PipeChat Digest #4032 - Tuesday, September 30, 2003
 
Re: Pedalling and Compton's
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
German translations for Karg-Elert and Bunk
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Favorite Hymns
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Hymn Tunes
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: German translations for Karg-Elert and Bunk
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Tunes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: German translations for Karg-Elert and Bunk
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Liszt Ave Maria (x-post)
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Liszt Ave Maria (x-post)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Scary phone call
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Scary phone call
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Scary phone call-1812 War Overture
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Scary phone call
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Scary phone call-1812 War Overture
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Scary phone call
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Scary phone call
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Scary phone call
  by "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu>
Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"
  by "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
32' Cornet
  by "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net>
Re:Mozard texts
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Scary phone call
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
1812 overture
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
so much for that ...
  by <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Pedalling and Compton's From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 10:39:54 +0100 (BST)   Dear List, Reading Malcolm's post today and his mention of Gillian Weir ties in with the discussion on pedalling - toes and heels. There are very few really memorable performances I have heard, but one was Dame Gillian's of the Bach D major at the Royal Festival Hall back in the 60's. I can't remember the rest of the programme now, but I do remember that, and I am sure she used both heels and toes. It brought the house down. Since we both studied with Ralph Downes and I have my original marked copy of the D major from my student days, which uses both heels and toes, I expect she probably did - and does - likewise. It doesn't really seem to matter to me which technique you use, provided you have control over rhythm, attack and release, and staccato and legato. You do need to exercise your ankles, and keep your feet as near the pedalboard as you can - also the sharps are a useful landmark when you are practising. Personally I find using heels and toes requires less movement, and the elimination of unnecessary movement is a key factor in good performance. 2) Compton's Colin - go to the NPOR site - this lists all the extant Compton's. I did offer to write about Compton's for the dictionary in production by Routledge, though it would have involved some research. They asked me to write the entry for cinema organs, which I did. At an early stage of my life I went to Compton's with a view to going into organ building, but Jimmy Taylor advised against it - he said that there was no money in it! But St Mary Magdalene's, Paddington (1933) is a more representative example of a Compton in original condition than St Bride's, which is a relatively late work, I would have thought, or Chelsea Parish Church, though it does incorporate some pipework from earlier organs. Not all there late organs were good. Southwark RC Cathedral is not well balanced - the main choruses are too weak and the Tuba totally out of proportion to the rest. St Olave's, Hart Street, is not a great success either in my view, though the acoustics there do not help. John Foss     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week :50 years ago Potage Tournemire   ________________________________________________________________________ Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo! Messenger http://mail.messenger.yahoo.co.uk  
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "MusicMan" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 10:43:17 +0100   Hi, Colin,   ........ and I've just bought one ......... and the "gas-guzzler" 4 litre = at that !"   But at least we pronounce the word Jaguar the way it should be (for the = car, that is - maybe, in the depths of the jungle, a touch of Spanish might be acceptable as the feline version approacheth). How can 'our American brothers' get SO many words 'tongue-tied' ? From oregano to tomato / potato. No wonder 'their' diapasons can sound different to 'ours'.   Harry [a.k.a. musicman]   -----Original Message----- From: Colin Mitchell <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: 29 September 2003 16:45 Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God"   [Edited]   Hello, I once had a Jaguar! (Colin Mitchell)      
