PipeChat Digest #4026 - Sunday, September 28, 2003
 
Re: Compton Polyphone
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: The 32' Cornet
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
RE: The 32' Cornet
  by "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@msn.com>
Re: AC Ideas
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: OFF-TOPIC: Re: Hymn Survey
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: AC Ideas
  by "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Hymn Survey
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Sledmere House and Hull organs
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Cats in the Organ
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Favorite Hymns
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Clock that clergyman!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Hymn Survey
  by "Mark Gustus" <MGustus@msn.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Compton Polyphone From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 06:30:44 -0500   There is also a diagram of a Compton Cube although with the explanation taken from Reginald Whitworth's 1930 book "The Electric Organ" on the PipeChat web site - http://www.pipechat.org/ComptonCube/   Based on what I have read Compton used two of them at times - one for 32' C on up to F and the other from F# to B   David    
(back) Subject: Re: The 32' Cornet From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 21:41:55 -0400       We have wired a pedal grand cornet in several organs in recent years. We usually wire tham off of the biggest 16' Bourdon available. We have two out there that produce a more belly-and-building shaking 32' sound than the brand new Walker digital 32's installed in the same instruments!!       jim       On Sat, 27 Sep 2003 09:40:45 -0400 "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> writes: > > Regarding the 32' Cornet that Nate recently encountered > > I looked up the Grand Cornet in Irwin's book yesterday. It > didn't list > the 32' series specifically but it did mention the Manual 16' series > as > comprised of 8', 5-1/3', 4', 3-1/5', and 2-2/3'. Whether or not > this is > what the Bridgeport organ used I will have to confirm next time but > it > sounds right (Because of the Tierce). > > Reference to this stop may be found at: > http://www.organstops.org/g/GrandCornet.html > > > Best Wishes, > > Nate > > "The Apprentice" > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: RE: The 32' Cornet From: "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@msn.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 08:09:07 -0400   Our church is in the middle of adding to & renovating our 1968 Moller. We are so pleased with our two 32' pedal resultants (one of which is a "bourdon-induced" grand cornet 32') that we have opted to retain them = rather than replace them with digital voices.   If it ain't broke, don't fix it!   Mark L. Hopper Associate Minister of Music and Organist The First Baptist Church 205 West Winder Street PO Box 75 Henderson, NC 27536 (O) 252-438-3172 (H) 252-492-6774 (F) 252-438-3710 markhopper@ncol.net    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 20:29:02 +0800   I mentioned in a previous posting an organ in Perth West Australia which had a fibre optic cable. It, of course uses a multiplex system quite successfully. However this is NOT wireless control. Bob Elms.   ---- Original Message ---- From: mcfarland6@juno.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: AC Ideas Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 20:14:16 -0400   >Classic Organ Works has had a fully multi-plexed system up, running, >and >debugged for 15 years or more. It has been available through Klann, >and >is used by Austin and other major builders as well as a host of >smaller >builders such as my firm. It is reliable, proven, and could handle >this >job easily. A single 1/4" data cable to each basic chamber area is >all >that would be required. > >Jim >SDG Organs > >on Severin    
