PipeChat Digest #4027 - Sunday, September 28, 2003
 
OFF-TOPIC -- hymn list and hymnals
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Sledmere House and Hull organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Clock that clergyman!
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: Re: Hymn Survey
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Wicks & Hammond
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: The 32' Cornet
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Morning Mishaps :)
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com>
Organ and g*&tar duet
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Organ and g*&tar duet
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"  STARTING OVER
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: g minor fugue..."there is no God"
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
 

(back) Subject: OFF-TOPIC -- hymn list and hymnals From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 12:56:34 -0700   ROFL!   The ones on Mark's list we didn't consider "moldy oldies" ... those were on our STANDARD list (chuckle).   The revisionists were "prowling and prowling around," even in 1938 ... the 1916 Episcopal Hymnal is a MUCH more "Catholic" book ... we still had copies in the choir stalls in the 1950s at St. Paul's in Winter Haven, FL, mostly for all those grand T.T. Noble and Horatio Parker tunes that DIDN'T make it into the 1940 book ... the rector had studied organ with Noble, before he went to seminary to pursue a late vocation (grin).   The Evangelicals were FIRMLY in control of the Hymnal Commission that produced the 1940 Hymnal ... hence the scattering of the Catholic eucharistic hymns throughout the book in order to get them IN there, and the outright removal of others.   Canon Douglas wasn't dumb (grin). He did the best he could. He later restored most of the plainsong hymns in "The St. Dunstan Hymnal," but it was never in wide circulation.   One of the MOST orthodox (and succinct), "I Worship Thee, Lord Jesus" (#252, I believe) is to be found in the "Hymns for Children" section (!). "God Himself Is With Us" and "Jesu, Gentlest Saviour" were relegated to the "General Hymns" section; "O Saving Victim" lost its first FOUR verses AND its proper plainsong tune.   The verses of "Sing of Mary" summarizing the Mysteries of the Rosary were removed altogether and printed in the Hymnal COMPANION, from whence every anglo-catholic organist in the land dutifully copied them and printed them in their service-bulletins (grin).   A point of interest: until fairly recently (sometime in the 20th century), the American Episcopal Church was the ONLY branch of Anglicanism to HAVE an "official" hymnal. And prior to the 1940, General Convention approved texts ONLY ... there were two or three competing musical editions of the 1916 Hymnal, with different tunes.   The Church of England has no official hymnal to this day. Formerly, anglo-catholics used The English Hymnal, edited by RVW; broad churches used Hymns Ancient and Modern; low churches used Songs of Praise. A few collegiate chapels used Woodward's EXCELLENT Songs of Syon, but it was really more of a choirbook than a congregational hymnal.   Sadly, all have been supplanted by bowdlerized newer editions, though I think the unsullied 1933 edition of The English Hymnal is still in print. A few anglo-catholic churches in this country still use it, including my home parish from college days, St. James on 55th Street in Cleveland, OH.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:03:35 EDT   In a message dated 9/28/2003 1:49:44 PM Central Daylight Time, mcfarland6@juno.com writes: recall another hits such as "My Socks are dirty". for another fugue, can't recall the title right now. it sounds like that would work for the bach f major fugue's first subject. i'm sure everyone knows the dupre g minor fugue-marcel dupre, marcel dupre =   the hell you say, the hell you say.   one that i've heard for the bach g minor starts with "there was a little chicken, and it wouldn't lay an egg, so blahhh-cant remember the rest-but = i believe that bob reeves invented it    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:06:54 EDT   In a message dated 9/28/2003 12:45:47 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: and we find that the original style of clock is then often no longer available, so people would be stuck with having either a clock that didn't work or a hole in their console. that wouldn't happen if a quality timepiece was used. just another = example of how doing things right the first time would make life easier for = everyone. btw...i have a wicks at church-and it has an ugly digital clock built = in-but it does work.    