(back) Subject: German translations for Karg-Elert and Bunk From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 07:27:10 -0500   Yesterday I went through a great deal of organ literature that's been sitting around, piled up over many months, some of which I didn't remember buying. Settings of chorale melodies are things I generally avoid, but I found some that I plan to use. One album I perused was Karg-Elert's Op. = 78, from which I decided that "Sollt ich meinem Gott nicht singen?" is = something I may play while my page turner is on vacation. Interestingly, Sebastian Gluck mentioned this very work some hours later in one of his posts. Two questions:   1. Can anyone supply a good English translation for this? I'm aware of "I will sing my Maker's Praises," but can imagine something better than this--perhaps a translation that retains the question mark.   2. My score is that of Masters Music Publications, Inc., obviously a = reprint of public-domain material. On page 1, the entire bottom system is one oversized measure that doesn't fit into the 4/2 time signature (there are too many beats), and it has a dotted vertical bar line within it at the point that the measure "should" end. If there are people out there who = have played/do play this piece, how have you handled the rhythms at this point?   I also looked through "Choralimprovisationen" by Gerard Bunk (1888-1958), published in 2002 by Dr. J. Butz (Verl.-Nr. 1559). These have to be the 37 "unpublished" improvisations (+ one additional piece) mentioned by John Henderson in his Directory, and I'm most happy that they are now = published. Bunk is a fine craftsman, and the spirit of Bach is ever with him. I'm pleased that I finally took the time to go through these and to add them = to my other Bunk works (such as his organ sonata). They are accessible, = worthy pieces. Length varies from one page to several. Difficulty goes from = rather easy to tricky.   Would someone please provide a translation of the chorale "Dir, dir, O Hoechster, will ich singen."   Thanks in advance. There are other works that caught my fancy yesterday = that I'd be happy to recommend, if anyone is interested.   Bob Lind        
(back) Subject: Favorite Hymns From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 11:26:06 -0500   Thanks to all for your responses on your favorite Hymns.   104 Entries were received, and tabulated below in Alphabetical order. With our various demonimations, cultural backgrounds and from the US & abroad, we have much in common with our Christian faith. Consider this: most of the well written hymns document the entire Gospel message from redemption to the Second Coming. Some songs, I haven't sung in a long time, and they bring back great memories.   Some hymns were not familiar to me, so pardon any spelling errors. I will send a separate listing of Hymn Tunes as well.   Again, thanks for your kind participation.     ORGANISTS' CHOICE OF FAVORITE HYMNS:   A Mighty Fortress Abide With Me All Hail The Power Of Jesus=92 Name All my hope on God is founded Am I A Soldier Of The Cross Amazing Grace And Did Those Feet in Ancient Time Behold a Sower! Beneath The Cross Of Jesus Blessed Assurance, Jesus is mine! Blest Be The Tie That Binds Breathe On Me, Breath Of God Christ For The World We Sing Christ is made the sure foundation Come, Holy Spirit, Heavenly Dove Come, labor on Come, Ye Disconsolate Crown Him With Many Crowns Dear Lord And Father Of Mankind Dear Lord and God of Humankind (... and Father of mankind) Fairest Lord Jesus Faith Of Our Fathers For all the saints Glorious things of thee are spoken God Be With You Till We Meet Again God Of Grace And God Of Glory God of Our Fathers (God of the Ages) Golden Harps Are Sounding Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah Hark, Hark My Soul He keeps me singing He Leadeth Me He Who Would Valiant Be Holy God We Praise Thy Name Holy, Holy, Holy How Firm A Foundation How Great Thou Art I Heard The Voice Of Jesus Say I Love Thy Kingdom, Lord I Need Thee Every Hour I stand amazed in the presence In The Cross Of Christ I Glory In the Garden In The Hour Of Trial Jerusalem Jesus Calls Us Jesus Shall Reign Jesus, And Shall It Ever Be Jesus, My Saviour, Look On Me Jesus, The Very Thought Of Thee Joyful, joyful, we adore thee Just As I Am Lead on, O King Eternal Lead Us, Heav=92nly Father, Lead Us Lead Us, O Father Lead, Kindly Light Lift High the Cross Lift Up Your Heads Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing Love divine, all loves excelling Master of Eager Youth My Faith Looks Up To Thee Nearer, My God, To Thee Now, my tongue, the mystery telling O Day of Rest and Gladness O For A Closer Walk With God O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing O Jesus, Thou Art Standing O Lamb Of God, Still Keep Me O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go O Saviour, Precious Saviour On Our Way Rejoicing Onward, Christian Soldiers Praise, my soul, the King of heaven Redeemed, How I Love to Proclaim it Rejoice, Ye Pure In Heart Rise Up, O Men Of God Rise, Crowned With Light Rock Of Ages Saved! Saved Saviour, Again To Thy Dear Name We Raise Sing them over again to me, wonderful words of life Soon May The Last Glad Song Arise St. Agatha=92s Hymn Stand Up, Stand Up For Jesus Standing on the Promises of God Take My Life, And Let It Be The Church=92s One Foundation The Old Rugged Cross There=92s a Wideness In God=92s Mercy Thou Didst Leave Thy Throne Thou Hidden Love Of God, Whose Height Through the Night of Doubt and Sorrow Tis Winter Now Trusting Jesus Watchman, Tell Us of the Night Were you there What A Friend We Have In Jesus What Wondrous Love Is This? When I Survey The Wondrous Cross When Morning Gilds The Skies When the roll is called up yonder Ye holy angels bright Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones     David E   International Bible Society Colorado Springs, CO      
