PipeChat Digest #4416 - Tuesday, April 6, 2004
 
Willis and Lewis in London
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca>
Re: Rhymes
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Lewis organic octopod
  by "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Easter postludes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Easter postludes
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Lanquetuit
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Lanquetuit
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Schlicker at Grace Church at 10th street and Broadway in NYC
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Reminder-Ron Reseigh Plays Rochester Wurlitzer Saturday (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Hal Pritchard
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
RE: Flags -- Cadet Chapel & altar
  by "Wm. G. Chapman" <wchapmn@attglobal.net>
RE: Easter postludes
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Easter postludes
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Guilmant's real theme
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Easter postludes
  by "Nicholas Good" <nickgood@ix.netcom.com>
Re: Guilmant's real theme
  by "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org>
 

(back) Subject: Willis and Lewis in London From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 20:02:02 +0100 (BST)   In addition to the Willis organ at Union Chapel, Islington, which is a masterpiece and has a Historic Organ Certificate, there are other Father Willis organs in that area. Union Chapel has Barker lever to the Great and Swell, tubular pneumatic to the pedal, but the Choir is all tracker. It was a little in need of TLC when I played it 40 years ago, so what it's like today I dread to think, though perhaps it has had some attention? Fr Willis had his factory at the Rotunda Works in Camden Town from 1866 to 1905, in the heart of London's steam train land. Another notably magnificent instrument is St Dominic's Priory, Haverstock Hill in Hampstead (which adjoins Islington), which has all tracker action to the manuals and pneumatic to pedals. It is also the bearer of a Historic Organ certificate, and is arguably finer than Union Chapel, though it's a close run thing. Personally I have never played a bad Fr. Willis organ, but then I may have been lucky. I think we have covered this fertile ground before! Then there is St Mary Magdalene, Holloway Road - beautiful instrument - and sounds to die for on the II/14 at the strangely ornate small Cathedral of the Good Shepherd in Stamford Hill. It is home to the The Agapemonites (Agape is, as I'm sure you all know, Greek for love in the spiritual sense. This is strongly encouraged here in Greece.) The exterior of this church is worth a visit on its own for the amazing creatures displayed thereon - you can see them at http://www.clapton.freeservers.com/photo3.html if you so wish. It's worth a click on the link. Colin is the expert on Fr Willis' private life - I don't believe a word of it, Colin! - and whereas I maintain that Harrison and Harrison first built there reputation on rebuilding Willis organs, I think Colin believes Willis built his on re-building Lewis organs! I'm looking forward to playing the 1990 Harrison rebuild of the 4 manual 1890 Lewis organ in St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne in the summer - it's not until August 27th, but any Australian members in that area can mark the lunch time recital for that day in their notebooks! I think this has gone straight from Lewis to Harrison without an intervening Willis period. John Foss   George Bayley wrote "There is another superb London organ, however, and that is the splendid three manual Father Willis of the 1870s in Union Chapel, Islington."   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Gibson's "Passion" Jokes, satire and humour     ____________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 12:18:18 -0700 (PDT)   Lanquetiut sounds great for Easter...but Im learning it after Easter to do = for some other time of year...probably Christ the King Sunday. i do Widor = for Christmas for Postlude. For Easter Im doing Boellmann's Toccata.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 12:20:44 -0700 (PDT)   Dale, did you get your hymn intros? how you like em? HC? Whats HC?     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "atal" <atal@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 15:32:00 -0400   Chorus, as in "Hallelujah" by GFH ----- Original Message -----=20 From: T.Desiree' Hines=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 3:20 PM Subject: Re: Easter postludes     Dale, did you get your hymn intros? how you like em?   HC? Whats HC?     From Desiree'=20 T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html     -------------------------------------------------------------------------= ----- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today  
(back) Subject: Re: Rhymes From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 15:44:20 -0400   There are a lot of these texts floating around. But allow me to brazenly change the subject a bit. Who among you agree with me that although this is a wild and fun piece to play and to hear, it is, after all, a = really lousy fugue? Starts out well, develops like a lump of lead, then ends well, but just barely.   All due respect, etc. Just my 2 cents worth. Anyone else?   -WG     > "Charlie Lester" <crlester@137.com> wrote: > > One of my favorites: > > "Marcel Dupre, > Marcel Dupre, > The hell you say, > The hell you say > This piece is harder than hell to play..." > > (Sung to the tune of Dupre's g-minor fugue)      