(back) Subject: RE: OFF-TOPIC: Re: Hymn Survey From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 20:30:56 +0800   Well done, Bud. I wish our ministers would keep a list like these! Bob   ---- Original Message ---- From: quilisma@cox.net To: pipechat@pipechat.org, Subject: RE: OFF-TOPIC: Re: Hymn Survey Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 17:33:38 -0700   >I just happen to keep a list of "Moldy Oldies" (grin), to make sure >I >hit ALL of them at least once a year ... numbers refer to the >(American) >Episcopal Hymnal, 1940: > >The Moldy Oldies > >P - processional >S - sequence >C - communion >R - recessional > >There=3Ds a Wideness In God=3Ds Mercy - 304 S or R >Thou Didst Leave Thy Throne - 321 ? >O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing - 325, 2nd P >In The Hour Of Trial - 334 C >In The Cross Of Christ I Glory - 336 C >When I Survey The Wondrous Cross - 337 C >O Lamb Of God, Still Keep Me - 339 C >Beneath The Cross Of Jesus - 341 C >Fairest Lord Jesus - 346, 2nd C >O Saviour, Precious Saviour - 349 R >Crown Him With Many Crowns - 352 P >All Hail The Power Of Jesus=3D Name - 355, 1st R >Golden Harps Are Sounding - 359 S, maybe >When Morning Gilds The Skies - 367 P >Come, Holy Spirit, Heavenly Dove - 369 C >Breathe On Me, Breath Of God - 375, 2nd C >I Love Thy Kingdom, Lord - 388 P or R >Rise, Crowned With Light - 389, 1st P or R >Faith Of Our Fathers - 393 P >The Church=3Ds One Foundation - 396 P >O Jesus, Thou Art Standing - 407 C >Take My Life, And Let It Be - 408 S >Just As I Am - 409, 3rd C >Jesus, My Saviour, Look On Me - 412 C >O For A Closer Walk With God - 416, 2nd C? >What A Friend We Have In Jesus - 422 P, C, R >Jesus, And Shall It Ever Be - 423 P >I Heard The Voice Of Jesus Say - 424, 1st P, C >He Leadeth Me - 426 R >Lead, Kindly Light - 430, 2nd C >Lead Us, O Father - 433, 2nd P >Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah - 434 ( Welsh tune) R >Dear Lord And Father Of Mankind - 435, 2nd C >I Need Thee Ev=3Dry Hour - 438, 1st C >My Faith Looks Up To Thee C >O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go - 458, 2nd C >Jesus, The Very Thought Of Thee - 462, 2nd P, C >Thou Hidden Love Of God, Whose Height - 464 P, R >Nearer, My God, To Thee - 465 C >Abide With Me - 467 P, C >Rock Of Ages - 471, 2nd P, C >Hark, Hark My Soul - 472 P, C >Come, Ye Disconsolate - 483 P, C >Lift Up Your Heads - 484 P >Saviour, Again To Thy Dear Name We Raise - 487 R >Lord, Dismiss Us - 489, 1st R >God Be With You Till We Meet Again - 490 ( old tune) R >Blest Be The Tie That Binds - 495, 2nd R >God Of Grace And God Of Glory - 783 R >Rise Up, O Men Of God - 535 P, R >Christ For The World We Sing - 537 P >Soon May The Last Glad Song Arise - 539, 2nd S >Jesus Shall Reign - 542 P >Am I A Soldier Of The Cross - 550 P >Onward, Christian Soldiers - 557 R >Stand Up, Stand Up For Jesus - 562 R >How Firm A Foundation - 564 R >Jesus Calls Us - 566, 2nd P >On Our Way Rejoicing - 568 R >Rejoice, Ye Pure In Heart - 579, 2nd R > >Cheers, > >Bud > > > > > > > > >David Evangelides wrote: > >> I play hymns several times a week at 2 or more senior centers. >Although >> being in church for 50+ years, my objectivity in selections may be >muddied. >> >> There are several lists of 'Favorite Hymns', the sources of which >may be >> varied. I would like to propose a survey of what subscribers to >this >> list feel are Favorite Hymns of themselves, and of their >congregations. >> >> There are no incorrect answers. 'Enter' as often as a song comes >to >> mind, and I'll tabulate them in alphabetical order. >> >> Thanks, >> >> David E >> >> David G. Evangelides >> Fulfillment Manager >> International Bible Society >> Colorado Springs. CO >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> >> >> > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related >topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 20:34:04 +0800   Ron, hold your horses! Surely I can comment without you taking it personally? You talked of rewiring. Would you rewire wthout going solid state? I hope not. Nothing personal Ron. Bob.     ---- Original Message ---- From: RonSeverin@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Wireless Consoles - Going Digital Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 23:05:32 EDT   >Bob: > >I've just got to make this comment. I've never known a person >more than willing to mix apples and oranges. The #22 wire comment >was for old style relays with a great distance to travel. I wasn't >even considering solid state and I think you knew that. You split >hairs just to split hairs it seems, so you seem to always be right. >What had my wire comment to do with solid state? Nothing! >We are talking about 1920's technology. Solid state didn't become >a reality for nearly 50 years after, unless Orson Wells visited >Emerson Richards with his time machine. :) > >Ron Severin >    