(back) Subject: Hymn Tunes From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 11:42:05 -0500   As promised, following are Hymn Tunes listed alphabetically. As before, some name are unfamiliar to me, so if you see any listing that are 'NOT' right, I stand corrected.   ORGANISTS' CHOICE OF HYMN TUNES   Ada Ascension Austria Beecher Crucifier Cwm Rhondda Danby Darwall=92s 148th Deo gracias Diademata Down Ampney Duke Street Dulce Carmen Ein feste Burg Grafton Hanover Horbury Hyfrydol Hymn to joy Lasst uns erfreuen Lauda anima Laudes Domini Leoni Lobet Dem Herren Michael Mit Freuden Zart Monks Gate Moscow Nicaea Ora labora Royal Oak Rustington Salve Festa Dies Salve festiva Sicilian Mariners Sine Nomine St. Anne St. Asaph St. Dunstan=92s St. Michaelmas Ton-y-Botel Vigiles Et Sancti Watchman Welsh tune Westminster Abbey Weymouth Woodbird       David E   David Evangelides International Bible Society   Colorado Springs, Colorado      
(back) Subject: Re: German translations for Karg-Elert and Bunk From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 13:04:43 EDT   Hi Bob:   I will sing my Master's praises sounds like the opening of the eucharistic prayer Pange Lingua used in processions. It was written by St. Thomas Aquinas. Is that the one you are refering to? I have an english translation of that I can send to you.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Tunes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 14:46:00 -0400   On 9/30/03 12:42 PM, "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> wrote:   > As promised, following are Hymn Tunes listed alphabetically. As before, > some name are unfamiliar to me, so if you see any listing that are 'NOT' > right, I stand corrected. > > ORGANISTS' CHOICE OF HYMN TUNES > > Ada > Ascension   David: I haven't had a chance to examine your two lists yet (that'll take time). But I think you've done a good thing, and want to thank you.   Alan www.stlukesnyc.org    
(back) Subject: Re: German translations for Karg-Elert and Bunk From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 14:46:44 -0400   "Sollt ich meinem Gott nicht singen?""I > will sing my Maker's Praises," but can imagine something better than > this--perhaps a translation that retains the question mark.   I should think (und ich sage sehr klein Deutsch) that this would mean = "Shall I not sing my [of] my God?"   Would someone please provide a translation of the chorale "Dir, dir, O > Hoechster, will ich singen." "To Thee, O Highest, will I sing." > > > Bob Lind     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Liszt Ave Maria (x-post) From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 14:02:19 -0500   Hi! Can anyone tell me in which Liszt volumes the Ave Maria von Arcadelt can be found? Is it in the Dover edition??     Blessings, Beau Surratt Minister of Worship and Music United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago Piano Instructor, Hyde Park Suzuki Institute Home Email: Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com Suzuki Email: beausurratt@hydeparksuzuki.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Liszt Ave Maria (x-post) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:11:28 EDT   Hi Beau:   Find someone who has A Montini edition of the St. Gregory Hymnal 200B is the Ave Maria.   Ron    
(back) Subject: Scary phone call From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:36:11 -0400   Your advice, please?!   On my answering machine is a message from our new associate pastor. Early 30's, smart, likes classical music. This summer he switched over from Church of the Nazarene to our United Methodist conference, and was appointed to us by the Bishop. The message concerns his desire for me to play the 1812 Overture on the organ in conjunction with a sermon he wants to do in November. Or December. (which made me wonder if he knows that's ADVENT.)   Is there an organ transcription of this piece? I don't own one, and if there's no published arrangement, that might be my out. If I say I don't play secular stuff in church, then what if he hits me with Lohengrin and Midsummer Night's Dream? Or, could I say that the dramatic effect of trying to do this on the organ would be comedic and is that what he intends during worship?   What would you do? What should I say? Thanks in advance.   Chuck Peery Cincinnati    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 12:49:26 -0700   Just play a verse or two of "God the Omnipotent" (Russian Hymn) on the full organ, and aim the cannons at the pulpit <EG>.   