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 13:18:06 -0700 (PDT)   Mmmmmmm,   "There is a little chicken...eh?"   Which ediition are you using?   Then "and it wouldn't lay an egg....eh?"   Another extra note from this phantom edition!   I would suggest for the sake of your students, that you re-write this as:-   "There was a little chick, and it could not lay eggs"   We'll have to make up the rest....how about:-   "So we cooked it well, and Mother ate the legs!"   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > one that i've heard for the bach g minor starts with > "there was a little > chicken, and it wouldn't lay an egg, so blahhh-cant > remember the rest-but i > believe that bob reeves invented it >     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 13:20:40 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   C Minor Fugue..... "Uncle John has lost his trousers".   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- James R McFarland <mcfarland6@juno.com> wrote: > > Now, to my request: > > My wife is working on her Phd. in Music Education. > It involves the use > of movement coupled with overt speech as a method of > teaching rhythm. In > her research she is collecting (among a myriad > other things) references > to use of overt speech in rhythm learning. > > Can any of you fill me in on other examples   __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:21:44 -0400   My thoughts exactly! If the organ builder would install a well made = clock in the first place, it would last much longer than ten years.   I think that I am right when I point out that the clock mounted in the = Cavaille Coll organ in St. Sulpice is the original one, and that must be = - how old......?   I think that a clock could be an option, but it has to be good clock!   Bob Conway ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2003 4:06 PM Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond     In a message dated 9/28/2003 12:45:47 PM Central Daylight Time, = jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: and we find that the original style of clock is then=20 often no longer available, so people would be stuck with having = either a=20 clock that didn't work or a hole in their console. that wouldn't happen if a quality timepiece was used. just another = example of how doing things right the first time would make life easier = for everyone. btw...i have a wicks at church-and it has an ugly digital = clock built in-but it does work.    
(back) Subject: Re: Sledmere House and Hull organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 13:31:32 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Thanks to Bruce Miles for the information concerning Hull organs.   One correction however. When I played the organ at Hull City Hall, it most definitely HAD the Compton luminous stops just like those at the parish church.   It was in the rebuild by Rushworth & Dreaper Ltd., of Liverpool, that stop-knobs were substituted.   I was fascinated to learn that the ex-Astoria Compton is still at Rufforth. Is it used at all?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Bruce Miles <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> wrote: > Greetings all, > > > The ex Astoria Hull Compton is still in situ at > Rufforth. I helped to > install it 1989/90 and was the last to play it after > the failure of the > museum in 1995.   > The Hull Parish Church organ has a Compton > illuminated push-push stop-knob > console whilst the City Hall organ, in spite of > being rebuilt by Compton and > having Tibia etc added, has conventional draw knobs.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 15:37:04 -0500   One of my piano teachers used the "My socks are dirty" words with a Bach = g-minor fugue subject that is probably from the WTC: D-Eb-G-F#-G. The = 2nd half of the subject (A-Bb-C-Bb-A-Bb) was sung to "Oh god-dam, oh = god-dam."   Bob Lind ----- Original Message -----=20   In a message dated 9/28/2003 1:49:44 PM Central Daylight Time, = mcfarland6@juno.com writes: recall another hits such as "My Socks are dirty". for another fugue, can't recall the title right now.    