(back) Subject: Re: AC Ideas From: "F Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 09:37:47 -0500   Good Morning, Bob, et al:   You wrote:   > I mentioned in a previous posting an organ in Perth West Australia > which had a fibre optic cable. It, of course uses a multiplex system > quite successfully. However this is NOT wireless control.   Let's review the options for transmission of keying and control signals from the console to the pipes:   1. As originally built, one wire for each function. This is insulated copper and carries the current for activating the relative actions in the pipes. Later updates used the same concept, but had better insulation on the wires. We are all familiar with telephone-type wiring, so won't belabor that discussion.   2. Analog keyers or diode matrix keyers. These were later developments (1950s-1960s), but they were esentially smaller scale ways to achieve the original concepts of wiring with double-cotton-covered (DCC) copper. The difference was that the analog keyers or diode matrix keyers moved very small current to activate solid state switches that conducted the the heavier currents required for action units. These concepts became the proving technologies for what developed in more recent technologies. The keying and controls signals were sent via FormVar wire cables (magnet wire insulated with a coating of enamel or other suitable insulation), which was a significant reduction in the bulk of cables.   3. Digital keyers and digital control devices. These may be discrete devices on each end of the link between console and pipes, but the data is transmitted at high speed in serial or parallel streams. Parallel data streams used cables that were a bit more complex. Serial was usually a single conductor (not necessarily so; but you get the idea) that conducted the data stream to devices that decoded the information at the pipes. The resulting decoding process activated devices that switched the heavier current at the pipes. All this happens in near-realtime with changes in keying states arriving hundreds of times per second, ...if not thousands of times per second.   4. Many of the present-day systems are a bit more complex in that they are essentially computing devices. Some are based on a PC concept; maybe because the modern PC is so easy to get. Everything about this approach must be programmed to function within the computer to duplicate the traditional keyers and control functions that operated by switches ever since electricity was introduced into the organ.   HOWEVER, the PC is a high-speed computational device, and this is where the 21st century begins to get interesting.   High-speed computational computers are different from realtime computers. You can build realtime computers to duplicate the traditional switching of keyers and control systems with readily available components that have been in production for decades, and portend to continue in production as long as there is a market for realtime process and control of all kinds of modern machinery and systems.   Judge for yourself if your PC processor will be in production in five years. The very stable production devices for realtime processors have been in production for more than 20 years and portend a future well into the 21st Century. The concepts for building realtime processors and control systems are well established and the parts have become the electrical/electrnic equivalent of nuts, bolts, screws, etc., of the mechanical world.   5. Connecting the various portions of a realtime system can be done with "all of the above" suggestions that have come up on this forum in the past two weeks: infra-red, radio-frequency, fiber-optic, hard-wire cable, each crafted to the precise transmission job for the Atlantic City organ(s). The technologies are already in place to do this. We only have to adapt the devices on each end of the transmission links to the job to be done.   Oh, lest I forget, this is a two-way transmission job. The keying and control SENT from the console often need complementary function status signals back from the pipes to operate indicators on the console. In my mind, the cable/transmission media will always need more than one "wire," but those need not be more bulky that a well protected bundle the size of your index finger. After all, if a cable is used, you do not want someone stomping it with a clumsy foot misplaced at the most inopportune moment before a concert.   Just my thoughts this beautiful morning.   