Bud   Charles Peery wrote:   > Your advice, please?! > > On my answering machine is a message from our new associate pastor. > Early 30's, smart, likes classical music. This summer he switched over > from Church of the Nazarene to our United Methodist conference, and was > appointed to us by the Bishop. The message concerns his desire for me > to play the 1812 Overture on the organ in conjunction with a sermon he > wants to do in November. Or December. (which made me wonder if he knows =   > that's ADVENT.) > > Is there an organ transcription of this piece? I don't own one, and if > there's no published arrangement, that might be my out. If I say I > don't play secular stuff in church, then what if he hits me with > Lohengrin and Midsummer Night's Dream? Or, could I say that the > dramatic effect of trying to do this on the organ would be comedic and > is that what he intends during worship? > > What would you do? What should I say? Thanks in advance. > > Chuck Peery > Cincinnati > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call-1812 War Overture From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:46:43 -0400   For starts: I'd check a recording for the length of time the 1812 Overture = requires and tell him coupled with the lack of an available musical score = of the work transcribed for the Organ. That alone should be deterent = enough NOT to include it in the worship service. It is a mystery as to how = anyone could justify such a piece of music in the context of worship, = particularly in this time of war.   Let us know the outcome, please!   Dale G. Rider Independence, MO, USA  
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:56:48 -0400   I like Bud's idea, - but does the organ have cannons?   Now if he could find a couple of starters pistols and let them go at the appropriate moment he might be in business. (Or out of a job!)   Or perhaps a couple of well timed fireworks might do the trick! The mind boggles at all the possibilities!   Bob   ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2003 3:49 PM Subject: Re: Scary phone call     > Just play a verse or two of "God the Omnipotent" (Russian Hymn) on the > full organ, and aim the cannons at the pulpit <EG>. > > Bud > > Charles Peery wrote: > > > Your advice, please?! > > > > On my answering machine is a message from our new associate pastor. > > Early 30's, smart, likes classical music. This summer he switched = over > > from Church of the Nazarene to our United Methodist conference, and = was > > appointed to us by the Bishop. The message concerns his desire for me > > to play the 1812 Overture on the organ in conjunction with a sermon he > > wants to do in November. Or December. (which made me wonder if he = knows > > that's ADVENT.) > > > > Is there an organ transcription of this piece? I don't own one, and = if > > there's no published arrangement, that might be my out. If I say I > > don't play secular stuff in church, then what if he hits me with > > Lohengrin and Midsummer Night's Dream? Or, could I say that the > > dramatic effect of trying to do this on the organ would be comedic and > > is that what he intends during worship? > > > > What would you do? What should I say? Thanks in advance. > > > > Chuck Peery > > Cincinnati > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call-1812 War Overture From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 16:01:27 -0400   Win one, lose one. The timing issue is a good one, most recorded versions are about 15.5 minutes. However, a Google search pulled up PAGES of published versions of the 1812, some were the full score and some were for piano, which brings the questions "Well, can't you play from THAT??"   Chuck Peery Cincinnati On Tuesday, September 30, 2003, at 03:46 PM, ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > For starts: I'd check a recording for the length of time the 1812 > Overture requires and tell him coupled with the lack of an available > musical score of the work transcribed for the Organ. That alone should > be deterent enough NOT to include it in the worship service. It is a > mystery as to how anyone could justify such a piece of music in the > context of worship, particularly in this time of war. > > Let us know the outcome, please! > > Dale G. Rider > Independence, MO, USA > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 16:03:40 -0400     Chuck, Call Mannerino's Music and have them order (or they may have in stock already) the _Classical Fake Book_, 2nd edition, published by Hal Leonard. It has an excerpt from the 1812 overture along with 850 other classical themes. This could be a lot of fun! For example, you could play the = March to the Scaffold from Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique when the mood strikes you--it's on p. 144. A little comedy never hurt anybody!   Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu           on 9/30/03 3:36 PM, Charles Peery at cepeery@earthlink.net wrote:   > Your advice, please?! > > On my answering machine is a message from our new associate pastor. > Early 30's, smart, likes classical music. This summer he switched over > from Church of the Nazarene to our United Methodist conference, and was > appointed to us by the Bishop. The message concerns his desire for me > to play the 1812 Overture on the organ in conjunction with a sermon he > wants to do in November. Or December. (which made me wonder if he knows > that's ADVENT.) > > Is there an organ transcription of this piece? I don't own one, and if > there's no published arrangement, that might be my out. If I say I > don't play secular stuff in church, then what if he hits me with > Lohengrin and Midsummer Night's Dream? Or, could I say that the > dramatic effect of trying to do this on the organ would be comedic and > is that what he intends during worship? > > What would you do? What should I say? Thanks in advance. > > Chuck Peery > Cincinnati > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 16:42:37 EDT   Hey Chuck:   Does the pastor realize you need canons firing off in church to complete the score? Now I'd call that a real scary phone call. It'd sure keep the ladies with blue hair from going to sleep during the sermon. < I don't know whether to grin or not> Arggggghhh!   