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 15:40:31 -0500   Is this for the "Arnstadt" c minor--BWV 549?   Bob Lind ----- Original Message ----- > > C Minor Fugue..... "Uncle John has lost his trousers". > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK      
(back) Subject: Re: Clock that clergyman! From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:07:26 -0500       Alan Freed wrote:   > In Swedish churches, on the edge of every pulpit there is not one but > TWO timepieces. And the neat part is that the timepieces have no > face, no hands, but are actual HOURGLASSES, permanently affixed to the > pulpit! Thus the passage of the sand is in plain view of the > congregation!   They used to do this in England too. The annoying thing, though, was that quite a few clergy had the habit of turning the hourglass over when it ran out.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: Re: Hymn Survey From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 16:08:25 -0500   Don't forget Blake's wonderful text - And Did Those Feet in Ancient Time - one of our congregation's all time favorites. Of course we're in Canada with a dominant British Isles background. An American friend once told me that this hymn "chilled the cockles of her little Yankee heart!"   Russ   On Saturday, September 27, 2003, at 07:33 PM, quilisma@cox.net wrote:   > I just happen to keep a list of "Moldy Oldies" (grin), to make sure I > hit ALL of them at least once a year ... numbers refer to the > (American) Episcopal Hymnal, 1940:    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 17:08:00 -0400   Aha! A new thread: organs and clocks.   The Hillgreen and Lane I used to play at Philippus UCC Church in over-the-Rhine in Cincinnati had a clock built in, as I recall, that unfortunately (or fortunately) no longer worked when I played there. Where I play now, there is a clock on the wall (the console is in the rear balcony) that, though electric, makes regular ticks that I can hear if I am practicing alone at night. I can use it as a metronome, but alas it's non-adjustable. Sometimes it's hard to tune out. At La Trinit=E9 in Paris, there is an even more loudly ticking one hanging on the balcony not far fro= m the organ console. I guess Naji pays it no mind. But it did rather bug me during quiet passages (he was playing, not I).       Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu           on 9/28/03 4:21 PM, Bob Conway at conwayb@sympatico.ca wrote:   My thoughts exactly! If the organ builder would install a well made clock in the first place, it would last much longer than ten years.   I think that I am right when I point out that the clock mounted in the Cavaille Coll organ in St. Sulpice is the original one, and that must be - how old......?   I think that a clock could be an option, but it has to be good clock!   Bob Conway ----- Original Message ----- From: Gfc234@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2003 4:06 PM Subject: Re: Wicks & Hammond   In a message dated 9/28/2003 12:45:47 PM Central Daylight Time, jlspeller@mindspring.com writes: and we find that the original style of clock is then often no longer available, so people would be stuck with having either a clock that didn't work or a hole in their console. that wouldn't happen if a quality timepiece was used. just another example of how doing things right the first time would make life easier for everyone. btw...i have a wicks at church-and it has an ugly digital clock built in-but it does work. =20          
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 22:17:25 +0100 (BST)   James R McFarland wrote "I recall as an organ student many years ago, (many, many, many, years ago) that my fellow students had a cache of word phrases used to assist in feeling the tempi and rhythm of dozens of bach organ works."   Ah well - I knew it as   Old Ebenezer Prout You really are a lout You've turned poor Bach Right inside out   John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week :50 years ago Potage Tournemire   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: The 32' Cornet From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 18:10:42 -0400   As promised, I checked at Heinz Chapel today, but the 32' Grand Cornet is gone! Evidently Reuter removed it during the 1995 rebuild. The Allen 32s from 1989 do about 8.3 on the Richter scale, so I guess they decided the cornet was no longer needed. Oh well. Now I'm off to hear Dame Gillian at Calvary Episcopal.   Later, WG      