(back) Subject: Lewis organic octopod From: "John Foss" <harfo32@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 20:44:12 +0100 (BST)   While checking my facts for the post on London Willis and Lewis organs I happenchanced upon the specification for the old 4 manual Lewis organ in Harrow School Speech room - replaced by a new Harrison in 1955. (I believe that bomb damage to the roof allowed water to get in and ruined the Lewis instrument, which was removed in 1943.) It is interesting to note that out of 35 manual stops, 27 of them were at 8'. There was one three rank mixture on the swell, and two 2' flutes, 4 flues at 4' and a 4' reed spread over the rest of the great, swell and choir. The Solo had 6 stops, all at 8'. Now that is what I call an octopod. The new Harrison is pretty rock solid, too! John Foss   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D www.johnfoss.gr http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/ Topics of the week : Gibson's "Passion" Jokes, satire and humour     ____________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends today! Download Messenger Now http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com/download/index.html  
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 15:50:28 EDT   In a message dated 4/6/2004 2:49:54 PM Eastern Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:   > What's the HC? >   handel-----hallelujah chorus   dale in Florida    
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 17:24:54 EDT   Desiree, Interesting choice! This year I'll do an improvisation on the Easter = Alleluia at the Vigil (a short one, since Vigil usually runs near to three hours!). =   They'll get the Sinfonia from Bach 33 (yes, I am not above playing a transcription when it comes to this piece--it's so wonderfully festive) or = the Mathias "Fanfare" on Easter Sunday, depending upon my mood. I'll decide on = Thursday, when my final submission of organ voluntaries for Sunday are due on the secretary's desk! I'm just so very tired of the Widor, the Final from = Vierne 1 and many of the other "usual suspects". I suspect the congregation might like something fresh, too.   Pax, Bill H.    
(back) Subject: Lanquetuit From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 16:59:06 -0500   Randy said: "I'd rather play the Lanquetuit but I can always postpone that until the Sunday"   And I keep wondering if Lanquetuit is related to Round Tuit. ;>)   Dennis Steckley   Every gun that is made and every warship that is launched, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed--Dwight Eisenhower        
(back) Subject: Re: Lanquetuit From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 18:08:56 -0400   on 4/6/04 5:59 PM, First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois at kzrev@rr1.net wrote:   > Randy said: "I'd rather play the Lanquetuit but I can always postpone > that until the Sunday" > > And I keep wondering if Lanquetuit is related to Round Tuit. ;>) > > Dennis Steckley   Oh yes. That thing that when you get one then you'll have done what = you're supposed to have done.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Schlicker at Grace Church at 10th street and Broadway in NYC From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 15:39:02 -0700   Re: Schlicker at Grace Church at 10th street and Broadway in NYC >A low Episcopal church with a high Lutheran organ? I've wondered if = it was accidentally delivered by the UPS man to >the wrong building. = There are several Lutheran churches within a mile or two that could make = better use of that >instrument, even in shaky condition. I've heard = organists who knew the instrument get adequate sound from it, but it was = >more a credit to the organist than to the instrument. (How they = happened to select it, or even when, I have no idea.)   >Alan=20   As it happens, I was living in NYC and went to the inaugural recital = by Marilyn Mason on November 28, 1965, and still have the program. (I = kept it because of my packrat tendencies, not because of any affection = or respect for the organ.) The program includes a history of the organs = in Grace Church, which reads in part: "In 1902 during the long tenure of = James Morris Helfenstein as organist and choir master, the young and = almost unknown Ernest M. Skinner was selected to replace the gallery = [Erben] organ...It was the second organ the SKinner factory, then in New = York City, had produced. In 1914 he completed a new chancel organ [which = replaced an 1878 Roosevelt]...Toward the close of 1928, in consultation = with Ernest Mitchell who became organist and choirmaster in 1922, the = Skinner firm rebuilt and enlarged the 1902 gallery organ, making both = organs playable from one console in the chancel. In 1961 it was decided = to replace the Skinner instrument with an entirely new organ built along = classical lines. Herman L. Schlicker, president of the Schlicker Organ = Company of Buffalo, New York, was selected to design and build the = present organ. The total cost of the organ in its two divisions, with = cabinet work and preparation of the organ spaces, will be approximately = $135,000...The organ has 74 voices, 101 ranks, and includes duplcate = three-manual consoles for gallery and chancel, to afford complete = control over the total resources of the instrument from either location. = Unnicked pipe-work is featured throughout, and slider chests are = utilized in the gallery organ." It acknowledges that the Principal, a = thirty-two foot long wooden stop, was retained from the old organ.   In spite of all that, I wonder if anyone actually convinced members of = the congregation that they should enjoy what they heard from the new = Schlicker.   MAF     It seems to have been 30 ranks in the chancel, 62 in the gallery, = played from =    