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: "Shelley Culver" <culverse@westminster.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 16:51:42 -0400   "Does the pastor realize you need canons firing off in church to complete the score?"   How about a creative alternative to canons? I went to a symphony concert on July 4th where they played the 1812. Every one was given 3 paper lunch bags when they entered the amphitheatre. When the appropriate time came, you blew into your bag and popped it, when the conductor pointed to your section of the audience. It was really fun. How about that during church? ;)   Shelley       >>> RonSeverin@aol.com 09/30/03 4:42 PM >>> Hey Chuck:   Does the pastor realize you need canons firing off in church to complete the score? Now I'd call that a real scary phone call. It'd sure keep the ladies with blue hair from going to sleep during the sermon. < I don't know whether to grin or not> Arggggghhh!   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: g minor fugue . . ."there is no God" From: "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 17:22:12 -0400   Don't forget ...   This is the symphony That Schubert wrote but never finished.   .... and the immortal ditty, in g minor ...   Old Mozart is locked in the closet. Let him out! Let him out! Let him out!    
(back) Subject: 32' Cornet From: "Bigaquarium" <Bigaquarium@netzero.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 18:11:06 -0400   >Ideally, the two pipes making up each note should stand as close together as possible, perhaps arranged like the >ranks in a mixture stop. Would = this be part of Compton's secret?   Hi all!   I was able to take my notebook with me on the trip. (C:   Anyways, I remember reading an article in the Tracker about J.G. = Pfeffer and there was a picture of a "Monkey Quint" where, for instance, the 8' = and it's quint shared a common pipe foot connected at the block somewhere. = Has anyone heard a "Monkey Quint" before?   = -Nate   "The traveling apprentice"      
(back) Subject: Re:Mozard texts From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 19:05:32 -0400   On 9/30/03 5:22 PM, "Dick Meckstroth" <support@opensystemsorgans.com> = wrote:   > Don't forget ... > > This is the symphony > That Schubert wrote but never finished. > And,   It's a bird, it's a plane, it's a Mozart, Ta da da, ta da da, ta da da DAH!   39th, isn't it? 40th?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Scary phone call From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 18:55:53 -0500   At 03:36 PM 9/30/2003 -0400, Chuck wrote: >The message concerns his desire for me to play the 1812 Overture on the >organ in conjunction with a sermon he wants to do in November. <snip> >What would you do? What should I say?     Silly question here -- are you absolutely certain that HIS "1812" is in fact THE "1812"? In other words, is there the slightest possibility that he has that name mixed up with another orchestral warhorse?   I just gotta wonder....<G>   ....what on earth the real 1812 Overture would have to do with anything in = a Methodist sermon...especially at x-mas time. (don't forget, most = Methodists don't really do advent, except for the little purple candle wreath that gets dug out of the attic with the rest of the x-mas decorations, as soon as Thanksgiving's over...)   Do let us know what becomes of this. I'm certain I'm not the only one who =   is curious to hear the rest of the story!   Cheers,   Tim    
(back) Subject: 1812 overture From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 20:16:26 -0500   I'd certainly have a positive attitude here. The pastor may have but a 30-second excerpt in mind for a children's sermon. It could be a lot of = fun, and you might have a chance to show people that such transcriptions can work--effectively--on the organ. Bob Lind    
(back) Subject: so much for that ... From: <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 19:01:17 -0700   Spent the day on the phone ... I have no legal recourse ... the City of Newport Beach is satisfied that St. Matthew's has provided "equivalent space" for a handicapped organist, even though both the space and the small organ on the main floor of the nave have been REMOVED.   Also, California is a "fire-at-will" state; I would have to PROVE that they engaged in "creative dismissal" in order to force me to resign BECAUSE I am handicapped, in order to avoid the expense of making the choir loft accessible.   Nobody takes employment discrimination cases on contingency. If I had $10K to fight it, I wouldn't need to be DOING it (chuckle).   For the same reason, Legal Aid doesn't take employment discrimination = cases.   Ah, America! Where you get as much justice as you can afford ...   Cheers,   Bud