton Polyphone and the 32ft Cornet I mentioned.   Lest we forget, difference tones are very real musical and psychological phenomena which caused great interest during the 19th century in German organ building.   Clever man John Compton!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK --- TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Such compound voices are at their least > effective when they are used only > in the bottom octave, and are allegedly supposed to > "take over" from the > Pedal reed at 16'. As a bit of a tangent, resultant > basses do not work if the > pipes are split into C and C-sharp sides; the tones > never have the chance to > interact with each other properly. There is still > debate as to whether these are > psycho-acoustical phenomena, or physical phenomena.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 16:23:16 -0400   > We don't replace the organist, but we can let him > entertain again without having to be present in > body and mind. Think about it. These are all good > ideas.     That sounds great. I have seen devices emerging that support the new "mLAN" standard, would that be fast enough?   = -Nate   "The Low-Tech Apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re: The 32' Cornet From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 16:25:38 EDT   I never, ever said that the 32' cornet was ineffective. Never. Why bother to quote somebody and THEN, in the same post, distort what they =   wrote?   And my apologies regarding the Irwin book. I have now been informed that it is a great work of scholarship, and = that it is the critically important key to the restoration of the Midmer-Losh organ in the Atlantic City Convention Hall. I can sleep easily. Despite the fact that it is riddled with serious and obvious factual errors (I suppose to balance the absence of important information) we MUST = regard it as authoritative until somebody else writes. Keep in mind, however, that the errors will be errors, and the = omissions omissions, no matter how many subsequent texts are, or are not, published. = In the mean time, we must give credit to his editors and the scholarly circle = of his organbuilding and historian friends who he credits with fact-checking.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 16:30:28 -0400   Hello again chatters,   By the way, I think the ACCH Organ would be a great "Poster Organ" for = a hi-tech company to strut their stuff and get some great publicity for = both! (C:   = -Nate   "The Apprentice"