(back) Subject: Reminder-Ron Reseigh Plays Rochester Wurlitzer Saturday (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 19:13:30 -0400   Just a reminder that Ron Reseigh will present his encore performance on = our 4/23 Wurlitzer this Saturday, April 10 at 8 PM. The event will take place = in the refurbished NEW Auditorium Theatre, 875 East Main Street, Rochester, = NY 14605. Tickets are only $15 each. The box office opens at 7 PM on the evening of the concert.   Driving directions, Ron's biography, lots of photographs and organ data = and more are available at http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ . Anyone familiar with the artistry of Ron Reseigh and the outstanding quality of the RTOS Wurlitzer and its acoustic environment will want to attend this evening of pure theater pipe organ enjoyment! The rest of you should discover it for yourselves.   Submitted by Ken Evans, RTOS Director (past-president)    
(back) Subject: Hal Pritchard From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 18:28:42 -0500   It is my sad duty to report the passing of long time theatre organ supporter, Hal Pritchard. Hal passed away at 3:45 this afternoon during a heart procedure. In his own quiet way, Hal was instrumental in keeping the =   theatre organ spirit alive in the Chicago area for many years. He has been =   a member of the CATOE chapter of ATOS and through his participation on the =   CATOE Board of Directors been instrumental in helping the successful implementation of theatre organ programs in the Chicago area. Hal's eloquent prose has often appeared in the TO magazine through his reporting =   of chapter activities. He has been a good friend and mentor to us all, and =   will be sorely missed by his many friends in the theatre organ world.   Jon C. Habermaas    
(back) Subject: RE: Flags -- Cadet Chapel & altar From: "Wm. G. Chapman" <wchapmn@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 19:55:26 -0400   Colin and F. Richard and others:   I do not know if there is a West Point, MA. I do know that there is a = West Point, NY--which is home to The United States Military Academy.   At the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY there are the following Chapels: (1) Cadet Chapel (Seats 1500 with world's largest all-pipe organ in a religious structure--over 340 ranks.) http://www.usma.edu/Chaplain/cadetchapel.htm=20 (2) Old Cadet Chapel (Pipe organ is a nice 2m and low 20 ranks.) http://www.usma.edu/Chaplain/oldcadetchapel.htm=20 (3) Post Chapel (Pipe organ is about 57 ranks.) http://www.usma.edu/Chaplain/postchapel.htm=20 (4) Most Holy Trinity Chapel (Pipe organ is about 12 ranks.) http://www.usma.edu/Chaplain/catholicchapel.htm (5) St. Martin's Chapel [Orthodox] (Pipe organ is about 5 ranks.) (6) Jewish Chapel (Pipe organ--well there is not one.) http://www.usma.edu/Chaplain/jewishchapel.htm   A photo of the current Director of Music and Organist for the Cadet = Chapel may be seen at: http://community.webshots.com/photo/22662617/14677772pwPpZuxXMq The = Cadet Chapel organ is played for services, concerts, heads-of-state and other visiting dignitaries, weddings, funerals, memorial services and a = multitude of other special occasions. The Cadet Chapel does indeed have = reproductions of the original battle flags hanging down the length of the Nave. There = are no flags at the altar.   The Office of the Chaplain provides weekly services for better than 20 different religious groups, if memory serves correctly. There are over = 4000 cadets at the Academy. The Academy hosts some 3,000,000 visitors each = year. If you would like a tour of the Chapel and organ then come make = arrangements to attend this fall with the AIO. http://pipeorgan.org   Wm. G. Chapman       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = F. Richard Burt Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 12:10 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Flag near alter     Hello, Collin: =20 > Now my guess is that they have flags at the Cadet > Chapel, West Point MA. >=20 > Would I be wrong? =20 Perhaps, more than that. The West Point Post Chapel=20 (protestant) is at the United States Military Academy=20 (the Military view all religions as Catholic, Protestant,=20 or Jewish, ...until recently).   One of the West Point Post Chapel websites shows a=20 picture of the full length of the nave and I lifted this=20 quotation from the supporting text.. . .=20 =20 "A Gothic-style Cadet Chapel houses original regimental=20 battle flags going back to the Civil War; and the largest=20 working church organ in the world is there."=20 =20 Give the author some editorial license <smiles>, but they=20 are rather appreciative of that enormous organ that is in=20 continuous use (and probably maintenance and repair). =20 And, . . .yes, the Military folk have a very strong tradition=20 of flags of many kinds. Let's don't go there, for it will get=20 us into another two weeks of talking about ancillary subjects=20 to organ building. <smiles> =20 I am surprised that no one has bothered to correct the=20 mis-spelling in the subject line. Just what flags are there=20 near whatever we are altering, anyway?   F. Richard Burt =20 =20 ..   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: RE: Easter postludes From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 18:45:47 -0500   I hope that's not what I'm playing!   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Randolph Runyon     I think a lot of those visitors who show up for Easter as their only Sunday of the year probably expect the Widor.          