F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs     ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Survey From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 10:27:17 -0500   My dad enrolled me in piano lessons at the age of 6, and once I got proficient he finally had a church pianist who could play the hymns he liked. He went through 25-30 years as a music director in a Baptist church without a musician who could play most hymns in the book, so every time I visited his church or played for a revival, he would pull out the following, among others (can't remember all the tune names now):   He keeps me singing Saved! Saved! (with the waltz-like accompaniment) When we all get to heaven (in 5 flats - he liked to make the women work) Trusting Jesus (my mother's favorite hymn) I stand amazed in the presence Were you there (in the key of E) Stand up, stand up for Jesus (key of A) When the roll is called up yonder Standing on the promises   He seemed to like hymns in the key of A-flat - maybe because his accompanist couldn't read in that key. He was also thrilled that I could play in any key, so we didn't transpose that much in my childhood days, although I was happy to see that other hymnals pitched the music more singer-friendly.   Now that I'm a reprobate renegade Episcopalian and former organist, some of my previous congregation's favorite general hymns (I'm trying to exclude seasonal, even though several listed are), which also happened to become some of my favorites, included (tune names only are given when there was more than one set of words that we used):   Lasst uns erfreuen* Ye holy angels bright (Darwall's 148th)(St. Michaelmas)* Praise, my soul, the King of heaven (Lauda anima) Cwm Rhondda Joyful, joyful, we adore thee (Hymn to joy)* Holy, holy, holy! (Nicaea)(Trinity)* Moscow (Trinity)* Rustington (Advent/Trinity) Ton-y-Botel Hanover Hyfrydol There's a wideness in God's mercy (Beecher; tune used in my childhood to "Love divine, all loves excelling")* Crown him with many crowns (Diademata)(Ascension/Christ the King)* Christ is made the sure foundation (Westminster Abbey) Glorious things of thee are spoken (Austria)* Come, labor on (Ora labora) Jesus shall reign (Duke Street)* A mighty fortress (Ein feste Burg)* How firm a foundation (both tunes)* Now, my tongue, the mystery telling (Grafton)(Maundy Thursday) Leoni   *sung by the Baptists too, but sometimes to different words (example Darwall's - I believe that was "Rejoice, ye pure in heart")   Some that I liked but they never cared much for (guess they were too hard to sing):   St. Agatha's Hymn (Deo gracias) Jerusalem Salve festiva dies (too hard to keep up with the verses) (and of course, Bud, the fateful Healey Willan Gloria, per the priest who banned it)   I loved a great number of hymns that no one sang, so I used them to weave into the theme at prelude, communion, and other times, putting a reference to them in the bulletin to encourage people to read the words). If I had had a choir, I'd have used them in that way too.   Bud's list brings back memories of the elderly congregation (all passed on now) when I played at St. A's just before going off to law school, and we still had the 1940 hymnal. We sang just about all of the ones he listed, but I left their favorites on the list. I didn't check his tunes, because we would sing them to more than one tune.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of quilisma@cox.net   There's a Wideness In God=3Ds Mercy - 304 S or R O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing - 325, 2nd P In The Cross Of Christ I Glory - 336 C When I Survey The Wondrous Cross - 337 C Beneath The Cross Of Jesus - 341 C Fairest Lord Jesus - 346, 2nd C Crown Him With Many Crowns - 352 P All Hail The Power Of Jesus' Name - 355, 1st R When Morning Gilds The Skies - 367 P Faith Of Our Fathers - 393 P The Church's One Foundation - 396 P What A Friend We Have In Jesus - 422 P, C, R He Leadeth Me - 426 R Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah - 434 ( Welsh tune) R Dear Lord And Father Of Mankind - 435, 2nd C I Need Thee Every Hour - 438, 1st C My Faith Looks Up To Thee C Nearer, My God, To Thee - 465 C Abide With Me - 467 P, C Lift Up Your Heads - 484 P God Of Grace And God Of Glory - 783 R Christ For The World We Sing - 537 P Jesus Shall Reign - 542 P Onward, Christian Soldiers - 557 R Stand Up, Stand Up For Jesus - 562 R How Firm A Foundation - 564 R Jesus Calls Us - 566, 2nd P On Our Way Rejoicing - 568 R Rejoice, Ye Pure In Heart - 579, 2nd R          