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 18:24:41 EDT   In a message dated 9/28/03 2:49:50 PM Eastern Daylight Time, mcfarland6@juno.com writes:   << It involves the use of movement coupled with overt speech as a method of teaching rhythm. In her research she is collecting (among a myriad other things) references to use of overt speech in rhythm learning. Can any of you fill me in on other examples, and more importantly, cite references to the origins of these phrases? >>   Are you thinking along the lines of words like "pie" for quarter notes, "ap-ple" for eighths, "huc-kle-ber-ry" or "Mis-sis-sip-pi" or = "Ma-ser-a-ti" for sixteenth notes, etc??   I have a large collection of these which I use with my students which help =   them recognize and remember rhythms. (Perhaps the most useful is = "Am-ster-dam" for the dotted-eighth/sixteenth/eighth rhythm in a siciliano - that's a = rhythm which scares and confounds most students when they see it printed).   Richard  
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 18:47:44 -0500   And I knew it as "Old Ebenezer Prout / He had a funny snout / And he turned it round / The other way about." I also know the C minor fugue as "Uncle TOM's lost his trousers." I guess there are various versions around. I believe that quite a few of these rhymes were actually invented by Ebenezer Prout to help identify Bach's works to his students -- in the nineteenth century there wasn't a thematic index with BWV = numbers.   John Speller   John Foss wrote:   >James R McFarland wrote >"I recall as an organ student many years ago, (many, >many, many, years ago) that my fellow students had a >cache of word phrases used to assist in feeling the >tempi and rhythm of dozens of bach organ works." > >Ah well - I knew it as > >Old Ebenezer Prout >You really are a lout >You've turned poor Bach >Right inside out > >John Foss > >        
(back) Subject: Morning Mishaps :) From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 18:56:42 -0500   Hello, PipeChatters,   I think I filled my quota for doing dumb things in church this morning. My first Mass was ok, but during the second I was late for the Alleluia before the Gospel, I discovered that I did not have the book open to the right page at Offeratory (and hence had to search for it), and to cap things off, I neither had the page marked nor could I remember the name of the hymn for the Closing! Worse yet for my third Mass, I couldn't even find the hymn book and so had to play everything from memory!   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@mindspring.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 18:58:12 -0500     Aha! There is actually a website dealing with Ebenezer Prout's rhymes for Bach's 48. See   http://gigue.peabody.jhu.edu/~mathews/archive/Prout_Mnem/prout.html   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Organ and g*&tar duet From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 19:01:33 -0500   Hello,   Does anyone know of any duets for organ and -please, flaming- guitar? One of my choir members who plays the guitar is interested in playing some kind of duets for Preludes, Communion, or Postludes. I would also be interested if someone knows of any guitar-recorder duets.   Thanks.   Alicia Zeilenga Sub-Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 17:20:24 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I don't know. The music is at church, but it's the one with the Prelude which has a pedal solo part.   You'll know the one-   I stroked the cat (pause), I stroked the cat (pause), I stroked the cat etc   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Robert Lind <lindr@core.com> wrote: > Is this for the "Arnstadt" c minor--BWV 549?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and g*&tar duet From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 17:23:35 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Something stirs in the back of my grey matter.   Didn't John Williams and Peter Hurford produce an organ & guitar recording?   Anyone remember it?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Alicia Zeilenga <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> wrote: > Hello, > > Does anyone know of any duets for organ and -please, > flaming- guitar?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search http://shopping.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" STARTING OVER From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 21:02:30 -0400       MY APOLOGIES FOR NOT GOING INTO ENOUGH DEPTH WITH MY DESCRIPTION.   Actually the study is much deeper than I let on, and is Orff related. It is founded on the Orff concept that movement (for example: body percussion) compounded with overt speech, is said to produce greater efficiency in teaching rhythmic accuracy. There has been no research done to prove this, and that is the foundation of my wife's upcoming quantitative study. As with all theses, the research must be all-encompassing as to what has been done before, and what methods have been in use. Use of words like "wonderful" and "Mississippi Hot Dog" to teach simple patterns is well documented, and not what this is about. Her research involves the use of longer phrases which actually invoke the pulse stresses and all of the subtleties and nuances of rhythmic expression. "There isn't any God" repeated, invokes those nuances. "Old Ebenezer Prout, You really are a lout" does not. Perhaps my example is poor, because it would probably be most effective only among those of certain religious beliefs. I hope, however that you get my drift.   