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 20:24:28 -0400   on 4/6/04 7:45 PM, Glenda at gksjd85@direcway.com wrote:   > I hope that's not what I'm playing! > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com     Glenda dear, are you playing somewhere, then?     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 19:57:15 -0500   I was planning on playing Albert Renaud's Toccata in d for postlude, but today I brought a couple of other things to church and have decided on Vierne:   Carillon de Westminster for prelude; Finale from Symphony No. 1 for postlude   I hope never to play "the Widor" again, but one should never say never, I guess. Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu>     > Time for a new topic, I think. What are youse playing for Easter postlude?      
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 21:17:17 EDT   In a message dated 4/6/2004 8:58:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, = lindr@core.com writes:   > I hope never to play "the Widor" again   i should qualify this and say that i have not played this at a church = service in 20 years and that is why it is a big deal to do it this year. <G>   last year i did some Guilmant thing based i think on Thine is the Glory. for Palm Sunday i played his P&F on the Handel Lift up your heads.....   old news--- sorry   Widor wins this year....next year may i be in a new Jerusalem where all is =   perfect and everything i know is new again.   dale hiding in southwest Florida    
(back) Subject: Guilmant's real theme From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 21:47:25 -0400   on 4/6/04 9:17 PM, Keys4bach@aol.com at Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   In a message dated 4/6/2004 8:58:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, lindr@core.co= m writes:   I hope never to play "the Widor" again     i should qualify this and say that i have not played this at a church service in 20 years and that is why it is a big deal to do it this year. <G= >   last year i did some Guilmant thing based i think on Thine is the Glory. for Palm Sunday i played his P&F on the Handel Lift up your heads.....   old news--- sorry   Widor wins this year....next year may i be in a new Jerusalem where all is perfect and everything i know is new again.   dale hiding in southwest Florida   You know, Guilmant was either playing a joke on us or was misinformed. His so-called "Lift Up Your Heads" theme is actually based on "Caro mio ben," a love song by Giuseppe Giordano (1743-1798). Text is: "Caro mio ben, credim= i almen senza di te languisce il cor. Il tuo fedel sospira ognor. Cessa, crudel, tanto rigor!" (My dear beloved, believe me at least, without you my heart languishes. Your faithful one always sighs; cease, cruel one, so muc= h punishment.) The melody is familiar to me because I used to sing it when I took voice lessons many moons ago.   It's rather like the case of Handel's "famous Largo," which as you probably know is taken from a song Xerxes (in the opera of that name, I think--I've never seen it) sings to a tree he was in love with: "Ombra mai fu / di vegetabile / cara ed amabile / soave piu." (Never was shade / Of dear and amiable / Vegetable / More Sweet."). I found this on the web: Handel's Xerxes begins with a famous largo, 'Shade as it never was' (Ombra mai fu), sung by the self-same King of Kings to his beloved: a plane tree. Aelian, a collector of amazing historical facts, provides the fullest account of this bizarre episode: "That Xerxes fellow was a clown .=A0.=A0. he was slavishly devoted to a plane tree, as if the tree was something to be wondered at. At any rate, they say that in the middle of western Turkey [Lydia] he saw a specimen of magnificent proportions and stayed there all day long, for no particular reason, even pitching camp in the deserted region where the tree stood. What's more, he put expensive jewellery on her, honouring her twigs and branches with necklaces and bracelets, and he left her in charge of a caretaker, like a guard protecting a sweetheart from unwanted attentions." Strange love indeed.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu          