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2003 12:54:15 +0100   Just a 'Two-penny' worth ..   Many factories produce on 'parallel' tracks - it's what keeps 'em in business - so they're still there when you want the original product. One fairly 'local' factory I had something to do within the past, was the 'Birmingham Stopper and Cycle Component Company'. Once, asking the MD, what a 'Stopper' was, and he'd "forgotten", he called to oldest employee to his office and asked him! Apparently, a 'Stopper' was the bent metal wires that held a re-placeable pop-bottle top 'in place' ... remember, they were once on Cola bottles (without mentioning brands). They hadn't made any since the Second World War - but the company name was registered at Company's House - and the name had stuck ! .... even though they were now dedicated to aero-space components !   I wonder if Wicks might fit a time-piece into their consoles - now that WOULD be a useful accessory for the working organist !   Harry Grove [a.k.a. musicman]   -----Original Message----- From: Gary Black <gblack@ocslink.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 26 September 2003 22:05 Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond     >Walter, They build airplane parts? Gary      
(back) Subject: Re: Sledmere House and Hull organs From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:28:26 +0100   Greetings all,   I didn't get this quite right - six organs were built for Hull cinemas by Fitton and Hayley in the 1920s and eight for elsehwere. After JJ Binn's death in 1929, when the firm became Binns, Fitton and Hayley one of the Hull organs was rebuilt and went to York and three others were built for cinemas elsewhere.   The ex Astoria Hull Compton is still in situ at Rufforth. I helped to install it 1989/90 and was the last to play it after the failure of the museum in 1995. It has (or had then) a working Solo Cello. This organ was a delight to play with a = lightning-fast response and a very fine Tuba and Trumpet- also the usual 32ft synthetic Accoustic Bass, (Cornet or Mixture, call it what you will) just for the bottom pedal octave - the rest was Tuba. It was just about tolerable with full organ but otherwise pretty awful. The all-electric action was = original with setter piston.   The Hull Parish Church organ has a Compton illuminated push-push stop-knob console whilst the City Hall organ, in spite of being rebuilt by Compton = and having Tibia etc added, has conventional draw knobs.   Regards,   Bruce Miles     website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2003 12:01 PM Subject: Re: Sledmere House     > Hello, > > It is interesting to hear that Binns, Fitton and Haley > installed cinema organs, but no great surprise as they > had adopted electro-pneumatic action after the demise > of J J Binns. > > I know nothing about the ex-cinema ranks at Sledmere, > but I don't suppose one would know without specific > knowledge, as their scales and voicing treatment were > fairly standard from one installation to another. > > I think that the way they built instruments was very > much in the manner of, "We'll have a 5A Open with an > 8B Tuba". > > It's interesting that Hull had a number of unusual > cinema organs, and quite a fine Compton which went to > a musical museum at Rufforth eventually, but which has > since been moved so far as I know. Of course, the City > Hall Compton is still in the manner of a "dual > purpose" instrument; having a Tibia unit and various > percussion stops etc. > > Hull was almost completely destroyed in WWII, and yet > the huge medieval parish church remains, and with it, > the equally huge Forster & Andrews/Compton instrument. > > I cannot recall with any certainty, but I seem to > remember that, out of 300,000 homes, more than half > were destroyed by bombing; making this the English > equivalent to the bombing damage wrought on Rotterdam. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 12:44:29 -0500     >I wonder if Wicks might fit a time-piece into their consoles - now that >WOULD be a useful accessory for the working organist ! > > > Although it is useful to have a clock at the console, we have stopped incorporating them into consoles because they often stop working after ten years or so, and we find that the original style of clock is then often no longer available, so people would be stuck with having either a clock that didn't work or a hole in their console.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Cats in the Organ From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 13:28:43 -0500   I've only had a couple of problems with cats in the organ. In my = M=F6ller Artiste, they would crawl inside and sprawl across what I call the "porcupine stickers" which contact the appropriate rods for sounding pipes. Get a few dozen stickers bent over, and the organ wails like a cat in heat! Maybe that was the idea! ;>)   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:29:45 EDT   Hello musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk,   In reference to your comment:   =E8 I wonder if Wicks might fit a time-piece into their =E8 consoles - now that WOULD be a useful accessory for =E8 the working organist ! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   Nope - THAT needs to be built into the pulpits!     Victoria, recovering from a 2 1/2 hour long service today    
(back) Subject: Favorite Hymns From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 13:30:28 -0500   "1. Rock of Ages 2. Amazing Grace 3. What A Friend We Have In Jesus 4. How Great Thou Art 5. The Old Rugged Cross"   What?!?! "In the Garden" didn't make the top five? I'm surprised!   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:47:34 -0400     Hello all:     I recall as an organ student many years ago, (many, many, many, years ago) that my fellow students had a cache of word phrases used to assist in feeling the tempi and rhythm of dozens of bach organ works. One such phrase was for the g minor fugue and went like this:   "There isn't any god There isn't any god There is no god There isn't any god etc."       I recall another hits such as "My Socks are dirty". for another fugue, can't recall the title right now.     Now, to my request:   My wife is working on her Phd. in Music Education. It involves the use of movement coupled with overt speech as a method of teaching rhythm. In her research she is collecting (among a myriad other things) references to use of overt speech in rhythm learning.   Can any of you fill me in on other examples, and more importantly, cite references to the origins of these phrases?   Thanks in advance.   jim mcfarland  
(back) Subject: Clock that clergyman! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:53:56 -0400   On 9/28/03 2:29 PM, "Myosotis51@aol.com" <Myosotis51@aol.com> wrote:   > Nope - THAT needs to be built into the pulpits! >=20 > Victoria, recovering from a 2 1/2 hour long service today >=20 Wow; that=B9s longer than SURGERY! What on EARTH was the occasion?   But, Vic, with your (half) Swedish ancestry, and a name like =B3Hedberg,=B2 you might want to know that they HAVE that in Sweden. In Swedish churches, on the edge of every pulpit there is not one but TWO timepieces. And the neat part is that the timepieces have no face, no hands, but are actual HOURGLASSES, permanently affixed to the pulpit! Thus the passage of the sand is in plain view of the congregation!   (Now, I have no idea whether anyone still USES those things, but they=B9re still there, anyway.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Survey From: "Mark Gustus" <MGustus@msn.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:24:59 -0500   Bud, Glenda, and PipeChatters,   "Horbury" is a special favorite of mine as a tune for "Nearer, my God, to Thee." Why, I wonder, didn't it make the 1940 Hymnal? It made an unforgetable apperance in the movie "A Night to Remember."   And then there's RVW's arrangement of "Danby" ('Tis Winter Now). How = could they have left that little sweetheart out?   To Bud's superb list from the 1940 Hymnal, I'd like to add my personal shortlist of grand old thumpers:   Master of Eager Youth (Monks Gate) - 362 Through the Night of Doubt and Sorrow (St. Asaph) - 394 Behold a Sower! (Weymouth) - 401 Watchman, Tell Us of the Night (Watchman) - 440 O Day of Rest and Gladness (Woodbird) - 474 Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing (Sicilian Mariners) - 489 He Who Would Valiant Be (St. Dunstan's) - 563 Lead Us, Heav'nly Father, Lead Us (Dulce Carmen) - 567 Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones (Vigiles Et Sancti) - 599   And Glenda - three cheers for "Hyfrydol" from another reprobate, renegade Episcopalian and former organist. And "Salve Festa Dies" brings back so many happy memories. That's the only hymn I'd HAVE to sing along with. = The alternating verses were bad enough, but then everyone in the chancel = would take off for a solemn procession around the nave. Until they got back I = had NO idea what they were up to.   -Mark