My wife requires the and more importantly, the original sources for such examples. She is also collecting movement examples, and sources (Dalcrose etc.). All of this is only ancillary to the real meat of her topic, which is the combinative use of the two.     Jim     On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 22:17:25 +0100 (BST) = =3D?iso-8859-1?q?John=3D20Foss?=3D <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> writes: > James R McFarland wrote > "I recall as an organ student many years ago, (many, > many, many, years ago) that my fellow students had a > cache of word phrases used to assist in feeling the > tempi and rhythm of dozens of bach organ works." > > Ah well - I knew it as > > Old Ebenezer Prout > You really are a lout > You've turned poor Bach > Right inside out > > John Foss  
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue..."there is no God" From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 21:04:52 -0400   Okay, Jim, only because you asked <g>.   If I recall, this was for the same fugue but I'm cleaning it up lest anyo= ne be offended:   My life is such a bore My mother is a ***** And to make things worse My father drives a hearse   I hadn't thought about this in years and of course now I won't be able to stop. Curse you!   Emily A.   >Subject: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" >From: "James R McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> >Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:47:34 -0400   >Hello all:   >I recall as an organ student many years ago, (many, many, many, years >ago) that my fellow students had a cache of word phrases used to assist >in feeling the tempi and rhythm of dozens of bach organ works. One such >phrase was for the g minor fugue and went like this:   >"There isn't any god >There isn't any god >There is no god >There isn't any god etc."   >I recall another hits such as "My Socks are dirty". for another fugue, >can't recall the title right now.   >Now, to my request:   >My wife is working on her Phd. in Music Education. It involves the use >of movement coupled with overt speech as a method of teaching rhythm. I= n >her research she is collecting (among a myriad other things) reference= s >to use of overt speech in rhythm learning.   >Can any of you fill me in on other examples, and more importantly, cite >references to the origins of these phrases?   >Thanks in advance.   >jim mcfarland  
(back) Subject: Clock that clergyman! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:53:56 -0400   On 9/28/03 2:29 PM, "Myosotis51@aol.com" <Myosotis51@aol.com> wrote:   > Nope - THAT needs to be built into the pulpits! > > Victoria, recovering from a 2 1/2 hour long service today > Wow; that=B9s longer than SURGERY! What on EARTH was the occasion?   But, Vic, with your (half) Swedish ancestry, and a name like =B3Hedberg,=B2= you might want to know that they HAVE that in Sweden. In Swedish churches, o= n the edge of every pulpit there is not one but TWO timepieces. And the ne= at part is that the timepieces have no face, no hands, but are actual HOURGLASSES, permanently affixed to the pulpit! Thus the passage of the sand is in plain view of the congregation!   (Now, I have no idea whether anyone still USES those things, but they=B9r= e still there, anyway.)   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Survey From: "Mark Gustus" <MGustus@msn.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2003 14:24:59 -0500   Bud, Glenda, and PipeChatters,   "Horbury" is a special favorite of mine as a tune for "Nearer, my God, to Thee." Why, I wonder, didn't it make the 1940 Hymnal? It made an unforgetable apperance in the movie "A Night to Remember."   And then there's RVW's arrangement of "Danby" ('Tis Winter Now). How cou= ld they have left that little sweetheart out?   To Bud's superb list from the 1940 Hymnal, I'd like to add my personal shortlist of grand old thumpers:   Master of Eager Youth (Monks Gate) - 362 Through the Night of Doubt and Sorrow (St. Asaph) - 394 Behold a Sower! (Weymouth) - 401 Watchman, Tell Us of the Night (Watchman) - 440 O Day of Rest and Gladness (Woodbird) - 474 Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing (Sicilian Mariners) - 489 He Who Would Valiant Be (St. Dunstan's) - 563 Lead Us, Heav'nly Father, Lead Us (Dulce Carmen) - 567 Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones (Vigiles Et Sancti) - 599   And Glenda - three cheers for "Hyfrydol" from another reprobate, renegade Episcopalian and former organist. And "Salve Festa Dies" brings back so many happy memories. That's the only hymn I'd HAVE to sing along with. = The alternating verses were bad enough, but then everyone in the chancel wou= ld take off for a solemn procession around the nave. Until they got back I = had NO idea what they were up to.   -Mark