(back) Subject: Re: Easter postludes From: "Nicholas Good" <nickgood@ix.netcom.com> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 21:06:06 -0500   I'm playing Fletcher Percy's Festival Toccata this year. I have two services a year where the minister asks the congregation to remain seated for the postlude (Easter and Christmas Eve). This will be the first = time I've played the Festival Toccata in a non-wedding setting. (Often use it as post-recessional music). Its lots of fun to play, and sounds harder =   than it actually is which in my case is a good thing! I only play Widor every 2nd or 3rd year-- it is so hard on my wrists for some reason.   Nicholas Good, Organist, CAGO Lowman United Methodist Topeka, Kansas   31 rank 2 manual Reuter, 1991.   At 12:45 PM 04/06/2004, Randolph Runyon wrote: >Time for a new topic, I think. What are youse playing for Easter = postlude? >My guess is that at least 50% will be playing the Widor Toccata in F. > >Randy Runyon      
(back) Subject: Re: Guilmant's real theme From: "cnash cnash" <cnash@mail.fbcaiken.org> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 22:08:02 -0400     AHH!! You are talking about the Guilmant paraphrase on Judas Maccabaeus...= ....one of my FAVORITEs....I usually do a dialogue between the two fanfare t= rumpets at the beginning....it is so EASY...yet so dramatic and nice...that= is one of my preludes for this Sunday.   Christopher Nash             ---------- Original Message ---------------------------------- From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 21:47:25 -0400   >on 4/6/04 9:17 PM, Keys4bach@aol.com at Keys4bach@aol.com wrote: > >In a message dated 4/6/2004 8:58:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, lindr@core.c= om >writes: > >I hope never to play "the Widor" again > > >i should qualify this and say that i have not played this at a church >service in 20 years and that is why it is a big deal to do it this year. <= G> > >last year i did some Guilmant thing based i think on Thine is the Glory. >for Palm Sunday i played his P&F on the Handel Lift up your heads..... > >old news--- sorry > >Widor wins this year....next year may i be in a new Jerusalem where all is=   >perfect and everything i know is new again. > >dale hiding in southwest Florida > >You know, Guilmant was either playing a joke on us or was misinformed. Hi= s >so-called "Lift Up Your Heads" theme is actually based on "Caro mio ben," = a >love song by Giuseppe Giordano (1743-1798). Text is: "Caro mio ben, credi= mi >almen senza di te languisce il cor. Il tuo fedel sospira ognor. Cessa, >crudel, tanto rigor!" (My dear beloved, believe me at least, without you m= y >heart languishes. Your faithful one always sighs; cease, cruel one, so mu= ch >punishment.) The melody is familiar to me because I used to sing it when = I >took voice lessons many moons ago. > >It's rather like the case of Handel's "famous Largo," which as you probabl= y >know is taken from a song Xerxes (in the opera of that name, I think--I've=   >never seen it) sings to a tree he was in love with: "Ombra mai fu / di >vegetabile / cara ed amabile / soave piu." (Never was shade / Of dear and=   >amiable / Vegetable / More Sweet."). I found this on the web: Handel's >Xerxes begins with a famous largo, 'Shade as it never was' (Ombra mai fu),=   >sung by the self-same King of Kings to his beloved: a plane tree. Aelian, = a >collector of amazing historical facts, provides the fullest account of thi= s >bizarre episode: "That Xerxes fellow was a clown .=A0.=A0. he was slavishl= y >devoted to a plane tree, as if the tree was something to be wondered at. A= t >any rate, they say that in the middle of western Turkey [Lydia] he saw a >specimen of magnificent proportions and stayed there all day long, for no >particular reason, even pitching camp in the deserted region where the tre= e >stood. What's more, he put expensive jewellery on her, honouring her twigs=   >and branches with necklaces and bracelets, and he left her in charge of a >caretaker, like a guard protecting a sweetheart from unwanted attentions."=   >Strange love indeed. > > >Randy Runyon >Music Director >Zion Lutheran Church >Hamilton, Ohio >runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > >